94 episodes

The history class visits the chemistry lab to explore wild tales of scientific adventure that stretch back to the beginning of time itself.

The Episodic Table of Elements T. R. Appleton

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 183 Ratings

The history class visits the chemistry lab to explore wild tales of scientific adventure that stretch back to the beginning of time itself.

    Preview The Episodic Table of Elements

    Preview The Episodic Table of Elements

    Wondering what sorts of things you might here on The Episodic Table of Elements? I've produced this brief teaser so you can get an idea of what kinds of stories you'll hear.

    • 1 min
    Thorium: Bright Lights, Big City

    Thorium: Bright Lights, Big City

    Sure, thorium could provide practically limitless clean energy, but then we couldn't build weapons of mass destruction.

    • 18 min
    Actinium: The Windup... And The Pitchblende

    Actinium: The Windup... And The Pitchblende

    We all know that radioactive rocks glow in the dark, except they actually don't, except for when they actually do.

    • 15 min
    Radium: Several Sordid Affairs

    Radium: Several Sordid Affairs

    Out of all the characters who encounter radium in this episode, the only one to emerge unscathed is the guy who comes face-to-face with Satan.

    • 33 min
    Francium: Nothing To Do With Cats

    Francium: Nothing To Do With Cats

    You don't have to have a degree to do science, but it helps.

    • 15 min
    Radon: It's Coming From Inside The House

    Radon: It's Coming From Inside The House

    You know something's amiss when you set off the radiation alarms while walking in to the nuclear power plant.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
183 Ratings

183 Ratings

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neon,tetra ,

This is absolutely awesome

This show is amazing I’ve never know so much about this stuff. I can’t wait for more episodes

J D'Amore ,

Great for science nerds and beginners alike

My partner and I love this podcast. She has a chemistry degree, whereas I have always struggled understanding science, and we both get so much out of the podcast. For her, it is an opportunity to learn more about the history of what she understood on a technical level, and to refresh her memory about things she hasn’t studied in a while. For me, it inspires me to learn more and provides a great foundation to build on, whereas other introductory material tends to be less interesting and harder to absorb.

Many scientists, technicians, and engineers I know complain that STEM schools don’t care much about teaching the humanities, history, social consciousness, and critical thinking. Because of that, I particularly appreciated TR’s insistence on highlighting ethical and political concerns that come up in the history of chemistry. Many episodes explore the chemistry industry’s disturbing (and not just historical but ongoing) role in imperialism, capitalism, ecological destruction, and the military industrial complex. This critical approach, alongside TR’s infectious passion for the hard science itself, challenges the audience to consider how to use science for the good instead of for violence and profit, which is depressingly all too common. This is vital achievement in science communication.

TR finds stories about each element that can be fascinating, bizarre, informative, inspiring, and silly (bad puns abound!) The result is a fantastic balance of education and entertainment. I wish more podcasts were like this!

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