80 episodes

This podcast series will engage in a pursuit of knowledge on topics ranging from the nanoscale to the polar icecaps and everything in between.

The world can be complex, fascinating and daunting all at the same time.

The Maine Question will explore ways to navigate and make sense of today’s world.

We’ll look at how UMaine researchers and students do what they do, what it means for Maine and the world, and why they are passionate about their work.

The Maine Question The Maine Question

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

This podcast series will engage in a pursuit of knowledge on topics ranging from the nanoscale to the polar icecaps and everything in between.

The world can be complex, fascinating and daunting all at the same time.

The Maine Question will explore ways to navigate and make sense of today’s world.

We’ll look at how UMaine researchers and students do what they do, what it means for Maine and the world, and why they are passionate about their work.

    ‘The Maine Question’ season seven recap

    ‘The Maine Question’ season seven recap

    Season seven of “The Maine Question” podcast covered a broad variety of subjects in research and higher education. Topics ranged from archaeology to space research, and from the challenges in K–12 education to toxic forever chemicals and efforts to mitigate them.

    In the 10th and final episode this season, host Ron Lisnet looks back on the big UMaine stories he shared, all of which reflect the extensive research activity, learning opportunities and public outreach generated by Maine’s public, R1-designated institution.

    • 30 min
    What new frontiers await for Maine’s space economy?

    What new frontiers await for Maine’s space economy?

    University of Maine research and education have ascended beyond Earth’s atmosphere since the 1990s. For example, UMaine scientists have tested the latest hypervelocity decelerators for NASA space travel and created a wireless leak detection system for the International Space Station. Through its latest inventions and studies, and scholarship and fellowship programs, UMaine plays a critical role in advancing the state’s space economy and training future leaders in the aerospace industry. But the university is far from reaching its final frontier.

    In recent years, UMaine researchers have been developing the state's first small research satellite with the University of Southern Maine and three K–12 schools. The university also launched a multipronged, multidisciplinary initiative to support research and development in space science and engineering with help from non-STEM researchers. At the same time, a Maine SpacePort Complex for nanosatellite production and other research is in development.

    In this episode of “The Maine Question,” Ali Abedi, UMaine associate vice president for research and professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Ph.D. student Joseph Patton discuss what new frontiers await Maine’s space economy and the university.

    • 23 min
    What is the legacy and future of the Climate Change Institute?

    What is the legacy and future of the Climate Change Institute?

    The nation’s first multi- and inter-disciplinary research institute to study Earth’s recent and long-term climate variability was founded in 1972 at the University of Maine. That institute, now known as the Climate Change Institute, is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, a milestone that honors the many groundbreaking discoveries its scientists have made in the field of climate science.

    CCI have scientists first mapped the difference between climate during the Ice Age and today in the 1970s; discovered the importance of marine-based ice sheets in the 1980s; connected acid rain to human causes in the mid-1980s; uncovered the concept of abrupt climate change through studying ice cores in Greenland in the mid-1990s; and led expeditions traversing Antarctica to determine the impact of human-sourced pollutants into the 2010s.

    In this week’s episode of “The Maine Question,” CCI director Paul Andrew Mayewski and researchers Daniel Sandweiss and Cynthia Isenhour discuss the legacy of the institute and its future of discoveries and contributions that will help tackle the all-encompassing challenge of global warming worldwide.

    • 45 min
    How can business savvy help Maine farmers succeed?

    How can business savvy help Maine farmers succeed?

    Like opening any business, starting and operating a farm can be challenging without any in-depth entrepreneurial knowledge or skills. To help strengthen support for farmers' business skills, University of Maine faculty members Erin Percival Carter and Stephanie Welcomer established the Business, Agriculture, and Rural Development (BARD) technical assistance training program in the Maine Business School.

    The BARD program trains UMaine students to serve as consultants for farmers and operators of other small-scale and sustainable agricultural businesses. These students can assist agribusinesses with various aspects of commerce, such as data-management, price-setting, marketing, financial and strategic forecasting, market segmentation, product development, market intelligence and consumer research.

    The BARD program recently received a $292,000 award from the Small Business Administration that was requested by U.S. Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King through the FY22 Congressionally Directed Spending process, known as earmarks.

    In this episode of “The Maine Question,” Carter, an assistant professor of marketing, discusses how business savvy can help farms succeed.

    • 29 min
    What is living on a college campus like in 2022?

    What is living on a college campus like in 2022?

    There are about 3,500 students living on the University of Maine campus, many of whom have spent much of their high school or early college years learning remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the transition to in-person learning and socializing has been daunting to some first-year and returning students.

    In recent years, the Division of Student Life has retooled and doubled down on their services to help students adjust to college life during the pandemic and preserve a sense of community on campus. According to the division, participation in on-campus activities has significantly increased this fall compared to years past, but so has the demand for mental health, socialization and other services.

    In this episode of “The Maine Question” podcast, Ben Evans, assistant director of campus activities at UMaine, and Lauri Sidelko, assistant dean in student life, discuss what life on campus is like for students in 2022.

    • 23 min
    How can studying the humanities benefit society?

    How can studying the humanities benefit society?

    How can studying the humanities benefit society? by The Maine Question

    • 14 min

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9 Ratings

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