25 episodes

Boston area comedians Julia Rios and Geoffrey Pelton discuss the movies we watched as children that shaped who we are today, for better ... or for worse

thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com

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    • Comedy

Boston area comedians Julia Rios and Geoffrey Pelton discuss the movies we watched as children that shaped who we are today, for better ... or for worse

thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com

    After These Messages: Santa's Comin' To Advertise

    After These Messages: Santa's Comin' To Advertise

    Fouhy, Geoffrey’s improv group friend comes back to talk about commercials related to a the Rankin and Bass stop motion Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town! You can catch Fouhy in Improvised History at the Democracy Center in Harvard Square, or in Junebug, a Firefly-inspired improv show (which our own Geoffrey is in, too). The next Junebug appearance is February 23rd, 2020 at Improv Boston.

    We kicked off this session by watching a bit of Bruce Springsteen’s live performance of Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.

    What a hat, huh?

    Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town with commercials from 1981

    We watched through all the commercials up until about 27:35 in this video, and that left us really curious about the sitcoms advertised, so we watched the opening themes.

    Open All Night #1

    We just watched the theme song… but wow that was a lot of info. Here’s a breakdown of the facts:

    *This is the Story of Gordon Feester*Born in Ohio the day before Easter*Graduated from Columbus High in 1962*Went to college, but got suspended*Was in the Army (stationed at Fort Hood)*Never went overseas (Spent a year peeling potatoes and a year copping zees)*After that he drifted and at times he seemed to struggle but always paid the rent *By 1974 he owned a grocery store*Married a woman named Gretchen who hangs around the house*Gretchen has a son named Terry by a previous spouse

    Now he’s open all night, which we repeat rather ominously like… eight? times???

    This was A LOT.

    It’s a Living S02E01

    Again we only watched the theme, and again… wow.

    Leprechaun’s Christmas Gold: Christmas in Killarney

    Fouhy notes that the young man is the same model as Jack Frost from another Rankin Bass special.

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 18 min
    Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town with Fouhy

    Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town with Fouhy

    One of Geoffrey’s improv group members joins us to talk about a Christmas special he loved as a kid: The Rankin and Bass stop motion Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town! You can catch Fouhy in Improvised History at the Democracy Center in Harvard Square, or in Junebug, a Firefly-inspired improv show (which our own Geoffrey is in, too). The next Junebug appearance is February 23rd, 2020 at Improv Boston.

    Image Description: Kris Kringle as a young red-haired man with a menacing grimace.

    Here’s Fouhy’s hazy summary:

    “It's about the origin story of Santa. I think he's an orphan adopted by elves and has an amazing facility with making wooden toys. Wooden toys are Important in this film. There's something in here about mysterious parentage and him being found with some item that has SC branded on it? For reasons I don't remember he goes out into the world on his own. I think it has to do with finding a wife? I know at some point he meets Mrs. Claus and that's a whole thing. He finds some ancient, evil ice warlock and convinces him to become good with the power of wooden toys. Then he finds his first humans, who are in a town run by a miserly burgomeister (the Rankin-Bass films can have some weird anti-European sentiment in them). I think this is where the future Mrs. Claus comes in? Anyway, he also convinces the burgomeister to become a better man through, again, the power of wooden toys. Then I think he found his workshop in the North Pole and the rest is history.”

    Was he right? Mostly!

    This is the second thing we’ve watched where a hapless penguin ends up in the wrong part of the world (the first was The Chipmunk Adventure). Is this part of a larger trend? #PenguinWatch

    This movie’s narrator was Fred Astaire (!!!), and one of the other voice actors in this was Paul Frees, the Ghost Host in Disney’s Haunted Mansion ride. Geoffrey also noted that Paul Frees was in Flight of Dragons, and pledged that we will cover that at some point. Are you a Flight of Dragons fan? Let us know!

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Murder She Wrote and The Incredible Mr. Limpet with Matt

    Murder She Wrote and The Incredible Mr. Limpet with Matt

    Matt from Spectology joins us again to talk about stuff tangentially related to Bedknobs and Broomsticks. Buckle up, because we start out with a pretty tenuous connection, and then things get weirder…

    We started by watching the Murder She Wrote video by Chaka Demus and Pliers because Angela Lansbury was in a show by the same name so uh… we decided this was on theme.

    Many butts in this, though, unlike in Bedknobs and Broomsticks, they aren’t getting kicked by suits of armor.

    Next we watched the commercial for the Murder She Wrote TV movie South By Southwest.

    And a commercial for Murder She Wrote on USA.

    312 murders a year, because one good murder deserves another.

    And then Geoffrey showed everyone Positive Moves, a video that seems to be made to encourage older women to take care of their bodies and be sex positive, starring Angela Lansbury.

    And finally, we watched a clip of the movie Julia was mashing Bedknobs and Broomsticks up with. Here’s The Incredible Mr Limpet’s “I wish I were a fish”clip.

    We don’t want to wait another million years to send you MOAR show notes, so if you aren’t already signed up for our newsletter, consider doing that now!

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 26 min
    Bedknobs and Broomsticks with Matt

    Bedknobs and Broomsticks with Matt

    Matt from the Spectology podcast joins us to talk about one of his childhood faves, Bedknobs and Broomsticks. This is another one you can catch on Disney+ if you want to play the home game!

