28 episodes

The Response is a podcast series from Shareable.net exploring how to build collective resilience in the wake of disasters

The podcast is part of a broader series from Shareable which includes a documentary film, articles, and a book. Find out more at www.shareable.net/the-response

The Response Shareable

    • Documentary
    • 4.9 • 92 Ratings

The Response is a podcast series from Shareable.net exploring how to build collective resilience in the wake of disasters

The podcast is part of a broader series from Shareable which includes a documentary film, articles, and a book. Find out more at www.shareable.net/the-response

    Documentary #8: Practicing harm reduction in a climate of disasters

    Documentary #8: Practicing harm reduction in a climate of disasters

    "Harm reduction is not just service delivery, it's not just a set of techniques, it's not just a viewpoint of how to engage problematic drug use or sex or whatever have you, it's also part of a social movement that looks for a more just world for drug users, sex workers — that population. So it has a social critique saying, no shit, this is not right." - Rafael Torruella

    This documentary episode of The Response explores how community-based harm reduction programs are responding to climate-fueled disasters and other systems-disrupting emergencies. The 40-min audio documentary features interviews with Rafael Torruella (executive director of Intercambios Puerto Rico), Justin Kunzelman (executive director and co-founder of Rebel Recovery Florida), and Savannah O'Neill (associate director of capacity building at the National Harm Reduction Coalition). 
    Episode credits:
    Host and executive producer: Tom Llewellyn Senior producer and scriptwriter: Robert Raymond Field production and script editing: Tom Llewellyn Additional script editing: Elizabeth Carr and Neal Gorenflo Graphic art created for this episode by Kane Lynch  Theme music: Cultivate Beats A special thank you to everyone who was interviewed for this project

    • 42 min
    Higher Ground Harm Reduction: A conversation with Christine Rodriguez

    Higher Ground Harm Reduction: A conversation with Christine Rodriguez

    Over the course of producing three seasons of The Response podcast, we’ve explored how natural hazards and other disruptions disproportionately impact marginalized communities at length. 
    But one population we haven’t discussed before is people who use drugs. There is still so much stigma associated with using illegal and legal drugs despite the fact that it’s a normal part of life for millions of people worldwide.  
    For the past 9 months, our team at Shareable have been working with Higher Ground Harm Reduction to explore how community-based harm reduction programs (and people who use drugs) are impacted by, preparing for, responding to, and recovering from climate-related and other systems-disrupting emergencies (like the pandemic).
    I recently spoke at length with Christine Rodriguez, the executive director of Higher Ground Harm Reduction. We touch on her personal journey, what harm reduction actually is, how the current climate of disasters has impacted this work, and why we need to have more compassion for one another.
    Next week, we’ll bring you part 2 of this special series with an audio documentary exploring the impact of disasters on harm reduction through the experiences of community service providers in California, Florida, and Puerto Rico.
    The Response is executive produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn, the series producer is Robert Raymond, and our theme music was provided by Cultivate Beats.
    The Response is a project of Shareable, a nonprofit media outlet, action network, and consultancy promoting people-powered solutions for the common good. 
    Our latest book, “Lessons from the First Wave: Resilience in the age of COVID-19”, is available as a free download at shareable.net.
    Support for this project has been provided by the Threshold, Shift, Guerrilla, Clif Bar Family, and Abundant Earth foundations, Shareable’s sponsors including Tipalti, MyTurn, and NearMe, and tax-deductible donations from listeners like you. 
    Additional funding for this research and 2-part series was provided by Resist, The Emergent Fund, Comer Foundation, NASTAD, and AIDS United.
    A full transcript of this episode is available at www.shareable.net/the-response
    If you like the show, please hit subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.
    And send your feedback about the show to theresponse@shareable.net

    • 42 min
    Lessons from the First Wave: Resilience in the Age of COVID-19

    Lessons from the First Wave: Resilience in the Age of COVID-19

    We're pleased to release “Lessons from the First Wave: Resilience in the Age of COVID-19.”

    The free book features 25 case studies, interviews, and how-to guides that showcase some of the most effective community-led responses to this global crisis.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Voices of The Response: The Tubbs fire and UndocuFund (live)

    Voices of The Response: The Tubbs fire and UndocuFund (live)

