89 episodes

The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange.

Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Wong Dolan; produced by Deanna Catto and Matthew Phung, and with support from the Australian Anthropological Society, the Australian National University’s Schools of Culture, History and Language and Archeology and Anthropology, and the Australian Centre for Public Awareness of Science, and produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

We acknowledge and celebrate the first Australians on whose traditional lands we record this podcast, and pay our respects to the elders of the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples, past, present, and emerging.

The Familiar Strange Your Familiar Strangers

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.5 • 27 Ratings

The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange.

Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Wong Dolan; produced by Deanna Catto and Matthew Phung, and with support from the Australian Anthropological Society, the Australian National University’s Schools of Culture, History and Language and Archeology and Anthropology, and the Australian Centre for Public Awareness of Science, and produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

We acknowledge and celebrate the first Australians on whose traditional lands we record this podcast, and pay our respects to the elders of the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples, past, present, and emerging.

    Ep #77 Mutual Assistance & The “Value” of the Olympics: This Month on TFS

    Ep #77 Mutual Assistance & The “Value” of the Olympics: This Month on TFS

    And we’re back!

    This week we’d like to introduce our newest Familiar Stranger, Joe Clifford. Joe has just completed his Masters in Development Studies from the University of Auckland!

    To kick off his first panel, Joe discusses his research into the concept of Gotong Royong or mutual assistance in Indonesia. The rest of the Strangers weigh in on the place of these mutual assistance programs and how “mutual” is “mutual assistance”? How much responsibility do you think individuals should have? How much responsibility should the government take when it comes to mutual assistance?

    Clair then raises the topic of the “value” of the Olympics and what it means to the host nation. The Strangers compare the Olympics of the past and how things have changed over time, especially regarding sponsorship and national pride. What do you think about the Olympics? Will you be watching?

    Our Facebook page and Facebook group are back up and running so don’t forget to head over to our Facebook group The Familiar Strange Chats. Let’s keep talking strange, together!

    If you like what we do and are in a position to do so, you can help us to keep making content by supporting us through Patreon.
    Our Patreon can be found at www.patreon.com/thefamiliarstrange
    This anthropology podcast is supported by the Australian Anthropological Society, the ANU’s College of Asia and the Pacific and College of Arts and Social Sciences, and the Australian Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, and is produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

    Music by Pete Dabro: dabro1.bandcamp.com
    Shownotes by Matthew Phung
    Podcast edited by Simon Theobald and Matthew Phung

    • 22 min
    Season Break: A Message from TFS

    Season Break: A Message from TFS

    The team at TFS would like to say thank you to all our listeners this season and to everyone who has listened in to our podcasts and read the blog! We are taking a short season break and we will return with some new and improved content in July!

    But keep an ear out for some special content we recorded last year at the AAS!
    Let’s keep in touch. Feel free to submit something to the blog, we’re always looking for content, and are keen to hear new voices. The submission guidelines are on our website at www.thefamiliarstrange.com/writeforus

    And if you haven’t already, join our Facebook Chats Group, ‘The Familiar Strange Chats’. Whether you’re an anthropologist, a student, or just anthro-interested, we’d love for you to join the conversation.

    Thank you again to all our listeners and readers who have enjoyed our content throughout this season. We hope you have a restful winter break, and we will see you in July.

    Until then, keep Talking Strange…

    • 2 min
    Ep #76 The Sounds of Fieldwork & Choosing Your Fieldsite: This Month on TFS

    Ep #76 The Sounds of Fieldwork & Choosing Your Fieldsite: This Month on TFS

    This week we’d like to introduce a new Familiar Stranger, Jarrod Sim! Jarrod is a PhD student at the school of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University. His current research is an anthropologically-led study of how landscape has shaped the auditory cultures of a Paiwanese community in Taiwan. He investigates and comprehends sound as layered and is interested in its role in contemporary understandings of culture. Welcome Jarrod!

    This week’s panel centres around the various sounds of fieldwork. Jarrod’s work with the Paiwanese community got us thinking about how our respective field sites sounded and how sound is a really integral part of fieldwork. We also dive into the difficulties of conducting ethnomusicology online due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    We then discuss a question sent in by a listener! They wanted to know what kind of considerations the strangers made when choosing a field site and what were some of the practical constraints that had to be considered.

    Our Facebook page and Facebook group are back up and running so don’t forget to head over to our Facebook group The Familiar Strange Chats. Let’s keep talking strange, together!

    If you like what we do and are in a position to do so, you can help us to keep making content by supporting us through Patreon.

    Our Patreon can be found at https://www.patreon.com/thefamiliarstrange

    This anthropology podcast is supported by the Australian Anthropological Society, the ANU’s College of Asia and the Pacific and College of Arts and Social Sciences, and the Australian Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, and is produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

    Music by Pete Dabro: dabro1.bandcamp.com
    Shownotes by Matthew Phung
    Podcast edited by Alex D'Aloia and Matthew Phung

    • 23 min
    Special ANSA Collaboration: Hanne Worsoe and Romy Listo on Fieldwork Trauma and Outsider Witnessing

    Special ANSA Collaboration: Hanne Worsoe and Romy Listo on Fieldwork Trauma and Outsider Witnessing

    This week we bring you a special collaboration between The Familiar Strange and the Australian Network of Student Anthropologists or ANSA. In this special collaboration, Familiar Stranger Alex sits down with Hanne Worsoe and Dr Romy Listo to discuss some of the difficulties that arise from working in particularly intense or distressing field sites. Throughout the conversation they model some of the methods that can benefit new PhD students who are potentially entering into their field work.

