78 episodes

Todd Nief's Show is about unpacking the models that people use to think about the world and solve problems in complex areas like fitness, business, nutrition, music, and academia.

Todd Nief's Show Todd Nief

    • Health & Fitness

Todd Nief's Show is about unpacking the models that people use to think about the world and solve problems in complex areas like fitness, business, nutrition, music, and academia.

    Brian Speronello (Accelerated Conversions)

    Brian Speronello (Accelerated Conversions)

    Brian Speronello is a copywriter who runs a boutique copywriting shop called Accelerated Conversions. He works closely with a handful of clients - including The Ready State (formerly MobilityWOD). Brian was recently involved in the rebranding of MobilityWOD to The Ready State, so he shares some of the copywriting lessons that he’s learned over the years of writing high-converting sales pages - as well as how he applied those lessons to a tangible project like working with the Kelly and Juliet Starrett on changing the name of their company. Check out the full interview with Brian to learn how to write persuasively.
    If you're enjoying the show, the best way to support it is by sharing with your friends. If you don't have any friends, why not a leave a review? It makes a difference in terms of other people finding the show.
    You can also subscribe to receive my e-mail newsletter at www.toddnief.com. Most of my writing never makes it to the blog, so get on that list.
    Check out more from Brian and Accelerated Conversions here: Website: www.acceleratedconversions.com Show Notes: [01:22] Why Brian chooses to only work with a select group of clients – and why turning your craft into a “business” can pull you away from doing the work that you love [15:03] Why would someone pay thousands of dollars per month to put words on a website? [19:47] How Brian gets people’s attention – without compromising his ethics or resorting to clickbait [24:02] How does Brian figure out what people actually want and will pay for – as opposed to just what they say they want [30:23] Dissecting one of the most famous examples in copywriting (Schlitz Beer) – and understanding how to prove claims in your copy so your clients find them believable [48:03] The value of constant feedback from clients – and how Brian uses feedback to better understand his market [55:46] The ultimate test to find out if your sales pitch is ethical [57:10] The rebranding and relaunch of The Ready State – and how Brian applied the principles from this conversation to this real life example [01:09:30] The power of a guarantee to further build trust and credibility [01:14:10] How to connect with Brian Links and Resources Mentioned “What is difference between maxima (or minima) and global maxima (or minima)?” from Mathematics Stack Exchange Jay Abraham “Jay Abraham, Claude Hopkins, Schlitz Beer And Preeminence” from Copywriting Secrets “How to Write a Good Advertisement” by Victor O. Schwab “Made to Stick” by Chip and Dan Heath “Entrepreneurs, Credibility and The Sinatra Test” by JP Solano “Three Ways To Grow A Business” from Jay Abraham The Ready State Kelly Starrett Juliet Starrett Free Trial – The Ready State | Example of Headline Copywriting Organifi

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Jessica Danger (Morning Chalk Up | A Fresh Cup of Fitness)

    Jessica Danger (Morning Chalk Up | A Fresh Cup of Fitness)