    “As an undocumented immigrant, you realize that the police, the sheriff, the system — everything — we’re outside of that. But when Undocufund started and we saw so many people helping from all kinds of different places, we realized that although we’re outside the system, we’re not outside the community. And that the community supports us. We know now that at least we are not alone.” -Irma Garcia 
    Irma was just one of many people impacted by the Northern California Tubbs fire on October 8th, 2017. While many of her neighbors were able to seek refuge and support from official relief agencies, undocumented immigrants, like Irma and her family, found themselves needing to fend for themselves. For some it was because they didn’t qualify for financial support, for others, it was the legitimate fear of being reported to ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) or other law enforcement agencies. 
    Three years later, and Northern CA is experiencing the worst fire season on record, and many of the same issues and solutions (like UndocuFund) are bubbling back to the surface.
    Stories of personal experiences, like Irma’s, have the power to build empathy and compassion, educate, and inspire others to take action in their communities.
    With inspiration from Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove’s “Voices of a People’s History of the United States,” we’ve re-imagined the podcast for live theater with what we’re calling: “Voices of The Response.”
    We performed the first live reading of an excerpt from the show in March 2019 at the ReVerberation festival, sharing the stories of two undocumented immigrants (Irma Garcia and “Pastor Al”) and their experiences of the Tubbs Fire.
    Narrated by Tom Llewellyn
    Featuring:

    Gloria E. Rubio-Verduzco as “Irma Garcia” and Kal Shayota as “Pastor Al”
    Story by Robert Raymond and Tom Llewellyn
    Written by Robert Raymond
    Adapted for the Stage by Tom Llewellyn and Rush Cosgrove
    Casting by Rush Cosgrove 
    Edited by Andrew Hasse
    Go deeper:
    Immerse yourself in our audio documentary about the Tubbs Fire and UndocuFund and listen to an extended interview with Mara Ventura (one of the organizers of UndocuFund).

    • 12 min
    Produce for the People: Community resilience and food security

    Produce for the People: Community resilience and food security

    Unhoused populations are struggling to find enough to eat. Farmers are faced with both surplus produce and lower incomes as they are left without places to sell. Individuals have a renewed desire to plant gardens as they grapple with long grocery lines and rising food prices.
    In short, the pandemic is surfacing many of the systemic issues in the global food system that we’ve been mostly ignoring for a long time.
    But what can we do about this at the community, town, or city levels?
    One grassroots organization in the San Francisco Bay Area is attempting to answer that question.
    Today, we’re bringing you the audio from a live roundtable discussion we co-hosted with NorCal Resilience Network last week as part of the launch of “Produce for the People.”
    The new initiative will activate NorCal’s existing coalition of organizations and Resilience Hubs to address critical food security needs in a way that can be replicated on a larger scale in communities all over the world.
    Featured Speakers:
    Keneda Gibson: artist, community organizer with the East Oakland Neighborhood Initiative, and recipient of a Resilience Hub grant to develop a garden rooted in community at her house
    Wanda Stewart: Executive Director of Common Vision and garden educator at Hoover Elementary School
    AshEL Seasunz Eldridge: co-founder of Essential Food and Medicine (EFAM) which reclaims surplus and locally grown produce to make juice, soups, smoothies, and natural medicines that directly serve the most vulnerable people in their communities for free.
    Moderated by Ayano K. Jeffers-Fabro: independent consultant for community food initiatives (most recently acting as project manager for incubating a community-led grocery cooperative in East Oakland).
    Our panelists dove into many difficult topics and questions including:
    The history of racial inequities within the food industry and how this intersection between food justice and racial justice could evolve moving forward How communities have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic What an equitable hyper-local food web could look like in the future (based on the building blocks that currently exist), including resilience hubs as centers for food growing and distribution And how to “squash the beef” by physically working through conflict together while digging into common ground.   A full transcript of this episode is available at www.shareable.net/the-response
    If you like the show, please hit subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.
    And send your feedback about the show to theresponse@shareable.net

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Crowdsourcing data to fight the pandemic in Rio’s favelas

    Crowdsourcing data to fight the pandemic in Rio’s favelas

    This week, on The Response podcast we spoke with Theresa Willamson, the founder/director of Catalytic Communities about many of the favela-led responses to the pandemic in Rio de Janeiro — things like food distribution, communication techniques, and the crowdsourcing of data to support independent tracking dashboard. We also discussed Rio’s legacy of being the world’s largest slave port is continuing to exacerbate the ongoing social disaster the favelas were facing before the pandemic.

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
92 Ratings

92 Ratings

123abc...Back to Basics ,

Humanity at its best!

Inspiring and comforting knowing people can and do help each other, and people can and do restore the hope for those who forgot what hope is!

Sluzerp! ,

"Paradise Built in Hell": what that looks like

Shareable's Response podcast is a great window into the real community-building going on everywhere, usually just out of sight. Here's the path forward!

rebeccafriedman ,

Brilliant series!

Tom is a compelling storyteller who brings a wealth of information together. His ideas and experiences are cutting edge and yet common sense. He is courageous and a real leader. I’ve learned a great deal from him and am grateful he’s putting these stories into the public realm to inspire a wider audience. Recommended

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