100 episodes

The QuackCast is a DrunkDuck.com podcast hosted by the site's two administrators, skoolmunkee and ozoneocean. Each week the two hosts espouse on the latest featured comics, cool on-going events, and whatever hot topics of discussion are lighting up the forums. They'll also go off on random tangents about whatever they feel like. A great weekly audio companion to the site itself!

The QuackCast Michael Morris

    • Arts
    • 3.7 • 3 Ratings

The QuackCast is a DrunkDuck.com podcast hosted by the site's two administrators, skoolmunkee and ozoneocean. Each week the two hosts espouse on the latest featured comics, cool on-going events, and whatever hot topics of discussion are lighting up the forums. They'll also go off on random tangents about whatever they feel like. A great weekly audio companion to the site itself!

    QUACKCAST 588, Revisiting Old Ideas, Ozoneocean, Tantz Aerine, Kawaiidaigakusei, Pitface, Banes, Gunwallace, Featured comic, The Werewolf Prince, Featured music, TAoSP, Drunk duck, Webcomics hosting

    QUACKCAST 588, Revisiting Old Ideas, Ozoneocean, Tantz Aerine, Kawaiidaigakusei, Pitface, Banes, Gunwallace, Featured comic, The Werewolf Prince, Featured music, TAoSP, Drunk duck, Webcomics hosting

    Sometimes it's worth revisiting old ideas because you can do them better or explore them deeper. This could be in the form of a full reboot, or it could be as simple as reusing a pose in a panel or using the same theme again like Pixar does with 90% of their output i.e. “coming of age”. Like them you don't need to feel obligated to always do something totally original, revisiting old ideas is a great way to refine them, create better work, or explore different aspects of them you hadn't considered before and put new and interesting spins on things. Consider that Pixar's Turning Red, Encanto, Moana, Coco, The Incredibles 2, Ratatouille, Inside Out, Brave, Onward, and Luca all share the same “coming of age/childhood independence” theme and yet all do it in unique and original ways, exploring different aspects of the idea from all sorts of angles.

    Most of the women that Frank Cho and Milo Manara draw look the same, but they do it in such an interesting way that people love them nevertheless. Leonardo daVinci and or his students painted at least 4 different Mona Lisas and probably many drawings; practice make perfect! How many film and comic versions of the origin story of Batman, Superman, and Spider-man are there? SarahN on Drunk Duck used to restart and redo her comic “Vampire Phantasm” annually, maybe 5 different times, and it just got better and better and more interesting with each iteration. Amelius on DD did a soft reboot of the origin of Charby The Vampirate called “ReVamped” where she went back and tweaked the origin story a little and redrew the pages with much improved art, however she didn't stop working on the original story, that kept going at the same time!

    So you see there is a lot of merit in revisiting things and improving upon them! For every George Lucas inserting bad animation and “Noooooo”s into iconic and much loved films there are many more people who revisit older creations and do much better things with them. What do you wish you could redo with your work or how do you reuse old ideas? For me it's usually specific panels… sometimes they bug me too much and I go back and change them. They could be 15 years old but I'll still do it!

    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to TAoSP The Adventures of Sir Power - In the words of the master behind this tune: funky theme for a comic that's a little bit ‘funky’. It really is a bouncing funk, with a fuzzy, spiky sound that vibrates and cuts its way through.

    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Charby The Vampirate ReVamped - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/ReVamped/
    You can find SarahN's much revisited Vampire Phantasm here - http://www.vermillionworks.com/
    *Wrongly called “Jack” in the cast.

    Featured comic:
    The Werewolf Prince - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/jun/14/featured-comic-the-werewolf-prince/

    Featured music:
    TAoSP - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/TAoSP/ - by Zero Hour, rated M.


    Special thanks to:
    Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
    Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
    Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
    PitFace - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/PIT_FACE/
    Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/
    Kawaiidaigakusei - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/kawaiidaigakusei/

    VIDEO exclusive!
    Become a subscriber on the $5 level and up to see our weekly Patreon video and get our advertising perks!
    - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck
    Even at $1 you get your name with a link on the front page and a mention in the weekend newsposts!

    Join us on Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/7NpJ8GS


     

    • 55 min
    Heroes who are Villains

    Heroes who are Villains

    Our very own Tantz made a newspost last week about the idea of “Heroes” who are really villains… or at least they're actually villains who think they're the hero, but come to realise that they aren't. Sometimes that makes them change their ways and they seek redemption, maybe even becoming a true hero. Sometimes they just lean into and embrace their true villain nature.

