41 episodes

The Complete is dedicated to taking chronological journeys through the most rewarding filmographies in cinema. Each season covers one director, with each episode focusing on one feature film from their catalog. The first season was dedicated to Stanley Kubrick, while the second season covered Elaine May and the third focused on Krzysztof Kieślowski. Our current season explores the films of Satoshi Kon.

The Complete Podcast Matthew Gasteier

    • Film History
    • 4.7 • 21 Ratings

The Complete is dedicated to taking chronological journeys through the most rewarding filmographies in cinema. Each season covers one director, with each episode focusing on one feature film from their catalog. The first season was dedicated to Stanley Kubrick, while the second season covered Elaine May and the third focused on Krzysztof Kieślowski. Our current season explores the films of Satoshi Kon.

    The Complete Kon 2 – Millennium Actress

    The Complete Kon 2 – Millennium Actress

    In this episode, Matt and Travis cover Satoshi Kon’s second feature, Millennium Actress. In many ways a reworking of the themes and techniques Kon explored in his debut, the film is nevertheless an entirely different viewing experience: an uplifting and deeply moving exploration of a woman’s life in movies and her quest to find the … Continue reading The Complete Kon 2 – Millennium Actress →

    • 1 hr 50 min
    The Complete Kon 1 – Perfect Blue

    The Complete Kon 1 – Perfect Blue

    On the first episode of our fourth season, Matt and Travis begin to work through the catalog of Satoshi Kon, our first Japanese filmmaker and the first to work in the medium of animation. We talk about Kon’s life and anime before diving into his debut feature, Perfect Blue. One of the great animated thrillers, … Continue reading The Complete Kon 1 – Perfect Blue →

    • 2 hr
    The Complete Kieślowski 19 – Wrap Up

    The Complete Kieślowski 19 – Wrap Up

    On the final episode of the season, we reflect on the films we’ve watched over the past two years and the legacy of Kieślowski. We also cover films produced after his death that were associated with him through scripts and other connections, plus the books we’ve enjoyed along the way. We end with our final … Continue reading The Complete Kieślowski 19 – Wrap Up →

    • 1 hr 27 min
    The Complete Kieślowski 18 – Three Colors: Red

    The Complete Kieślowski 18 – Three Colors: Red

    For the last of our episodes on Kieślowski’s final work, the Three Colors trilogy, we are joined again by Ericca Long, co-host of The Magic Lantern Podcast to discuss Red, the director’s final work before retiring and soon after passing away from complications during heart surgery. We discuss the film’s depiction of its female protagonist … Continue reading The Complete Kieślowski 18 – Three Colors: Red →

    • 1 hr 35 min
    The Complete Kieślowski 17 – Three Colors: White

    The Complete Kieślowski 17 – Three Colors: White

    For the second of our episodes on Kieślowski’s final work, the Three Colors trilogy, we are joined again by Ericca Long, co-host of The Magic Lantern Podcast to discuss White, the second film in the series. A surprising departure in a number of ways from the director’s previous two films, White represents a return to … Continue reading The Complete Kieślowski 17 – Three Colors: White →

    • 1 hr 36 min
    The Complete Kieślowski 16 – Three Colors: Blue

    The Complete Kieślowski 16 – Three Colors: Blue

    For the first of our episodes on Kieślowski’s final work, the Three Colors trilogy, we are joined by Ericca Long, co-host of The Magic Lantern Podcast to discuss Blue, the first film in the series. The second film Kieślowski made with international financing, Blue is another towering work of European arthouse cinema, yet remains surprisingly … Continue reading The Complete Kieślowski 16 – Three Colors: Blue →

    • 2 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

Christian Vogan ,

Top-Notch Analysis!!

A huge leap ahead of other movie podcasts, not just deciding whether the movie was good and whether they liked it, actual exploration of themes!!!

Nickzol ,

Perfect

This podcast is exactly what I’m looking for. Knowledgeable and engaging hosts who thoroughly research the films they discuss. There are plenty of podcasts out there that are similarly well done, but this is the one for this particular genre.

khrissbliss ,

Never lame! Always Insightful

These guys def share my tastes in movies so for me personally this is a rare gem, especially as the probe similar questions & concerns as I do-
- thus i recommend this podcast only to the right people
(Or the best people, as Kubrick’s characters would say.)

Very much enjoyed the Full Metal Jacket review.
I’m very simpatico with your take on its flaws:
-the 3 staged scenes where one by one each character gets a line: NIX

-The racism-homophobia- sexism is still cringe inducing.

-I also thought WoolyBully, Surfing Bird, & These Boots, even in 1987, were hits too ubiquitous & huge to put in the film. (But Vivian Kubrick’s soundtrack holds up well, oddly enough.)
I also rank this film way below Barry Lyndon & Eyes Wide Shut.

I do diverge though, wherein I don’t love the first third as much as the last two thirds.
****What has always grabbed me about this film is the awkward chaos of having the chain of command ...um
...killed.*****
Pyle is the innocent hero in a way, because instead of enduring to go kill 13 year girls in braids protecting their homeland, he kills the real enemy; the sadistic drill sergeant who’s never seen battle- (in his boxers no less- SO satisfying.) All the sexist, homophobic humiliation & dehumanization doesn’t prepare the grunts for guerilla warfare as much as-
Learning to Read Maps 101, &
Don’t Touch TeddyBears 101.
For all the emasculation & thumbsucking that goes on in boot camp, these grunts can’t cohere under leadership after being debased together, so understandably many of them get taken out by a 13 year old girl (NO BOOT CAMP) while they’re struggling to call in tanks & helicopters. Fat lot of good all the macho posturing & degrading march chants gets ya, “ladies”.
(Spoiler: the U.S. loses the war.)

Say what you will about the dumb jock sociopath Animal Mother, at least his brute disobedience leads to overcoming the obstacle: I doubt he’s too concerned about how to make beds, shine boots, or stealing donuts.

I also think that there’s tension in Jokerman being the not funny guy who’s sense of humor struggles to evolve or extinguish in the face of his situation.
Maybe he started the Mickey Mouse sing-a-long?

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