20 episodes

This podcast is hosted by two instruction librarians that are interested in sharing their experiences teaching information literacy, discussing current trends, and having meaningful conversations about librarianship.

The Librarian's Guide to Teaching Amanda Piekart

    • Education
    • 4.8, 6 Ratings

This podcast is hosted by two instruction librarians that are interested in sharing their experiences teaching information literacy, discussing current trends, and having meaningful conversations about librarianship.

    Faculty Collaboration

    Faculty Collaboration

    Show Notes:

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica are talking about our experiences with faculty collaboration in the classroom.

    Topics & Takeaways:


    Faculty collaborations with librarians can range from individual outreach that leads to a one-shot session to a full collaboration on courses or assignment design.

    We’ve experienced challenging situations ranging from interruptions in class, negative responses to our work to completely taking over class.

    We can work towards changing the library/faculty collaboration culture by advocating for being seen as equals, changing our language from supporting to collaborating, moving away from the service model and educating faculty on what we really do in libraries.


    Tips on successful faculty collaboration:


    Take initiative and don’t wait for faculty to reach out to you.

    Keep your ‘ears” to the ground and look for ways for to seize opportunities


    to get involved.


    Be open minded to different partnerships and collaborations.

    We need to have a purpose in every project we take on.

    Breaking down silos is super hard but we are the only ones who are going to do it. We need to just keep advocating, keep pushing back.


    Resources referenced in this episode:


    Empowerment, Experimentation, Engagement: Embracing Partnership Models in Libraries by Brian Mathews, Stefanie Metko and Patrick Tomlin in EDUCAUSE

    Five tips for better faculty-librarian communication and collaboration by Bruce Rosenstein on EmeraldPublishing.com

    Kevin Seeber Blog

    Happier with Gretchen Rubin

    Streaks App

    The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin


    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Talking Librarianship with Melissa Wong

    Talking Librarianship with Melissa Wong

    Show Notes:

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica speak with librarian and library science professor, Melissa Wong, about instructional design, topics from her book, “Instructional Design for LIS Professionals” and remote teaching during COVID.

    Topics & Takeaways:

    (Listen to the episode one more time)

    Resources referenced in this episode:


    LIS Conversations After Class: Melissa’s website and blog

    Information Literacy at a (Social) Distance: Strategies for Moving Online - Melissa Wong’s ACRL Webinar

    CAST - Universal Design for Learning

    It's open access, but is it accessible? Creating and selecting items for digital accessibility by Rebecca Graham

    Algorithms of Oppression by Safiya Noble

    Missed Connections: What Search Engines Say About Women by Safiya Noble

    Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science

    Springshare Accessibility Blog Posts

    LibVoices: Nicole Cooke Episode

    Timeline JS Tool

    Padlet Tool

    5 Things You Should Read About Universal Design for Learning (ACRL)

    Studying Research Blog by Allison Hosier


    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go 

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 52 min
    Reflective Teaching Practices

    Reflective Teaching Practices

    Show Notes:

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk about reflective teaching, some ideas about journaling and improving our professional practices through reflection.

    Topics & Takeaways:


    We improve the more we teach but can we make more opportunities to learn from our teaching through reflection? How do we actively learn about our teaching or professional self to grow from it?

    Instruction journals allow librarians to get thoughts out about what went well, what did I think I could improve or were there any interesting student interactions in order to reflect and look for patterns.

    Brainstorm journals that are reviewed frequently can be another form of journal.

    Librarian to librarian observation and feedback can be a system-level way to learn about your instruction and reflect on it with help from others.

    Feedback from faculty and students can be helpful, with a few caveats.

    Just writing down things you learned each day for about 15 minutes can improve our learning.


    Resources referenced in this episode:


    Reflective Teaching for Librarians by Char Booth; American Libraries

    Instruction Journal Template

    Reflecting Journaling: A Daily Practice by Amanda Leftwich; LibParlor

    Explanation Effect: Why You Should Always Teach What You Learn by Michael Simmons; Medium.com

    Reflective Teaching by  Yale Center for Teaching and Learning

    Word cloud evaluation tweet by Jess Calarco

     Feedback 360 LibGuide


    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 36 min
    Gamification in Information Literacy Instruction: Tips, Tricks and how to get started!

    Gamification in Information Literacy Instruction: Tips, Tricks and how to get started!

