1,449 episodes

A mostly-every-night earful of the genius that was actor, writer, satirist, and humorist Jean Shepherd. Shep (as both he and his fans called him) is very hard to tie down to one or two labels. He was one of the great media talents from the 50s to the 80s, very much like the Mark Twain of his time, and most nights he could be heard on the radio waxing eloquent, his gift for insight and articulation wrapped up in what seemed like comedic nostalgia, fascinating and inspiring generations. His stories work on so many levels. His characters are vivid, unforgettable, and oddly likable. Shep had an uncanny mastery of the narrative form: enticing the listener with his nightly premise, careening down one tangent to the next, eliciting knowing laughs along the way, and often leaving one with a warm sense of the fondness the artist felt for his past. And somehow, more often than not, one might sense a deeper meaning, a hidden message in all the lighthearted romps. This podcast is an attempt to maintain, and hopefully spread, awareness of Jean Shepherd, his wonderful mind, and his amazing body of work. (photograph (c) Copyright Fred W. McDarrah, Used With Permission)

The Brass Figlagee Jean Shepherd

    • Comedy
    • 4.7 • 94 Ratings

A mostly-every-night earful of the genius that was actor, writer, satirist, and humorist Jean Shepherd. Shep (as both he and his fans called him) is very hard to tie down to one or two labels. He was one of the great media talents from the 50s to the 80s, very much like the Mark Twain of his time, and most nights he could be heard on the radio waxing eloquent, his gift for insight and articulation wrapped up in what seemed like comedic nostalgia, fascinating and inspiring generations. His stories work on so many levels. His characters are vivid, unforgettable, and oddly likable. Shep had an uncanny mastery of the narrative form: enticing the listener with his nightly premise, careening down one tangent to the next, eliciting knowing laughs along the way, and often leaving one with a warm sense of the fondness the artist felt for his past. And somehow, more often than not, one might sense a deeper meaning, a hidden message in all the lighthearted romps. This podcast is an attempt to maintain, and hopefully spread, awareness of Jean Shepherd, his wonderful mind, and his amazing body of work. (photograph (c) Copyright Fred W. McDarrah, Used With Permission)

    Save Gas Commercial

    Save Gas Commercial

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 1 min
    Rapid Shave

    Rapid Shave

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 37 sec
    In Hoc fragment

    In Hoc fragment

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 39 sec
    Illinois Tool Works 3

    Illinois Tool Works 3

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 53 sec
    Illinois Tool Works 2

    Illinois Tool Works 2

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 52 sec
    Illinois Tool Works 1

    Illinois Tool Works 1

    Jean Shepherd's Radio Show - 1977

    • 59 sec

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
94 Ratings

94 Ratings

Next Action Hero ,

Pleased to discover Jean Shepherd again

I have been a talk radio listener for decades, and I always regretted not having listened to Jean Shepherd when I could have as a kid. I remember getting little radios as gifts and never having anything that I wanted to listen to. Being able to fill the time with honest, fun stories that are in some ways still relevant is almost therapeutic. Great podcast.

taxgirljudy ,

Irrelevant and still a socially pertinent commentary.

I’m exceedingly happy that so many of my radio listing cohorts have rediscovered Jean Shepherd as adults. Although, I think he would have been a little disappointed that so many would relish the program out of nostalgia.

I’ve seen a number of his social predictions come to pass and most of Shepherd’s commentary remains pertinent today. Almost all of his thumbnail plot sketches have become movie plots, ie “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”. In short his is a multi-talented voice that speaks to us out of the night still.

TurdEator ,

A regularly unacknowledged genius...

Growing up in the 90’s I started watching reruns of “The Wonder Years,” and I was drawn to the vivid narration that Kevin (the main character) gave during each episode. Little did I know that Christmas Eve ‘98 I would again find that style of narration in a feature film called “A Christmas Story.” It turns out that the creator of the feature film inspired the style of narration I fell in love with. Good ole Jean Shepherd! Over the last two decades I’ve poured over articles, listened to radio shows, and watched tv shows with the content or commentary that Shep creates. I feel a connection to this man and his work unlike anything I’ve ever felt before. Thank you for creating this podcast. Shep doesn’t get the recognition he deserves in popular culture today. He is more than the segment of a book that has gained America’s love and adoration. I’m glad you’ve helped chronicle his contributions during his life. He deserves to be well known.

Excelsior!

Top Podcasts In Comedy

You Might Also Like