    There are many examples in stories: Disney's Gaston from Beauty and the Beast, Lord and Captain Flashheart in the Blackadder series, Zapp Brannigan from Futurama, Stan Smith in American Dad, even Ace Kinkaid in my comic Pinky TA. They're fun characters… It can make for more complex villains, nuanced heroes, or just subversion of audience expectation.

    A real life example came to me when I watched the nastiness of the Russian invasion unfold in Ukraine and realised that they used all the same justifications as our countries did for our invasions and occupations of Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam. We're ALL “the baddies”, no one is immune from self delusion and self righteousness.

    Start Audio - Better Call Saul
    End Audio - The Burbs

    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to Cassie York in the Purple Nowhere - A sophisticated, classy, adult, dancey, jazzy piece mixed with some sharper, harder edged rock. It’s a well made, pretty dress sword with an extra hard edge. Decorative and yet practical.


    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Tantz's newspost about a hero being the villain - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/jun/03/when-the-hero-is-the-villain/

    Featured comic:
    Space Pack - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/jun/07/featured-comic-space-pack/

    Featured music:
    Cassie York in the Purple Nowhere - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Cassie_York_In_the_Purple_Nowhere_Part_I/ - by AidenGrunge, rated E.


    Special thanks to:
    Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
    Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
    Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
    Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/

    VIDEO exclusive!
    Become a subscriber on the $5 level and up to see our weekly Patreon video and get our advertising perks!
    - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck
    Even at $1 you get your name with a link on the front page and a mention in the weekend newsposts!

    Join us on Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/7NpJ8GS

    • 53 min
    Working with disability

    Working with disability

    How do you keep on with your creative output when something happens to you? When you lose function or are impaired in some way, how do you adapt or relearn so you can keep on as you were before? Maybe you can't and have to change to another medium that's a better fit for your abilities? Comic creator Bravo1102 once talked about how he moved from drawing to using action figures to make his comics partially because of his eyesight. My own eyesight has suddenly started to go bad and I'm having to adapt to that, and Tantz tells us how her deteriorating eyesight forced her to work digitally.

    The four of us have had limited experience at dealing directly with impairment, but we've had our moments and all of us know many people who've faced more significant challenges. On numerous occasions I've suffered paralysis to my thumbs lasting many months (alternating sides, not both at the same time), in order to keep on creating I had learn to used the mouse in my other hand (which I still do today), and create a brace made of bands and ties so I could hold my pens and brushes. But that was a minor inconvenience compared to the situation faced by Pitface's mum, Karen Hillard Good, a noted illustrator and artist known for her commercial work and children's books. Last year she experienced a stroke which paralyzed half of her body as well as causing some cognitive impairment. She's had to adapt to her changed physical abilities, relearn how to use her body to create and overcome the challenges facing her.

    As we age and life happens to us there are many things to which we have to learn to adapt, not just physical impairment but mental too. It's just as difficult to adapt to things happening with your mind, like not being able to concentrate, memory issues, depression etc. Are there any physical or mental issues you've had to learn to adapt to so you can continue to create? If so, how did you do it?

    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to The Sophomore - Sparking into action, the reverent tones of a groovy church organ play us into the roiling conflagration of this dancey little tune, full of heat and glaring orange light, this sound warms you through!


    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Artist Karen Hillard Good - https://www.facebook.com/Karen-Hillard-Good-Studio-Art-444025792286012/
    Bravo1102 - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/bravo1102/

    Featured comic:
    The Sophomore - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/may/31/featured-comic-the-sophomore/

    Featured music:
    The Sophomore - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/The_Sophomore/ - by MrPenguin, rated M.


    Special thanks to:
    Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
    Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
    Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
    PitFace - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/PIT_FACE/
    Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/
    Kawaiidaigakusei - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/kawaiidaigakusei/

    VIDEO exclusive!
    Become a subscriber on the $5 level and up to see our weekly Patreon video and get our advertising perks!
    - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck
    Even at $1 you get your name with a link on the front page and a mention in the weekend newsposts!

    Join us on Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/7NpJ8GS

    • 43 min
    Adaptation

    Adaptation

    Adaptations of one thing into another is an interesting process. What's lost, what's gained, what modifications do you have to do to make it happen? As webcomicers we do it all the time in many ways, we have to adapt our influences into ideas, adapt those to stories, and adapt those to images and comics, which isn't trivial! It's often quite difficult to transform the written word into narrative sequential art- what portion of the writing gets directly turned into images, what's cut, and what becomes dialogue? For me about 20% is cut, 78% becomes art and 2% becomes dialogue or captions.

