22 episodes

Produced by Partners for Dignity & Rights, we explore and celebrate the work of poor people's movements, particularly in the US. We highlight innovative and powerful organizing campaigns and community building led by women, LGBTQ folks, Black communities and other people of color, that are pushing the boundaries and have the potential to transform this society.Hosted by Max Rameau, a Haitian-born Pan-African theorist, campaign strategist, organizer, author and member of Pan-African Community Action.

The Next World Partners for Dignity & Rights

    • News
    • 4.6 • 10 Ratings

Produced by Partners for Dignity & Rights, we explore and celebrate the work of poor people's movements, particularly in the US. We highlight innovative and powerful organizing campaigns and community building led by women, LGBTQ folks, Black communities and other people of color, that are pushing the boundaries and have the potential to transform this society.Hosted by Max Rameau, a Haitian-born Pan-African theorist, campaign strategist, organizer, author and member of Pan-African Community Action.

    Black Land and Black Liberation with Njera Keith and Kristina Brown of 400+1

    Black Land and Black Liberation with Njera Keith and Kristina Brown of 400+1

    On this episode, we talk with Njera Keith and Kristina Brown, the co-founders and Ministers of Cohesion of 400+1, a Black cooperative federation based in Texas. Together, we discuss reproductive justice, creating and holding Black space, revolutionary organizing, vanguardism, and gender politics in social movements.

    Njera Keith is a Diaspora oriented Black organizer whose focus is the development of movement philosophy and infrastructure that supports cohesion and unity in revolutionary struggle. She is the Founder and Executive Coordinator of Black Sovereign Nation, a pro-Black, autonomy-focused, and community-centered organization based in Austin, Texas. She is also the co-founder of 400+1, the world’s first Black cooperative federation, a liberatory blueprint, and a framework for dramatic economic and political shifts in global Black life.
    Kristina Brown is a social epidemiologist by training with a specialty in the identification and assessment of disparities (race and gender). Principally oriented in Black revolutionary struggle, Kristina is fascinated by the utility of spirit, culture and communications to define and cultivate a revolutionary agenda. Invested in applying her skills and empowering her community, she is the co-founder and executive director of Counter Balance: ATX. Counter Balance: ATX is a grassroots non-profit organization purposed to improving the quality of life of women of the global majority and impoverished women, by reimagining Black women's relationship to themselves and the world that impacts them. Most recently, Kristina co-founded 400+1; the world's first Black cooperative federation and Counter Balance's parent organization, to build economic and political power across the Diaspora. It is her hope that this framework will be the vehicle for mass movement and result in propelling Black folx to a world unimaginable, beyond survival. Kristina is currently exploring how sensory-based experiences can improve the health of the Diasporic consciousness. This includes information about what we are naming as healing habits that result in a holistic resistance to the impacts of racialized oppression.

    You can read more about the topics we discussed at these links:

    400+1's Spring Manifesto
    400+1's 2021 Liberated Zone /Occupation
    400+1's Reproductive Revolution Manifesto
    400+1 About Us
    400+1 Linktree
    Njera Keith Linktree
    Njera Keith article in the Nation
    400+1 Orisha Land
    See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Stay subscribed to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation.

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights, as well as dignityinschools.org.
    Please subscribe and spread the word. You can find our archives here, or on nearly all podcast platforms.
    Support the show

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Hurricane Katrina, Education Justice, and Finding your Sanctuary, with Ruth Idakula of Dignity in Schools Campaign

    Hurricane Katrina, Education Justice, and Finding your Sanctuary, with Ruth Idakula of Dignity in Schools Campaign

    Seventeen years after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, join us in exploring the legacy of Katrina and education justice. In conversation with host Max Rameau is Ruth Idakula, Program Director of Dignity in Schools Campaign.

    Ruth discusses the principles of restorative justice, New Orleans schools after Hurricane Katrina, how to sustain yourself in this work, and her own path from a childhood in Nigeria to organizing in New Orleans.

