8 episodes

We're buzzed about movies. We feature interviews with directors, actors and cinematographers to reveal what makes brilliant movies timeless.

The Drunk Projectionist Todd Melby

    • TV & Film
    • 4.8 • 11 Ratings

We're buzzed about movies. We feature interviews with directors, actors and cinematographers to reveal what makes brilliant movies timeless.

    Ep. 8: Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo

    Ep. 8: Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo

    An interview with Brett Harvey, director of "Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo." After struggling with heroin and robbing stores as a teenager, Trejo spent years incarcerated in California prisons. After his release, he worked as a drug counselor. A fluke visit to a movie set resulted in Trejo landing a tiny role in "Runaway Train." More small roles followed, mostly as a badasses. The Los Angeles actor is best known for his roles in "Machete," "Con Air," "Dusk Till Dawn," and "Heat."

    • 31 min
    Ep. 7: Napoléon

    Ep. 7: Napoléon

    Georges Mourier describes Napoléon as “not just a masterpiece." The Cinémathèque Française restoration expert says the 1927 silent film "is also a monster piece.” Which is why, while working on a new restoration of the Abel Gance classic, Mourier never be alone with Napoléon. Instead, a collaborator will always be with him in the screening room as he grapples with the genius of Gance. In this episode of The Drunk Projectionist podcast, host Todd Melby and Mourier discuss the many versions of the movie, discuss the snowball fight scene, analyze the singing of the Marseillaise at the Club Des Cordeliers, and much more. Also here: https://bit.ly/2jQB3aw

    Ep. 6: Albert Serra

    Ep. 6: Albert Serra

    The Drunk Projectionist's Todd Melby interviews Albert Serra, the director of "The Death of Louis XIV." The opinionated and entertaining Serra discusses the film's origin as an art installation at the Centre Pompidou in Paris (1:58), Louis XIV's agony (2:58), pre-filmmaking discussions with collaborators (4:00), how he gets five "magical" minutes every day when shooting (12:12), oworking with Jean-Pierre Leaud (13:10), the intelligence of actors (17:15), silent film star Harry Langdon (19:25), Andy Warhol's films (22:30), why he doesn't look at shots from inside the camera (26:00), the film's most important scene (33:33), the relationship between truth and beauty (42:50).

    Ep. 5: Charles Burnett

    Ep. 5: Charles Burnett

    The Drunk Projectionist's Todd Melby interviews Charles Burnett, director of "Killer of Sheep." Critic Terrence Rafferty of GQ called the film "one of the most striking debuts in movie history." The movie examines the black Los Angeles ghetto of Watts in the mid-1970s through the eyes of Stan, a sensitive dreamer who is growing detached and numb from the psychic toll of working at a slaughterhouse. Frustrated by money problems, he finds respite in moments of simple beauty: the warmth of a teacup against his cheek, slow dancing with his wife, holding his daughter.

    • 26 min
    Ep: 4 Frederick Wiseman

    Ep: 4 Frederick Wiseman

    The Drunk Projectionist's Todd Melby interviews Frederick Wiseman director of "Titicut Follies," a 1967 documentary about a hospital for the criminally insane. In this interview with Todd Melby, he also reveals why he shot most of his movies on 16mm, how his films are structurally similar to plays and why he hates the term "cinema verite." In the interview, Wiseman discusses Jim's victimization at the hands of prison guards (5:20), Vladmir's case review (9:07), the limitations of documentaries (13:54), the importances of long scenes (17:28), the length of his films (20:03), on directing a theatrical production of "Happy Days" (24:45), on the advantages of shooting on 16mm (26:29), on recording sound and working with cinematographers (28:51), on other documentary filmmakers (29:31), and on "cinema verite" (29:58).

    • 31 min
    Ep. 3: Fargo

    Ep. 3: Fargo

    When the Coen Brothers released "Fargo" in 1996, pretty much all of North Dakota and Minnesota got upset. "We don't talk like that," they said. Well, the Drunk Projectionist's Todd Melby is from North Dakota and he's here to tell you they do. In this episode, you'll hear an audio documentary he produced with Diane Richard. The doc features the film's dialect coach Elizabeth Himmelstein (7:00), actor William H. Macy (10:10) actor Stephen Park dissecting his Mike Yanagita role (15:30), marketing the city of Fargo to tourists (20:20), film professor Bob Cowgill (26:55), actor Bain Boehlke talks about his role as Mr. Mohra (30:50), female cops discuss Marge Gunderson (33:45), actor John Carroll Lynch on his role as Norm Gunderson (42:00), director Ethan Coen (44:45) and actor Tony Denman on his role as Scotty Lundegaard (46:15).

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

reservation for Jerry ,

A Great Listen

Definitely a must listen to hear a diffrent slnt on the film industry you don't always hear and a show that's worth tuning into on a regular basis.

WrightsWords ,

This movie podcast is worth listening to.

I have seen and listened to too few episodes to be able to critique The Drunken Projectionist well. Charles Burnett is an awkward interview subject. Todd's conversation with Barbara Kopple, and the rapport that they found made the segment fun and informative; My problem was that I wanted to listen to more. I dug the Fargo conversation but the show flowed in a different way from the other episodes.

When you want to listen to backstories about cinema that go beyond shallow stuff, listen to this drunk guy. (Hey. It's in the title!)

The Woodswoman ,

Quality

Both in audio and in content, Tom does a great job narrating the interview!

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