190 episodes

Jason Wright is on a mission to improve always in ALL ways. In his weekly show he interviews thought leaders, health and wellness experts, entrepreneurs or anyone else he thinks can add to his efforts to improve always in ALL ways. The philosophy is simple. Jason believes if he can reach as close to his full potential as possible it will not only benefit him but his family and community as well. Please tune it, tell your friends, your mom, your grandma, your enemies, your crushes and anyone else you can think of to listen to The Jason Wright show!

The Jason Wright Show Jason Wright

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 39 Ratings

Jason Wright is on a mission to improve always in ALL ways. In his weekly show he interviews thought leaders, health and wellness experts, entrepreneurs or anyone else he thinks can add to his efforts to improve always in ALL ways. The philosophy is simple. Jason believes if he can reach as close to his full potential as possible it will not only benefit him but his family and community as well. Please tune it, tell your friends, your mom, your grandma, your enemies, your crushes and anyone else you can think of to listen to The Jason Wright show!

    Do You Believe in God? Why? Who is Jesus?

    Do You Believe in God? Why? Who is Jesus?

    So an interesting question came through this week in the Vitruvian Letter. So I did my best to answer. It was a big enough question I thought I’d share it as well as my answer here on the JWS.







    If you are not a subscriber of The Vitruvian Letter, you can become one HERE. I hope you will check it out. Thanks for listening.







    Also, please give me a follow on Insta @jasonwrightnow







    Keep endeavoring to ‘Improve always in ALL ways!”

    • 41 min
    August 5, 2022 Improve Your Focus Always in ALL Ways With a Word From Dr. Andrew Humberman

    August 5, 2022 Improve Your Focus Always in ALL Ways With a Word From Dr. Andrew Humberman

    August 5, 2022 Improve Your Focus Always in ALL Ways With a Word From Dr. Andrew Humberman







    For complete Huberman episode referenced in this episode click below👇👇👇👇👇



















    Winter, 1914.The Belgium landscape looked like the haunted forest from a child’s nightmare. Once-verdant vegetation and trees were stripped and scorched, desolated by artillery fire.Relentless rain called for makeshift bridges, built so soldiers could traverse the mud bogs and continue the push on the Western front.But the rain was slick. Soldiers slipped, their shoulders heavily laden with gear. The mud swallowed their legs, rendering them paralyzed Comrades reached in to pull them out. Shells showered overhead. The smell of chlorine––chemical warfare––was overwhelming, overpowered only by the stench emanating from piles of the fallen surrounding them.Their efforts to free their flailing comrades from the mud failed. Occasionally, as they scrambled to save them, the mud would claim another victim. The sinking soldiers were left behind. Hellfire above them, unable to move, before suffocating, they had hours to sink. The panic, fear, and helplessness drove some of them to the edge of insanity. And the mud swallowed them whole.Of all the difficult and dangerous battlefields of history, the Flanders Trenches during the winter of 1914 tops the list. Military scholars tell us that this is due to a single reason:World War I marked a historical intersection of modern weapons with medieval strategy.Similarly, the 21st century marks a historical intersection of modern technology with ancient biology.There’s a war going on for your attention. And it’s relentless.According to the data, most of us are drowning in the mess and mud; the average knowledge worker is interrupted every 11 minutes, checks their inboxes 56 times per day, and completes 1.5 hours of work per day.If you don’t protect your consciousness, you’ll risk becoming a casualty.The good news? Unlike WWI, the damage from today’s weapons––smartphones, laptops, social media, VR gaming devices––is self-inflicted. This means the attention war is winnable.So what causes all this wasted attention in the first place?In one word:Distraction.We know by now that distraction stresses us out, makes us dumber, blunts our empathy, and fragments our attention. So in this series, we’ll focus primarily on the distinctions that are most relevant to flow.Neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley defines distractions as “goal-irrelevant information that we either encounter in our external surroundings or generate internally within our minds.”The operative word here is “information.”We’re wired to crave information. In primates, the brain responds to new information like how it responds to food. This served our ancestors because new information was a matter of life or death.Learning that a lion was lurking in the bushes––new information––was more important than staying focused. In a crisis like that, ignoring Simba and finishing a task would be fatal. This is partly why our information-seeking drive is stronger than top-down cognitive control––attention, working memory, and goal management.What’s happening under the hood here?It starts with the nucleus accumbens––a cluster of nerve cells underneath the cerebral cortex. Neuroscientists often refer to it as the brain’s pleasure center. It’s the region that lights up when gamblers place a bet, drug addicts snort, or when people have orgasms.The likelihood that an activity will lead to addiction links to 1) how fast it releases dopamine, 2) the intensity of that release, and 3) the reliability of that release.Inhaling or injecting a drug––as opposed to swallowing a pill––produces a faster and stronger dopamine release. Social media, smartphones, and modern-day tech act similarly. They’re designed to cause a dopamine surge in the nucleus accumbens as fast as ...

