100 episodes

The Disruptive Voice explores the theories of Disruptive Innovation across a broad set of industries and circumstances with academics, researchers, and practitioners who have been inspired and taught by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton M. Christensen, who was one of the world’s top experts on growth and innovation.

For more information, email fgi@hbs.edu.

BSSE = Building and Sustaining a Successful Enterprise, Professor Clayton M. Christensen's signature course at the Harvard Business School and a breeding ground for many of the ideas shared in this podcast.

The Disruptive Voice Clay Christensen's Forum for Growth and Innovation at the Harvard Business

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 41 Ratings

The Disruptive Voice explores the theories of Disruptive Innovation across a broad set of industries and circumstances with academics, researchers, and practitioners who have been inspired and taught by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton M. Christensen, who was one of the world’s top experts on growth and innovation.

For more information, email fgi@hbs.edu.

BSSE = Building and Sustaining a Successful Enterprise, Professor Clayton M. Christensen's signature course at the Harvard Business School and a breeding ground for many of the ideas shared in this podcast.

    101. Learning To Build: A Conversation with Bob Moesta

    101. Learning To Build: A Conversation with Bob Moesta

    This is a true story of one man, his four children, four mentors, and five skills. It began when Bob Moesta’s now-grown children moved out of the family home. Bob and his wife decided to clean things out a bit and during that process, in their attic, Bob came across eight hundred and forty-seven notebooks containing information on everything that he had worked on throughout his career! As he started to read through the notebooks it became clear that he had a great deal of information to share, wisdom gained over the years from his experiences working alongside his four mentors. Out of that attic discovery was born Bob's new book, "Learning To Build: The Five Bedrock Skills of Innovators and Entrepreneurs". The book is dedicated to his mentors as follows: "To my mentors: Drs. Clayton Christensen, Genichi Taguchi, W. Edwards Deming, and Willie Hobbs Moore, who shared their knowledge with me so that I could pay it forward." In this episode, Bob joins host Katie Zandbergen to discuss the five fundamental skills of innovators and entrepreneurs, gleaned from his decades working as an innovative builder, teacher, and entrepreneur. He also reflects on his friendship with Clay and the importance of mentors; the power of mindset change; projects that he's currently working on; and why people should "hire" his new book. Above all, Bob is focused on paying it forward and helping others to make progress in their lives. Listen to learn more!

    • 37 min
    The Disruptive Voice's 100th Episode - Anomalies Wanted

    The Disruptive Voice's 100th Episode - Anomalies Wanted

    Many listeners will know that Clay had a homemade “Anomalies Wanted” sign in his office at Harvard Business School – it was the backbone of his approach to research and theory building, as he worked to strengthen and refine his frameworks over the years. Many past guests on this podcast, when asked about what made Clay such a powerful thinker and teacher, responded saying that he was humble, that he was open to learning from everyone, and that he was always on the lookout for anomalies. Specifically, Clay viewed anomalies not as threats to the viability or applicability of his work but – quite the opposite – as presenting opportunities to learn and to improve the frameworks. In this episode, you'll hear from a number of people who were near and dear to Clay, all of whom share their reflections and insights on the theme of "Anomalies Wanted."
    Thank you to the following individuals for their participation in this 100th episode project: Derek van Bever, Tom Bartman, Cliff Maxwell, Jon Palmer, Karen Dillon, Bob Moesta, Michael Horn, Max Wessel, Scott Anthony, and Ann Christensen. Thank you also to Tracy Kim Horn for getting this podcast off the ground back in 2016; to Craig McDonald for his work behind the scenes, overseeing the recording sessions; to our many wonderful guests and hosts; to our listeners, for tuning in and for sharing The Disruptive Voice with others; and, of course, to Clay, who continues to inspire us. We look forward to the next 100 episodes and to the discovery of those anomalies that we'll undoubtedly uncover along the way. If you have anomalies to share with us, please do reach out! Anomalies Wanted.  

    • 58 min
    99. Rebuilding Arts Audiences Through Customer-Centric Engagement: A Conversation with Ruth Hartt

    99. Rebuilding Arts Audiences Through Customer-Centric Engagement: A Conversation with Ruth Hartt

    When you receive a brochure in the mail from your local symphony or visit a website for your regional orchestra, what do you typically see? You’re very likely going to read flowery language about the beauty of the art and the skill of the artists, accompanied by photos of the conductor and the musicians on the stage. You probably won’t see the audience or how the experience might impact them. The arts sector, however, is in the midst of an audience crisis – and the time has come for arts organizations to stop ignoring their customers. In this episode, The Christensen Institute’s Ruth Hartt, who spent 17 years as an opera singer, joins host Katie Zandbergen to discuss how the Jobs To Be Done framework can be used as an effective tool by arts organizations, helping them to better engage with and grow their audiences. While many in the arts world have been operating under the comfortable assumption that they’ve nailed customer motivation, believing that “Help me to experience art performed at its highest level” is the primary motivator for ticket purchases, this approach fails to truly understand customers’ struggling moments and the reasons why they may hire an orchestral performance or an evening out at the opera. Armed with techniques and insights drawn from Jobs Theory, arts organizations can successfully shift from simply trying to push tickets to actually helping their customers and their communities through the arts-focused experiences that they provide. Listen to learn more about the opportunities for audience engagement and growth that await those arts administrators and marketers who recognize that the world revolves not around the performances they stage but rather around their customers and the progress they’re seeking to make in their lives.