    We chat about film and story adaptations as well of course, War of the Worlds (HG Wells) in particular, since it's become several different movies, artwork, video games, a radio play, and a really excellent prog-rock concept album among other things. All those adaptations take different approaches, Orson Wells' radio play version updated it from the late 19th century Britain to his present day and location and framed it as a developing news story, making clever use of the medium it was playing on. Most cinematic versions have followed Orson's style, but the concept album by Jeff Wayne stuck with the original historical setting which made the story much more interesting, tragic and compelling.

    Another more current and different take on adaptations is the “Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers” movie. This is a live action and CG animated hybrid film version of the 1990s Disney adventure cartoon series which featured a crime fighting rodent team. The usual approach to those adaptations is to simply update the origin story, stating from 0 and set it in the present day using current animation technology to make the characters look as real as possible, the original media is treated as lore and inspiration but is not cannon to toe movie. This movie however took the opposite approach: the original cartoon is treated as a real TV show that the characters (who are shown as actors), stared in, and this movie shows their lives 30 years later. The animation is a mixture of 3d CGI and pseudo 2D cell animation, plus pseudo stop motion claymation and the film is largely used to parody and spoof animated adaptations in general, so it’s perfect for this topic!

    So what are you fave adaptations? Where dp they go wrong or right? And how do you go about the process with your own work?

    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to Amie Armageddon. Hard to describe this one, it sounds like a great pop-song you’d hear on the radio or as the theme song to a big budget movie. Echoing tonal vocals, evocative, layered, sounds… It sets a scene and then expands upon it. Just a really lovely piece of electronica.


    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Featured comic:
    Amie Armageddon - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/may/23/featured-comic-amie-armageddon/

    Featured music:
    Amie Armageddon - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Amie_Armageddon/ - by Machineheadstudio, rated T.


    Special thanks to:
    Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
    Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
    Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
    Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/

    VIDEO exclusive!
    Become a subscriber on the $5 level and up to see our weekly Patreon video and get our advertising perks!
    - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck
    Even at $1 you get your name with a link on the front page and a mention in the weekend newsposts!

    Join us on Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/7NpJ8GS

    • 51 min
    Drawing gender

    Drawing gender

    We start off with the idea of talking about art techniques, tips and tricks we've mastered and could help people with but the cast turned into a discussion about drawing male and female characters- also trans, androgynous, etc. There's an art to representing gender in imagery! It's super important to remember that the way we see gender in art is mainly culture based rather than an innate biological reaction and the perception of gender in art is different according to your cultural background. It's basically a visual language that everyone learns, but as an artist you have to learn to actually “speak” it, and that's not as straight forward as you think.

    A rough example of of how culture based our perception of gender in imagery is:

    - In most Western art the “male” is the default. We take for granted that a figure is male in art unless it's augmented in some way, the most basic version is the stick figure. These are men. To make a female stick figure you add long hair, a dress or boobs. Some or all of that, it doesn't matter. And this scales up to other representations. A natural, more realistic depiction of a female person won't always read as a woman in art unless they are “feminised” in some way, i.e. a prominent bust, removing angles and lines and adding soft, rounded features, featured lips, larger eyes, thin waste, wide hips, long legs, large thighs, styled hair, thin neck, large head. And doing any of that to a male figure is a way to “feminise” them or blend their gender.

    -In comic art from places like Japan and Korea it's the opposite somewhat, especially manga. The female form there is more of the default. Male characters involve a lot more augmentation to create a “masculine” effect, sometimes bordering on caricature, as can happen with female characters in Western art. A generic male manga character would typically read as more “feminine” if dumped straight into a western context.

    In times past the focus was more on primary (g******s), or secondary (beards, boobs etc), sexual characteristics, i.e the Venus of Willendorf (a very female form) and male figures with disproportionately sized penises. While early Egyptian sculpture is pretty androgynous in his regard, male and female are not well differentiated, the main focus is on the build - eg. men having slightly broader chests. Early Greek sculpture even more so with simple abstract forms representing “humans”. Much later on this changed into a more separated, codified style: men being heavy, muscular, bearded, women being soft and slim, with youth of both sexes being more androgynous. Interestingly g******s were very diminished in this art, penises were small and flaccid, while vaginas were never depicted.
    Though it was a different story with the art intended for more secular, “common” consumption, which could show pornographic scenes (mainly 2D). Art featuring Satyrs or Priapus massively exaggerated the g******s for deliberate comedic effect. For them focus on g******s didn't indicate masculinity or femininity so much as comedy, stupidity, shame, or porn.