    • 49 min
    Improve Your Chances of Becoming a Millionaire Always in ALL Ways

    Improve Your Chances of Becoming a Millionaire Always in ALL Ways

    In 2004, I set out to conduct a five-year “Rich Habits” study to explore how the world’s wealthiest people think about their money. Each of the 233 millionaires I interviewed fell into one of four categories:







    Saver-Investors: No matter what their day job is, they make saving and investing part of their daily routine. They are constantly thinking about smart ways to grow their wealth.







    Company Climbers: Climbers work for a large company and devote all of their time and energy to climbing the corporate ladder until they land a senior executive position — with an extremely high salary.







    Virtuosos: They are among the best at what they do, and they’re paid a high premium for their knowledge and expertise. Formal education, such as advanced degrees (e.g., in law or medicine), is usually a requirement.







    Dreamers: The individuals in this group are all in pursuit of a dream, such starting their own business, becoming a successful actor, musician or best-selling author. Dreamers love what they do for a living, and their passion shows up in their bank accounts.







    The Saver-Investor route requires the least amount of risk — at least compared to pursuing an entrepreneurial dream or artistic passion. But 88% of the millionaires I interviewed said that saving in particular was critical to their long-term financial success. 







    It took the average millionaire in my study between 12 to 32 years to accumulate a net worth of anywhere from $3 million to $7 million.







    Below are their three most common habits that anyone can adopt:







    1. They automated, and saved 20% of net pay.







    Every Saver-Investor in my study consistently saved 20% or more of their net pay, each paycheck. 







    Many accomplished this by automating the withdrawal of a fixed percentage of their net pay. Typically, 10% went into employer-sponsored retirement accounts and the other 10% was automatically directed into a separate savings account.







    Once a month, the Saver-Investors would then transfer their accumulated 10% monthly savings into an investment account, such as a brokerage account.







    Even if 20% is too steep at the moment, saving a smaller percentage consistently can still help you meet your financial goals for the future.







    2. They regularly invested a portion of their savings.







    Because Saver-Investors consistently invested their savings, their money compounded over time. When they started, this compound interest was not very significant. But after 10 years, they began to accumulate significant wealth. Towards the final years of their working lives, the Saver-Investors’ wealth grew to an average of $3.3 million.  







    The millionaires who pursued a dream and started a business (a.k.a. the Dreamer-Entrepreneurs) did not have the ability to invest their savings, particularly in the early stages of pursuing their dreams. Whatever savings they did have were used as working capital in order to fund their dream.







    Interestingly, however, once most of these Dreamer-Entrepreneur achieved success in the form of available cash flow, they immediately pivoted and began to invest their earnings.







    3. They were extremely frugal.







    One of the common denominators for Saver-Investors,

    • 39 min
    July 29, 2022 Best Friday Ever #BFE With John Landes. Pickleball, Monkeypox, Recession and The Happiest Kingdom on Earth

    July 29, 2022 Best Friday Ever #BFE With John Landes. Pickleball, Monkeypox, Recession and The Happiest Kingdom on Earth

    The Happiness Index







    Bhutan (The Happy Kingdom)







    Pickleball







    After playing golf one Saturday during the summer, Joel Pritchard, congressman from Washington State and Bill Bell, successful businessman, returned to Pritchard’s home on Bainbridge Island, WA (near Seattle) to find their families sitting around with nothing to do. The property had an old badminton court so Pritchard and Bell looked for some badminton equipment and could not find a full set of rackets. They improvised and started playing with ping-pong paddles and a perforated plastic ball. At first they placed the net at badminton height of 60 inches and volleyed the ball over the net.As the weekend progressed, the players found that the ball bounced well on the asphalt surface and soon the net was lowered to 36 inches. The following weekend, Barney McCallum was introduced to the game at Pritchard’s home. Soon, the three men created rules, relying heavily on badminton. They kept in mind the original purpose, which was to provide a game that the whole family could play together.















    Rep. Joel Pritchard







    1967







    The first permanent pickleball court was constructed in the backyard of Joel Pritchard’s friend and neighbor, Bob O’Brian.







    1972







    A corporation was formed to protect the creation of this new sport.















    Original Pickleball Court







    1975







    The National Observer published an article about pickleball followed by a 1976 article in Tennis magazine about “America’s newest racquet sport.”







