34 episodes

Hosted by Tim Gihring, "The Object" podcast explores the surprising, true stories behind museum objects, touching on immigration, race, and other issues. An object's view of us. (Produced by the Minneapolis Institute of Art)

The Object The Object podcast from the Minneapolis Institute of Art

    • Arts
    • 4.7 • 81 Ratings

Hosted by Tim Gihring, "The Object" podcast explores the surprising, true stories behind museum objects, touching on immigration, race, and other issues. An object's view of us. (Produced by the Minneapolis Institute of Art)

    Bonus Episode: Take This Job and Fauve It (and Other New Year's Resolutions)

    Bonus Episode: Take This Job and Fauve It (and Other New Year's Resolutions)

    “It’s never too late to have a happy childhood,” wrote Tom Robbins, the novelist. He could have been referring to Henri Rousseau, the fin de siècle autodidact who begins painting seriously in retirement: storybook-style scenes of exotic animals and jungles that eventually catch the eye of Picasso and Matisse. A story worth remembering as you contemplate a new year, same as the old year—or not.

    You can see a print of Rousseau’s “War,” a possible inspiration for Picasso’s “Guernica,” in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/7859/la-guerre-henri-rousseau

    You can see one of Rousseau’s most iconic works, “The Dream,” in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art: https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79277

    A new season of The Object starts soon. Subscribe now and be among the first to hear it.

    • 20 min
    A Christmas Conspiracy: The Family at the End of the World

    A Christmas Conspiracy: The Family at the End of the World

    It’s good to be the pope in the 1600s. But staying pope is not so easy, as the famous Barberini family finds out when one of their own takes up the tiara in 1623. As Rome fills up with their art, and dungeons fill up with their enemies, can they survive the forces of change threatening their worldview—and the forces of the occult threatening to kill the pope on Christmas Day?

    You can see some of the art commissioned by the Barberini family, including Pope Urban VIII, all over Rome—in the Piazza Barberini, the Palazzo Barberini, and of course St. Peter’s Basilica—and also in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art: https://collections.artsmia.org/search/pope%20urban

    Look closely and you may see the curious Barberini family crest—a trio of bees—on fountains, frames, and even the altar in St. Peter’s Basilica. Read about its symbolism and ubiquity here: https://theframeblog.com/2017/08/22/bees-in-the-frame-part-1-the-barberini-bee/

    • 24 min
    The Man Who Would Be Rembrandt

    The Man Who Would Be Rembrandt

    Rembrandt and Lievens were friends and foes, two of the most promising artists of the Dutch Golden Age. But like Mozart and Salieri, one is remembered as an all-time great, the other is mostly forgotten. Only now is the true story of Rembrandt’s rival being told--a story of ego and admiration, tragedy and triumph, forgery and greed. And it’s rewriting everything we know about the master and the nature of genius.

    You can see one of Rembrandt's etchings made after his rival's original here: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/55345/the-second-oriental-head-rembrandt-harmensz-van-rijn

    Here you can see Rembrandt's reworking of his image of Christ presented for judgement, after suffering the wrath of the Church: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/115357/christ-presented-to-the-people-rembrandt-harmensz-van-rijn

    • 23 min
    The Matter of Black Lives

    The Matter of Black Lives

    When Gordon Parks becomes the first Black photographer at LIFE magazine, in 1949, he’s determined to show the full measure of Black lives in America. Whether the magazine, and the rest of America, is ready or not.

    You can see "American Gothic," Parks’ photograph of Ella Watson that is featured in this episode, in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/100557/american-gothic-gordon-parks

    You can see a variety of other work by Parks, who began his career in Minnesota, here: https://collections.artsmia.org/search/artist:%22Gordon%20Parks%22

    • 27 min
    The Photographer in Hitler's Bath

    The Photographer in Hitler's Bath

    When World War II begins, Lee Miller is one of the most sought-after women in the world--a celebrated model, an irresistible muse, and an emerging photographer in her own right. So why does she trade the high life for the front line, risking everything to become the only female photojournalist allowed in combat?

    • 23 min
    The Stolen Horses of Venice

    The Stolen Horses of Venice

    In the early 1800s, the four famous bronze horses of Venice are restored to their place atop St. Mark's Basilica, after a long and humiliating absence. But when American artist Charles Caryl Coleman arrives in Venice, in the 1870s, his celebrated painting of the horses exposes some clues to their real origins. A story of empire and theft, and a betrayal that forever changed the world.

    You can see the painting by Coleman, The Bronze Horses of San Marco, in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/2607/the-bronze-horses-of-san-marco-charles-caryl-coleman

    This episode features a clip from the podcast Curious Objects, from Antiques magazine. Listen to more at https://www.themagazineantiques.com/podcast/

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
81 Ratings

81 Ratings

scheißgeyser ,

I mean … really good

This pod never disappoints. Superbly told stories detailing elements of one of North America’s most interesting (and always free to the public) collections.

Jacq913 ,

Host needs to speak up

Interesting material but the host trails off at the end of each sentence and I miss half of what he says! He needs to speak up.

tla776 ,

Love it!

Interesting, funny, & engaging. Absolutely love it.

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