    For nearly two decades, Ruth S. Idakula has dedicated her life energy to organizing, education and advocacy for social, racial, and economic justice and equity. Born and raised in Nigeria, Ruth has been a resident of New Orleans for over 23 years. As a proud mother of three sons, she was called into public education organizing, advocacy and policy development by the blatantly racist takeover and privatization of public schools in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Ruth’s leadership is grounded in sustaining spiritual practices and she serves as a faith leader, religious educator, and facilitator for collective liberation in New Orleans and beyond. She is building a beautiful garden sanctuary in her backyard – and invites everyone to figure out what sustains you, what gives you life – and be not afraid to go do that!

    See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Stay subscribed to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation.

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights, as well as dignityinschools.org.
    Please subscribe and spread the word. You can find our archives here, or on nearly all podcast platforms.
    Support the show

    • 57 min
    Art and Abolition With Bryonn Bain, Author of Rebel Speak: A Justice Movement Mixtape

    Art and Abolition With Bryonn Bain, Author of Rebel Speak: A Justice Movement Mixtape

    Join us in exploring art and abolition, with host Max Rameau and artist, professor, writer, and prison abolitionist Bryonn Bain.

    Bryonn talks with Max about his new book Rebel Speak: A Justice Movement Mixtape, and the multimedia production of his play Lyrics from Lockdown,  playing at the Apollo Theatre on August 29th. They also discuss the Prison Industrial Complex, organizing through the arts, the importance of mental health, and influences; including Albert Woodfox, Lani Gunier, and Kellis Parker. Artists mentioned include Maya Jupiter,  Liberation Family (artist Chen Lo) & Suckerpunch (Mic Crenshaw).

    Bryonn Bain is Brooklyn’s own prison activist, actor, hip hop theater innovator and spoken word poetry champion.  Described by Cornel West as an artist who “...speaks his truth with a power we desperately need to hear,” his theater, film and television work are critically acclaimed – from his award winning BET talk show “My Two Cents,” and Emmy nomination for “BaaadDDD Sonia,” to this year’s Emmy award for “LA Stories.” Playing over 40 characters in his one-man theater production, Lyrics From Lockdown is executive produced by Harry Belafonte (“BlacKkKlansman”), and tells the story of Bain’s wrongful imprisonment through hip hop theater, spoken word poetry, blues, calypso, comedy and letters exchanged with fellow poet and friend, Nanon Williams – who was wrongfully sentenced to Death Row at just 17 years old.
    Wrongfully imprisoned in his second year at Harvard Law, Bryonn sued the NYPD, and told his story for 20 million viewers on "60 Minutes" in an interview with Mike Wallace. After writing The Village Voice cover story “Walking While Black: The Bill of Rights for Black America,” his work received the largest response in the history of the nation's most widely read progressive newspaper. Bain produced the Lyrics on Lockdown Tour, which reached 25 states, and spawned higher education courses using the performing arts to build literacy in prisons nationwide.  For the decade that followed, Bain taught courses using the arts on Rikers Island penal colony. After teaching hip hop, spoken word and theater at Harvard, Bain founded the prison education program at NYU to offer higher education and college degrees to men incarcerated in upstate New York. Bryonn founded and directs the Prison Education Program at UCLA, where he has developed and taught arts-based courses and programs in LA prisons including the California Institute for Women, Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall, Camp Joseph Scott and Central Juvenile Hall. 

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights. See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Subscribe to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation. 
    Support the show

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Where Food Justice Meets Black Liberation, With Savi Horne and Fred Carter

    Where Food Justice Meets Black Liberation, With Savi Horne and Fred Carter

    On this episode, we discuss the intersection where food justice meets Black liberation. Joining host Max Rameau are Mama Savi Horne and Baba Fred Carter, two organizers who are also on the board of the National Black Food & Justice Alliance.

    Baba Fred Carter works with Black Oaks Center for Sustainable Renewable Living, a 40 acre off-grid eco campus in Illinois that is engaged in a campaign against NICOR to stop the development of a pipeline and push for a Renewable Pembroke. Baba Fred is chair of the National Black Food & Justice Alliance.
    Mama Savi Horne works with Land Loss Prevention Project, a law firm and advocacy organization for farmers and land stewards, which has provided assistance and resources to those at threat of losing their land, as well as engaged in the advocacy and support around debt relief for Black farmers. Mama Savi is co-chair of the National Black Food & Justice Alliance.