    Basically gender in art isn't about g******s or genetics, it's all culture based and you need to learn the visual language of your audience to make yourself understood by them, as well as to confuse them or subvert their expectations!
    What trouble have you had when depicting gender? I always run into issues myself. I make my women too angular and my men are too slim.

    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to Gyor - Charged up, magnetically accelerating into clean, sweeping, panoramic electronic tones, momentarily overrun by a furious chaotic electric discharge, only to return to serenity once more.


    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Featured comic:
    Gyor - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/may/17/featured-comic-gyor/

    Featured music:
    Gyor - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Gyor/ - by Tuxie, rated E.


    Special thanks to:
    Gunwallace

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Why is it bad and how to fix it?

    Why is it bad and how to fix it?

    Spoiler- we don't actually talk much about Yu-Gi-Oh! But I feel it's a good example of a pretty bad story- a so-bad-it's-good story, but bad nevertheless. The idea we're talking about here is that it's useful to look at bad stories and stick with them because they can really help you write better. They're a lot more useful than good stories because you'd rather just enjoy those and it's a bit harder to examine them for technical details, but with “bad” stories the faults stand out strongly. Instead of simply dismissing a bad story or making fun of it, it's more useful and valuable to try and “fix” it: try and work out why it seems bad and think about what would be needed to make it better, then think about how that applies to your own work. Maybe you're actually making many of the same mistakes?

    Yu-Gi-Oh! is a little too much work to use as an example, but something like the Marvel movie Eternals is good because it only had a few flaws. Big ones, but also very good parts as well:

    - Lots of telling rather than showing. A text dump at the beginning was just the start of that. It wasn't stylistic choice like in Star Wars, but rather something we need to understand what is happening. All through the film characters tell us about things rather than the story properly depicting them.

    - Revealing the solution to mysteries too early and so it undercuts built up tension. Mysteries are really interesting and intriguing to the audience, even when they think they've solved them, it still feels very rewarding to have them revealed nearer to the end of the story. Revealing them far too early feels like you're being cheated and wastes a valuable resource. Eternals does this twice with very significant mysteries about halfway through.

    - Having generic, cannon-fodder bad guys. This is true of many action stories especially from Marvel films, but it's particularly bad here. Saying any more would be a spoiler. But this is something that Yu-Gi-Oh! does far better.

    - Leaving out information that would better make sense of story elements. We have the character Icarus refereed to frequently as “the Pilot” by another character who's never met him before, but we have no idea why. A deleted scene reveals why, but without that it makes no sense, you're just left to feel it's a pointless joke about the Icarus myth, which it's not.

    - Not solving logic errors. The characters are supposed to be the basis for mythical figures in earth cultures but most are of different ethnicities to the cultures that worship them. This could have been easily solved in two ways: 1. the character “Sprite” could have been shown to have created illusions around them to make them seem like the characters of myth. 2. The character Druig could have been shown to manipulate people's minds to think they were seeing the mythical characters. The story does neither.

    Despite all this and more there are many good points to this story and it would be possible to fix it through re-editing. I found it more rewarding and interesting to work out what exactly made this not such a good film and it helped to better highlight the good parts for me. It also helps me see what to avoid in my own writing and what I'm doing wrong. Try it yourself? Maybe you can tackle Yu-Gi-Oh! and let us know how that could be fixed?
    I'm not brave enough.


    This week Gunwallace has given us a theme to - Malefic Demonic Apocalypse - A creepy red garden filled with writhing demonic monstrosities and horror! This electronic piece grinds and roars, sounding like an acidic, burning harpsichord spewing fury and vitriol in a crimson torrent.


    Topics and shownotes

    Links

    Our movie critique thread does this somewhat - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/forum/topic/177412/?page=36

    Featured comic:
    Oni Streamer Builds a Mech - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/may/10/featured-comic-oni-streamer-builds-a-mech/

    Featured music:
    Malefic Demonic Apocalypse - htt

    • 1 hr 14 min

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

ms.northdakota ,

Hosts are dull as dirt

Why are all comic related podcasts hosted by ppl who have zero charisma whatsoever? Also, I’ve never heard of these ppl’s work- are they actually successful??? Enough to be giving advice on how to make comics?

Top Podcasts In Arts

NPR
The Moth
Roman Mars
Snap Judgment and PRX
Jason Weiser, Carissa Weiser
Rusty Quill