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk to librarians, Serene Rock and Kristine Cwengros, about gamification in information literacy instruction and their poster that was presented at the ACRL DLS Virtual Poster Session last month.

    Resources referenced in this episode:


    Epidemics and Hunger Games: Collaborating to Gamify Information Literacy…and Maybe Save the World - Poster & Resource LibGUide by Serene Rock and Kristine Cwengros

    Games and Gamification in Academic Libraries - Book by Stephanie Crowe & Eva Sclippa

    Andrew Walsh Twitter: @playbrarian

    Work Life Balance by Adam Grant


    Topics & Takeaways:


    Make gaming relevant to the course objectives and students have a variety of benefits including increasing student motivation and content retention.

    Effective games provide students scaffolding throughout the process to help move through the game and practice skills.

    Don’t be afraid to fail and adapt!

    Start small - no need to create a multi-level game on day 1! Start with a pre-created Jeopardy game or a Kahoot or a 10 minute group game in a larger class session.

    When asking for faculty collaboration, providing them with a fleshed out idea may increase the potential for a positive response.


    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go 

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 38 min
    ACRL Framework Series: Part III- What does the Future Hold for the Frames?

    ACRL Framework Series: Part III- What does the Future Hold for the Frames?

    Show Notes:

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica wrap up their 3-part series about the ACRL Framework by looking forward to the future. They discuss when and how the ACRL Framework might be refreshed and some ways it could be changed.

    Topics & Takeaways:


    Potential Refreshes & Updates Discussed:


    A large scale study to determine adoption rates and barriers to adoption

    Updating the language of the descriptions

    Reorganizing the dispositions

    Renaming the Framework

    Adding real world examples




    Resources referenced in this episode:


    Community College Librarians and the ACRL Framework: Findings from a National Study published in College & Research Libraries by Susan Wengler and Christine Wolff-Eisenberg (2020)

    “Information Literacy’s Third Wave” by Barbara Fister, published on InsideHigherEd.com (2019)

    “Side-by-Side Mode for Screen-Sharing” - Zoom.com

    ACRL Framework and Standards Alignment Document by Amanda Hovious

    AACU Values Rubric


    Special thanks to our listeners whose responses we shared:


    @blinablevitan

    Sarah Burns-Feyl

    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 38 min
    ACRL Framework Series-Part II: Likes, Dislikes and Favorite Frames

    ACRL Framework Series-Part II: Likes, Dislikes and Favorite Frames

    Show Notes:

    In this episode, Amanda and Jessica continue the 3-part ACRL Framework series. They discuss interesting examples of librarians using the Framework, studies that are based around it as well as their favorite Frames.

    Resources referenced in this episode:


    The Sift Newsletter from News Literacy Project

    Bias Busters: bringing Wikipedia Edit-a-thons to the Classroom for Hispanic Heritage Month (Poster by Laurie McFadden, Jessica Kiebler & Bonnie Lafazan)

    Student Constructions of Authority in the Framework Era: A Bibliometric Pilot Study Using a Faceted Taxonomy by James W. Rosenzweig, Mary Thill, and Frank Lambert published in College & Research Libraries, 2019

    New Discoveries in Reference: The 25th Annual Reference Research Forum - ALA Annual 2019 Presentation by Julie Hunter, Jessica Kiebler, Dina Meky and Samantha Kannegiser

    Chat reference: evaluating customer service and IL instruction published in Reference Services Review by Julie Hunter, Jessica Kiebler, Dina Meky and Samantha Kannegiser (2019)

    Beyond CRAAP: An Updated Approach to Source Evaluation LibGuide

    Reorienting an Information Literacy Program Toward Social Justice: Mapping the Core Values of Librarianship to the ACRL Framework published in Communications in Information Literacy by Lua Gregory and Shana Higgins (2017)

    Community College Librarians and the ACRL Framework: Findings from a National Study published in College & Research Libraries by Susan Wengler and Christine Wolff-Eisenberg (2020)

    ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education


    This episode's theme music:

    Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go

    Here's where you can find us:

    Podcast: @Librarian_Guide

    Jessica: @LibraryGeek611

    Amanda: @HistoryBuff820

    Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com

    Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

librariandee ,

Library Instruction

I am so happy I found your podcast about library instruction via Twitter today. I used to listen to “Adventures in library instruction” a long time ago and I learned so much! The first two episodes have helped already by introducing me to LibWizard and reminding me to use Kahoot! In my high school research lessons. Thanks again and keep up the good work.

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