16 episodes

Trust in journalists is at an all-time low, but the work of journalism matters more than ever. And traditional “objectivity” may be hurting, rather than helping. All journalists have a view from somewhere, and ”objective” journalism often upholds status quo thinking and reinforces racism, sexism, and transphobia. Host Lewis Raven Wallace was fired from the public radio show Marketplace in 2017 for saying just that. In the years since, Lewis has dug into the history of “objectivity,” who it serves, and who it excludes. The View from Somewhere tells the stories of journalists who have resisted “objectivity” and stood up for justice, and envisions new approaches to truth and integrity in journalism.

The View from Somewhere Critical Frequency

    • History
    • 4.9, 101 Ratings

Trust in journalists is at an all-time low, but the work of journalism matters more than ever. And traditional “objectivity” may be hurting, rather than helping. All journalists have a view from somewhere, and ”objective” journalism often upholds status quo thinking and reinforces racism, sexism, and transphobia. Host Lewis Raven Wallace was fired from the public radio show Marketplace in 2017 for saying just that. In the years since, Lewis has dug into the history of “objectivity,” who it serves, and who it excludes. The View from Somewhere tells the stories of journalists who have resisted “objectivity” and stood up for justice, and envisions new approaches to truth and integrity in journalism.

    The End of Extractive Journalism

    The End of Extractive Journalism

    Extractive journalism—reporting on communities without input or accountability—is the model for a lot of journalism in the U.S., especially journalism about low-income people and communities of color. But lots of people are and have been actively resisting this model. We hear from Sarah Alvarez of Outlier Media in Detroit and Bettina Chang of City Bureau in Chicago about building journalism organizations based on power-sharing rather than extraction, how information can save lives in pandemic times, and how the COVID-19 crisis has changed their work.

    • 39 min
    Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

    Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

    Journalist and professor Steven Thrasher draws out the connections between coverage of HIV/AIDS and coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Thrasher joined us for Episode 8 about queer media history and AIDS. Also: How handwashing is a symbol for trust and the ability to be changed by new information. 

    • 27 min
    Standing in the Rising Water

    Standing in the Rising Water

    Host Lewis Raven Wallace talks about the need to seize a sense of possibility and imagination during the coronavirus pandemic, reads from The View from Somewhere book about reporting on the end of the world (standing in the rising water), and previews special programming coming soon.

    • 14 min
    The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

    The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

    Is it racist? Are they lying? Some journalists are afraid to weigh in on facts even when they have good evidence. Why? Turns out there’s a whole history behind accusations of “liberal media bias” and the twisting of truth by Right Wing pundits. With expert commentary from historian Nicole Hemmer, journalism critic Jay Rosen, and poet and author Kevin Young, this episode explores the history of right wing media, “liberal media bias,” and how we can become truth swimmers, seeking multiple truths without giving up on truth altogether. It features the story of filmmaker Marlon Riggs and a brief dive into the origins of “Birtherism,” the conspiratorial accusation that President Barack Obama was born outside the United States. James Baldwin once wrote, “expose the question the answer hides.” He’s our guide for this episode. 

    • 37 min
    Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

    Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

    Former public radio reporter Brenda Salinas and former public television producer Cecilia Garcia reflect on how far public media hasn’t come on “diversity” in the last forty years—and why. Also: how producers of color can protect their magic. Lewis and Ramona share their experiences in public media, and suggest a different framework for thinking about “diversity.” Salinas, an NPR Kroc Fellow and a producer at KUT Austin, describes how she was pushed out of public media by racism and sexism; Garcia, creator of the bilingual Latino newsmagazine Para mi Pueblo, sat on a task force in 1977 calling for the kind of diversity public media still struggles with. 

    • 37 min
    Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

    Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

    Queer media has always been based in a personal experience, and being close to the story role served a particular purpose in a time of crisis. Sarah Schulman, Steven Thrasher, and John Scagliotti reflect on the history of queer media, from Scagliotti’s scrappy start in the 1970s, to Schulman’s groundbreaking reporting in the 1980s, to the work of the LGBTQ press to expose the truth about the AIDS crisis. 

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
101 Ratings

101 Ratings

podcastrrrr ,

Every journalist should listen

I work in podcasts and for a national news organization. I’ve been closely following recent news about conflicts in public media newsrooms and have always been passionate about the debates that go on ~inside newsrooms, bc I care about our role and also bc of my own identity. I dreamed of a podcast like this and was so thrilled to discover it on Twitter in June. Thanks Lewis and Ramona!

Hel-raiser ,

Illuminating and inspiring

Lewis and Ramona examine incredibly timely phenomena in journalism and interview people with innovative solutions. So important right now! (I also love Ramona’s Dreamboy references!)

jspeyton ,

Very Intriguing!

Just listened to the first episode and I am thoroughly excited by this premise. I enjoy thoughtfully critical approaches to journalism, and this seems exactly that. Keep up the great work!

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