294 episodes

One question posed to a high-profile newsmaker, followed up with lively debate. Anne McElvoy hosts The Economist's chat show. Published every Friday on Economist Radio.

The Economist Asks The Economist

    • News
    • 4.4 • 254 Ratings

One question posed to a high-profile newsmaker, followed up with lively debate. Anne McElvoy hosts The Economist's chat show. Published every Friday on Economist Radio.

    The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain

    The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain

    Can President Biden revive bipartisanship in America? Anne McElvoy asks the widow of Republican Senator John McCain and member of the Biden-Harris transition advisory council if Joe Biden can achieve his hopes of ‘unity’ in a divided America. After the violence at the Senate on the 6th of January, does the GOP still represent Mrs. McCain’s values and is America constitutionally strong? And, is she the next US ambassador to London? 
     
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    • 28 min
    The Economist Asks: Jimmy Wales

    The Economist Asks: Jimmy Wales

    As Wikipedia turns 20, we ask its founder Jimmy Wales how “the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit” really works. Also, as creator of another tech giant, does he reckon social media is still a force for good? And were some major platforms right to ban President Trump from communicating on them? He also confides his homeschooling tips.  


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    • 27 min
    The Economist Asks: Margaret MacMillan

    The Economist Asks: Margaret MacMillan

    After the shocking scenes in Washington DC this week, we ask war historian Margaret MacMillan if violence is an inevitable part of civilisation. Professor MacMillan, author of 'War: How conflict shaped us', reflects on whether the invasion of the Capitol qualifies as a coup. And she unravels the mystery of why we fight, from ancient times to the 21st century. 


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    • 27 min
    The Economist Asks: Misty Copeland

    The Economist Asks: Misty Copeland

    Was the first black principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre earlier denied roles because of her skin colour? She tells host, Anne McElvoy, how dance saved her from a difficult childhood and about her first performance in a classic Christmas production. And, which ballets would she remove from the repertoire?


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    • 27 min
    The Economist Asks: What next for Germany after Merkel?

    The Economist Asks: What next for Germany after Merkel?

    Anne McElvoy asks the former German ambassador to the US, Wolfgang Ischinger, if America can still be relied upon as a “protective uncle” and how it should deal with China. And, who will succeed Chancellor Merkel in 2021? Anne talks to German cabinet minister Jens Spahn, one of a proposed 'dream team' of candidates in the upcoming party leadership contest. 


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    • 26 min
    The Economist Asks: Joseph Henrich

    The Economist Asks: Joseph Henrich

    How stable is the West? Professor Joseph Henrich, chair of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, says that even successful societies can implode. He tells Anne McElvoy that the economically dominant Western identity, evolving from the “psychologically peculiar” minds of the population, could look very different in the future. 


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    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
254 Ratings

254 Ratings

WaitsTooLongToReview ,

Offers some great interviews you can’t get anywhere else, but can be hit or miss

Guests are usually great. I much prefer the business/political guests (Gates/Hastings/Cameron/Hong Kong futures) that are active in the “real world” more than the arts/literature guests that report on what others are doing, but the different perspectives are nice I suppose.

I alternate between cheering Anne for asking great questions and rolling my eyes and shaking my head at her. Her bias shows through very often, which I can deal with, but when The Economist brings in guests that are really polarized it is frustrating to listen to (Reines). I wish it was overall more balanced to the center.

Alex from Boston ,

Anne McElvoy is great

Anne McElvoy is a fantastic interviewer. She doesn’t fall for niceties or American media taboos. She is a great debater and won’t give ANY interviewee a free pass

blossoms ,

Bill Gates and Xi

In retrospect, Bill Gates and Xi will likely be regarded as the two most important figures in the fight against COVID-19. Xi shut down Wuhan, demonstrating that similar measures, including scaled down versions adapted to what is acceptable in other social contexts, will be necessary. The episode has also hinted at the massive role played by BG’s foundation. Both deserve Nobel prizes.

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