    Baba Fred Carter talks about how the murder of his cousin Emmet Till affected his family, the power of your plate, Monsanto, and being inspired by a new generation of activists. Mama Savi Horne discusses what choices mean when it comes to food, the struggle against Black land loss, the right to food, and food access.

    See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Stay subscribed to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation.

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights.
    Please subscribe, spread the word, and support the show.
    Support the show

    • 58 min
    Solidarity With Haiti! With Mamyrah Prosper of Community Movement Builders - Part Two

    Solidarity With Haiti! With Mamyrah Prosper of Community Movement Builders - Part Two

    On this episode, part two of a two part interview, Mamyrah Prosper discusses the aftermath of the assassination of Haitian president Jovenel Moïse, as well as grassroots responses. This interview was recorded just days before the recent earthquake added to the turmoil in Haiti.
    Mamyrah Prosper is International Coordinator for Community Movement Builders, and Assistant Professor of Global and International Studies at UC Irvine. She immigrated to the U.S. from Haiti at age 15, leaving her parents behind, and moved in with her sister’s family in New Jersey. 
    Following a family tradition of activism for social justice – her father was a human and labor rights activist – she champions causes including women’s rights, affordable housing and land rights. Her doctoral dissertation focuses on the Haitian Platform for Advocacy for an Alternative Development, a central social movement for social justice in Haiti.
    Outside of the classroom, Mamyrah has volunteered at Take Back the Land, the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, and the Correctional Association of New York. During her time at FIU, she helped organize two conferences on Afro-Latino social movements and feminist reimaginings of the nation that involved academics, students, activists and performing artists. She also served as a teaching assistant and lecturer. Mamyrah has authored and co-authored dozens of peer-reviewed book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles, book reviews and encyclopedia entries.

    See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Stay subscribed to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation.

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights.
    Support the show (https://dignityandrights.org/donate/)

    • 1 hr 7 min
    What is Happening in Haiti? With Mamyrah Prosper of Community Movement Builders - Part One

    What is Happening in Haiti? With Mamyrah Prosper of Community Movement Builders - Part One

    On this episode, part one of a two part interview, Mamyrah Prosper discusses her personal history as the daughter of a political prisoner in Haiti through her movement activism and work as a scholar, as well as recent Haitian political history, from the Duvaliers through Jovenel Moïse. Stay tuned for part two, as we discuss the assassination of Moïse and the aftermath, as well as grassroots responses.
    Mamyrah Prosper is International Coordinator for Community Movement Builders, and Assistant Professor of Global and International Studies at UC Irvine. She immigrated to the U.S. from Haiti at age 15, leaving her parents behind, and moved in with her sister’s family in New Jersey. 
    Following a family tradition of activism for social justice – her father was a human and labor rights activist – she champions causes including women’s rights, affordable housing and land rights. Her doctoral dissertation focuses on the Haitian Platform for Advocacy for an Alternative Development, a central social movement for social justice in Haiti.
    Outside of the classroom, Mamyrah has volunteered at Take Back the Land, the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, and the Correctional Association of New York. During her time at FIU, she helped organize two conferences on Afro-Latino social movements and feminist reimaginings of the nation that involved academics, students, activists and performing artists. She also served as a teaching assistant and lecturer. Mamyrah has authored and co-authored dozens of peer-reviewed book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles, book reviews and encyclopedia entries.

    See more of the work of host Max Rameau at pacapower.org. Stay subscribed to The Next World for more news from the frontlines of movements for justice and liberation.

    You can read more about the issues we explore on our podcast and much more at dignityandrights.org, the website of Partners for Dignity & Rights.
    Please subscribe, spread the word, and support the show.
    Support the show (https://dignityandrights.org/donate/)

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

addycarp ,

Dream Team hosts and timely conversations

Puck Lo and Lewis Wallace are a dream team. We absolutely need more of this type of journalism and these types of conversations in this format. So impressed and can’t wait to keep hearing what’s in store!

Secondlines ,

We need more of this

This is an important contribution to movement journalism