    1976







    During the spring of 1976, the first known pickleball tournament in the world was held at South Center Athletic Club in Tukwila, Washington. David Lester won Men’s Singles and Steve Paranto placed second. Many of the participants were college tennis players who knew very little about pickleball. In fact, they practiced with large wood paddles and a softball sized plastic ball.







    1978







    The book, The Other Raquet Sports, was published and included information about pickleball.







    1982







    Pickleball pioneer, Sid Williams began playing and organizing tournaments in Washington state.







    1984







    The United States Amateur Pickleball Association (U.S.A.P.A.) was organized to perpetuate the growth and advancement of pickleball on a national level. The first rulebook was published in March 1984.







    The first Executive Director and President of U.S.A.P.A. was Sid Williams who served from 1984 to 1998. He was followed by Frank Candelario who kept things going until 2004.







    The first composite paddle was made by Arlen Paranto, a Boeing Industrial Engineer. He used the fiberglass/nomex honeycomb panels that commercial airlines use for their floors and part of the airplane’s structural system. Arlen made about 1,000 paddles from fiberglass/honeycomb core and graphite/honeycomb core materials until he sold the company to Frank Candelario.







    1990







    Pickleball was being played in all 50 states.







    1992







    Pickle-Ball, Inc. manufactured pickleballs in-house with a custom drilling ...

    • 44 min
    July 26, 20022 -The Mindset of a Champion With Former Major League Baseball Player and Founder of Major League Mindset Brandon Guyer

    July 26, 20022 -The Mindset of a Champion With Former Major League Baseball Player and Founder of Major League Mindset Brandon Guyer

    This conversation could have gone on for hours. Brandon Guyer speaks the language of excellence with perfect articulation. A guy who exudes what Dr. Carol Dweck calls a growth mindset, Brandon has shown having a champion mindset will allow you to leverage to the highest degree your physical talents.







    There is so much wisdom packed into this conversation you may want to listen more than once. Enjoy the show!















    BRANDON’S BASEBALL JOURNEY



















































    MORE ABOUT BRANDON







    “I was that kid who played outside until called for dinner. I loved and played every sport, but there was just something special about baseball. I knew early on it was my true passion and I set out to be the very best version of myself. This was a series of trial and error stories.







    I came to realize that hitting more balls and lifting more weights wasn’t the answer for me. To achieve greatness, I knew I needed to seek and acquire tools I felt were essential in my development as a well rounded person and player. So, that’s what I did. I became OBSESSED with learning ways to improve. It started with nutrition, and finding ways to fuel my body for success. It wasn’t an overnight success either. Nutritional training soon turned into mental training, and functional physical training specific to baseball. If it could help me get to the next level, I was all in.







    I feel blessed to say I’m a 7 year veteran of Major League Baseball. It’s something I am very proud of. Of course I would have loved to play 20+ years, but it wasn’t in the cards, and I’m at peace with that. When I sit back and reflect on what I could have done differently, I can honestly say there’s nothing. I gave my all every single day and earned everything I was able to achieve. My scholarship to the University of Virginia, my promotions in the minor leagues, my call to the show, my role as a player in the bigs. I worked for literally everything.







    Today I’m better for it. I’m grateful for the demotions and the promotions. I’m grateful for the strike outs and the home runs, for the hits I got robbed of and the ones that blooped in. I’m grateful for the losses and the wins, the struggles and the triumphs, the successes and failures. I’m grateful for the joy and the tears, and for the beginning and the end. I’m grateful for all of that because now I have the experience and knowledge to pass onto you.”

    • 53 min
    July 22, 2022 'Best Friday Ever' Finding Your Way Through the Valley, Exercise and its Impact on Death of ANY kind

    July 22, 2022 'Best Friday Ever' Finding Your Way Through the Valley, Exercise and its Impact on Death of ANY kind

    *Battling demons and recovering. Dr. Dan Crawford finds his way back







    *”Comfort Crisis” by Michael Easter is a must read







    * Peter Attia and the power of exercise (Credit Joe Rogan Experience) This is just a little way to button up the week. I hope you have a great week and continue to improve always in ALL ways #PeterAttia #MichaelEaster #Improvealwaysinallways #longevity

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

grimxsoldier ,

Meaningful podcast with an easy flow

Jason’s podcast covers a variety of topics that almost anyone can relate to. It’s incredibly easy to follow along and you get a lot out of it.

Recman11 ,

Great show

Humor mixed with wisdom and real life impact.

AnnS3 of8 ,

Foregiveness?

You should be more careful when having guests come on and tell the world about how someone else feels. Alesha Penland has no idea about how Tisha and her family have suffered through this travesty. They are sad for her loss but it was not caused by Tisha. Tisha and her family suffer every day she spends in jail unable to raise or even see her children.

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