    It was a really interesting conversation and thank you again the ANSA for collaborating with us on this project!

    Just a note on sound quality: We conducted this chat over Zoom so the internet and audio quality might vary in some spots. The podcast editing team is working on a solution!

    Quotes

    “It was very effective in helping and supporting people who were about to go into fieldwork or who had just come back from fieldwork”

    “You feel very supported by one person, because you are being listened to and someone’s bearing witness to your experience”

    “I think using these kind of things was really very helpful for me in being able to process some of distress that I felt while I was in the field”

    “It is tough and you really need that capacity to be able to share with someone when you are going through those things it really does help”

    “I think there’s a fear in academia of being able to express vulnerability and difficulty”

    “Everyone had some kind of “war story” so to speak”

    “Everyone had stories from the field that they would often shrug off and minimize”

    “There wasn’t this space or the words to be able to talk about that in the context of research”

    “I think academia needs to acknowledge its vulnerability at a number of different levels, but certainly at a fieldwork level and being affected by fieldwork”

    • 43 min
    Ep #75 The Anthropologists Perspective on Nomadland & Commodified Mothers: This Month of TFS

    Ep #75 The Anthropologists Perspective on Nomadland & Commodified Mothers: This Month of TFS

    This month familiar stranger Tim kicks us off by pondering the ethnographic and anthropological nature of the award winning film Nomadland directed by Chloé Zhao. The strangers discuss the almost anthropological origins of the film and other similar works that deal with the precariat or nomads the movie is based around.

    The strangers then dive into the origins of Mother’s Day and the subsequent commodification of the day itself. They discuss some of the positives and contrast it with a similar “Mother’s day” celebrated on the 27th of May in Bolivia.

    Just a note on sound quality: We are still conducting our panels over Zoom so the internet and audio quality might not be as clear in some places. The podcast editing team is working on a solution!

    Head to our website for a full list of links and citations!

    This anthropology podcast is supported by the Australian Anthropological Society, the ANU’s College of Asia and the Pacific and College of Arts and Social Sciences, and the Australian Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, and is produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

    Music by Pete Dabro: dabro1.bandcamp.com
    Shownotes by Matthew Phung
    Podcast edited by Timothy Johnson and Matthew Phung

    • 24 min
    Ep #74 Colonialism & Monsters: Yasmine Musharbash on Monster Anthropology & Social Transformation

    Ep #74 Colonialism & Monsters: Yasmine Musharbash on Monster Anthropology & Social Transformation

    This week Clair brings you an interview with Dr Yasmine Musharbash! Dr. Yasmine Musharbash is a senior lecturer at the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University. Her fieldwork is based in central Australia, and primarily centred on the Yuendumu, an Aboriginal community about three hours northwest of Alice Springs. Over the years, her research has branched out in an impressive variety of directions, including social relations and personhood of the Warlpiri people, the anthropology of sleep and night, the Anthropology of Emotions, Embodiment, Boredom Studies, death and grieving, and so on.

    Today, we are talking about Yasmine’s research on monster anthropology, which has blossomed into an on-going inter-disciplinary and comparative project that brings together anthropology and monster studies. Her key publications on the subject include two edited volumes Monster Anthropology: Ethnographic Explorations of Transforming Social Worlds Through Monsters (2020 Bloomsbury w/ Dr. Geir Henning Presterudstuen) and Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond (2014 Palgrave Macmillan, w/ Dr. Geir Henning Presterudstuen)

    In this episode, we explore the different ways in which the Aboriginal people live with the monsters that haunt them, in particular in instances of social change and transformation. We first delve into the elementary instability of the term monster, such as how the monstrous bodies rupture classification, transgressing the otherwise clear-cut boundary between taxonomies and how monsters are contingent on the humans they haunt, combining the temporal and spatial perspectives.

    Yasmine then compares and contrasts monster studies versus monster anthropology, before drawing on her fieldwork to investigate how one monster, that cannot be named, morphs and changes alongside the settler colonial state that has been inflicting trauma onto the Aboriginal peoples. We then explore how a more well-known monster, “Pankarlangu”, has adapted to the broader processes of climate change and colonialism, and how the Aboriginal people haunted by it perceive such a transformation. We finally discuss the appropriation of Aboriginal monsters, the clash between different ontologies in fieldwork, and how pandemics and apocalypses may impact on monsters in the Aboriginal country.

    Head to our website for a full list of links and Citations!

    This anthropology podcast is supported by the Australian Anthropological Society, the ANU’s College of Asia and the Pacific and College of Arts and Social Sciences, and the Australian Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, and is produced in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association.

    Music by Pete Dabro: dabro1.bandcamp.com
    Shownotes by Matthew Phung
    Podcast edited by Clair Zhang and Matthew Phung

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

PaulChan24 ,

Insightful discussions on intriguing topics

As a student of anthropology, this podcast keeps me thinking about various topics that I encounter in academia in a more humane and dialectical context!

ChatteringBklyn ,

Provocative thought pieces

We’re not anthropologists but after every episode my husband and I discuss the topic for another hour. So much to think about — that we never thought about before!

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