    • 32 min
    98. How Covid Crashed The System – And Where To Go From Here: A Conversation with Dr. David Nash

    98. How Covid Crashed The System – And Where To Go From Here: A Conversation with Dr. David Nash

    Founding Dean at Jefferson College of Population Health, Dr. David Nash, recently co-authored a book entitled "How Covid Crashed The System: A Guide To Fixing American Health Care", in which he and Charles Wohlforth draw parallels between flying a plane and delivering healthcare services. Leaning into the analogy, they liken the American healthcare system to an airplane crash – and they’re the post-crash investigators searching for the black box. The first half of the book describes to readers what was found in the black box of our healthcare system, while the second half presents the authors’ report about how we might fix this mess and get the plane back in the air. In this episode, David joins The Christensen Institute’s Ann Somers Hogg to discuss insights about the fault lines in American healthcare; how the pandemic shone a spotlight on the challenges that were already present long before March of 2020; and steps that we can take – including a more aggressive approach to tackling drivers of health, realigning incentives, and rethinking medical education – to address the multiple system failures in our current healthcare system. Listen to hear more about this opportunity to build a better, safer, and more equitable healthcare system in the United States.

    • 31 min
    97. Fueling The Energy Transition: A Conversation With Frank Mycroft

    97. Fueling The Energy Transition: A Conversation With Frank Mycroft

    One of the items you’ll find on Booster Co-Founder & CEO Frank Mycroft’s desk is a BSSE placemat, highlighting the frameworks that are covered in the course, which Frank took at Harvard Business School in 2012. Since its founding in 2015, Booster has built an energy-agnostic, modular, mobile network in which the company knows the energy demands of its customers, has the ability to procure the right energy products at the right time, and can leverage technology to ascertain the sustainability scores of these energy products – and all without needing to build complicated brick-and-mortar infrastructure that can make it impossible to get to the scale that alternative energy types and fuels need to be successful. In this episode, Frank joins Rose Park Advisors' Steve Geskos to discuss the story of Booster, from the struggling moments that were the seeds of its founding and innovative approach to energy delivery; to the transition to fleets; to today’s smart energy and data management initiatives; to Frank’s thoughts on Booster’s future upmarket moves and growth. Given that Frank has drawn on insights gleaned from the BSSE frameworks throughout his time building and scaling the business, Booster represents a great example of theory in action, in this case, as applied to the acceleration of adoption of greenhouse emissions-reducing products, such as renewable diesels, biofuels, electricity for EVs, and hydrogen. Listen to learn more about how Booster is helping its customers to navigate the mixed energy future!

    • 38 min
    96. Seeing Around Corners: A Conversation with Rita McGrath

    96. Seeing Around Corners: A Conversation with Rita McGrath

    Clayton Christensen and Rita McGrath, one of the top management thinkers in the world, spent over two decades as both colleagues and friends. To this day, the concept of Discovery-Driven Planning, first widely introduced in a 1995 HBR article by Rita and Ian MacMillan, is taught in the Building and Sustaining a Successful Enterprise course at Harvard Business School. In this insightful conversation, Rita joins host Derek van Bever to discuss a number of topics highly relevant to management and strategy, including her work on inflection points and spotting the future before it arrives; the importance of testing fundamental assumptions (and why we so often fail to do so); barriers to innovation and growth; and Valize, the company that Rita founded to help organizations build lasting innovation capability as the basis for long-term shared prosperity. Listen to learn more!

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
41 Ratings

41 Ratings

Pandamantic ,

Disruption Fan

This podcast is a little gem. If you are a fan of Christensens' theories, there is lots to like, and if you are new to the ideas you can see them in action with real business operators. Demystifies Jobs To Be Done and Modularity with real world examples. Really well done and thoughtful.

AlexOlsen ,

Powerful theories and lessons for life!

Can’t recommend this podcast and these theories enough! They have been foundational to my personal and professional life. I was extremely fortunate to take BSSE with Professor Rory McDonald. The lessons he taught, that are shared in this podcast, continue to guide my career and relationships.

ccampbellhale ,

Every day...

almost 19 years after having clay as a professor and I still use his frameworks every single day. Thank you, Prof Christensen and the BSSE team!

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