    We talk witchcraft, imperialism, rigid enforcement of gender roles, and also a bunch of fun stuff.

    Matt watched this one a bunch when he was a kid, but somehow forgot that it had animated bits???

    Here’s his hazy summary:

    “It is England during World War 2 and some children from the city are sent to live with a cool old witch who lives in the middle of nowhere in the countryside. They don't believe in either her, or magic (or the Nazis? or they're the only ones who do believe in the Nazis?), or any of the above, and she doesn't believe in children. Good thing the Nazis are...invading this tiny town via submarine? So it's up to the witch to use magic to animate a bunch of furniture which then becomes an army the children lead against the Nazis and they win and World War 2 is saved!”

    Julia, meanwhile, remembered that this was live action and animated, but mashed it up with a movie starring Don Knotts called The Incredible Mr. Limpet. Clearly we’re going to have to take that one on at some point…

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 14 min
    After These Messages: Care Bears

    After These Messages: Care Bears

    Geoffrey and Julia watch some commercials related to the Care Bears.

    Care Bears Care-a-lot playset with rainbow rollers.

    1984 Care Bears Share Bear and Champ Bear

    Geoffrey regales us with the history of Share Bear, and we also learn a bit about how apparently Luck Bear didn’t bother to show up for Geoffrey when he should have to give Geoffrey some good dating luck in college.

    We also talk some about Typhoid Mary. If you have vaguely heard that name but don’t know the history, it’s pretty wild!

    1983 Care-a-Lot Playset

    No bears included, which is pretty sad. This led to a run of playlet reminiscence and a couple more playlet commercials.

    1981 Castle Grayskull

    We agree this is the coolest, and Geoffrey actually had it!

    1985 My Little Pony Dream Castle

    Julia had this one, which did actually come with a pony.

    Care bears 2014

    Geoffrey thought this was very 80s. Julia felt it was more 2010s feeling than any actual 80s commercials, but we’re clearly in the waves of 80s and 90s nostalgia time…

    The Story of Rainbow Heart Bear

    This answers a bunch of our Care Bears reproduction/creation questions. And it also led us to talk a bit about toxoplasmosis and other parasites.

    We also compare the bio horror of Rainbow Heart Bear to the Soulless Abyss Eyes of the new Teddy Ruxpin. If you don’t know what that’s all about, we recommend revisiting the After These Messages we did with Christa Carmen about Teddy Ruxpin and Puppy Surprise.

    We also wished there was a fanvid of “Cold Hearted” by Paula Abdul with clips of Professor Coldheart in it. If you know of something like this, or if you’ve made one yourself, let us know!

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 26 min
    The Care Bears Battle the Freeze Machine

    The Care Bears Battle the Freeze Machine

    We’re starting off 2020 with a classic that Julia had on VHS: The Care Bears Battle the Freeze Machine. This was a 1984 TV special, that also became one of the best selling children’s videos of its year for some reason.

    Image description: a bunch of Care Bears standing in a row perform the Care Bear Stare, which is to say they shoot colored beams out of their tummies.

    Here’s Julia’s hazy summary:

    “There's a boy named Derek who has no friends and decides to be mean to people because he is lonely. Professor Coldheart gives him a freeze machine, which is like a telescope that literally ices people, so he's basically like proto-incel evil Elsa from Frozen, but with no magic powers so he has to lean on evil technology? He freezes kids when he sees them having fun, like playing baseball or whatever. Eventually the care bears (and I think also maybe the care bear cousins) emit rainbow care bear feeeeelings at him and he decides he should be nice and unfreeze everyone, and they all are friends after that, I guess?” 

    WOW was Julia wrong! Starting with the fact that there is no one named Derek in this, and continuing on from there.

    We take an exploratory journey into the Care Bears mythos, wonder about who the Self Care Bears would be (Self- advocacy Bear, Healthy Boundaries Bear, Recognizing Toxic Relationships Bear, Treat Yourself Bear, Consent Bear…). What other Self Care Bears do you think there might be?

    We also discuss the underrated and unsung hero of this, Frostbite. #JusticeForFrostbite!

    Now, a thing to note here is that we both found this video on the internet and it was a copy of the contents on the same VHS Julia had as a kid. The actual cartoon is only half of the full video length. Geoffrey stopped there, but Julia watched through the second half, in which someone reads two Care Bears books and the screen shows static pictures of the illustrations. We talk about those a bit, too, so if you are trying to play the home game and you’re a completist, you gotta find a video that is closer to an hour than half an hour.

    We also have some important questions. Like, is Birthday Bear a valuable contributor to the Care Bear community, or unnecessary? And who would win in a fight, the Care Bears, or the goblins from Troll 2?

    If you’re having fun listening to us, please tell your friends about us! Subscribe to our newsletter at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com for free, or pay $5/month to get access to two bonus paid episodes each month! We’re also on Patreon if that’s your jam! Rate and review us! follow us on Twitter where we’re @thisiswhy_pod! And, of course, you can always drop us a note at at thisiswhywerelikethis@gmail.com.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at thisiswhywerelikethis.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

Tomdmeyer ,

A hilarious revisit of 80s and 90s culture

Julia and Geoffrey strike the perfect balance between silliness, analysis, and heart in this new podcast.

QuincyGal ,

Yay! Didn’t know I needed this podcast!

I’ve been enjoying giggling along. Thanks guys!

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