    Jessica Danger is a creative writing professor, an editor at the Morning Chalk Up, and a co-host of the "A Fresh Cup of Fitness" podcast. I’ve been writing #content for well over a decade now - starting with a polemical high school zine - and I haven’t put too much thought into my writing other than just vomiting ideas out. I was eager to get the perspective of an actual writer, editor and professor on how to improve writing, and I found many of her tips to be both super insightful and actionable. We also discuss balancing the incentives of clicks and engagement with maintaining an editorial standard when curating content for the Morning Chalk Up, as well as Jessica’s own creative projects like her new podcast "A Fresh Cup of Fitness" and her renewed focus on publishing her memoir.
    Check out more from Jessica, the Morning Chalk Up & A Fresh Cup of Fitness here: Website: www.jlynndanger.com | Morning Chalk Up Podcast: A Fresh Cup of Fitness Instagram: @mamadanger | @morningchalkup If you're enjoying the show, the best way to support it is by sharing with your friends. If you don't have any friends, why not a leave a review? It makes a difference in terms of other people finding the show.
    You can also subscribe to receive my e-mail newsletter at www.toddnief.com. Most of my writing never makes it to the blog, so get on that list.
    Show Notes: [01:15] Writing is a skill that is learned through constant practice and iteration - just like skills in fitness. It's less magical than people think. [07:05] There's one consistent stumbling block that shows up for beginning, intermediate and advanced writers - it just presents itself differently. [14:52] Does reading actually translate into making people better writers? Or is there some other mysterious skill that makes people good at writing? What other drills can people use to improve their writing? [26:15] Most people make this mistake when trying to write and edit their work. And - what are other drills that people can use to become better editors? [35:00] What is worth sharing with the large audience of the Morning Chalk Up? What different types of people read the newsletter, and how does Jessica develop an intuition for what they are interested in? [42:00] No click bait and no "iceberg lettuce" in the Morning Chalk Up [49:40] What should a potential contributor think about when pitching an editor? And what drives editors crazy about bad pitches? [59:13] "A Fresh Cup of Fitness" podcast - and the difference between written content and a more conversational podcast [01:11:11] Jessica's memoir - and her plans to prioritize getting published after focusing on different aspects of her career Links and Resources Mentioned Romantic poetry "S****y First Drafts" by Anne Lamott Fan fiction John Updike John Irving Raymond Chandler Ogden Nash "The Fourth State of Matter" by Jo Ann Beard Brittany Marsh Pocket Leo Tolstoy "Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson "Neuromancer" by William Gibson "The Call of the Wild" by Jack London

    • 1 hr 17 min
    What I've Learned About Learning

    What I've Learned About Learning

    I’ve put a lot of thought into learning over the last year or two - both in terms of learning things myself (like coding, improvisation on guitar, and assorted wide reading into too many different interests) and in terms of teaching coaches who I work with. Learning is a super power, since acquiring new skills allows you to quickly level up. In the case of an organization, if you can learn effectively and then teach effectively, you can compound your gains in skills. I don’t feel great about my understanding of the "transfer problem" (the ability to apply learning from one scenario into another), and I’d love to learn more about how to overcome this barrier. Anyway, check out what I’ve learned about learning and level up!
    If you're enjoying the show, the best way to support it is by sharing with your friends. If you don't have any friends, why not a leave a review? It makes a difference in terms of other people finding the show.
    You can also subscribe to receive my e-mail newsletter at www.toddnief.com. Most of my writing never makes it to the blog, so get on that list.
    Show Notes: [00:09] Learning and teaching are superpowers. Not only can you level up your own skills - if you can pass that information on, you can level up everyone in the organization. [03:33] Understanding one thing has dramatically improved my ability to teach and pass along skills: People need to be solving a problem in order to learn effectively [10:41] What is the optimal blend of theory and practice? Some people end up doing a bunch of "drills" and "skill transfer" exercises that result in little real progress. Others spend a lot of time on "book learnin" that doesn't have practical application. How do the best blend the two? [17:40] Transfer from practice scenarios into real life application is extremely difficult. How can we create practice scenarios that recreate the chaos and unpredictability of real life? [24:44] Pattern matching and "chunking" facilitates creativity and understanding of nuance - and also creates the illusion of "genius" or "talent." [30:55] Better improving the transfer problem is probably the highest leverage activity we can focus on in learning and teaching Links and Resources Mentioned Scott H Young Ultralearning: Master Hard Skills, Outsmart the Competition, and Accelerate Your Career by Scott Young Scott Young (Author of Ultralearning) Interview on Todd Nief’s Show Socratic Questioning on Todd Nief’s Show Transfer of learning Cristiano Ronaldo - Tested To The Limit! - YouTube Shopify Magnus Carlsen Magnus Carlsen: ‘You need to be very fortunate to be No 1 in fantasy football’ Leo Messi 33 Alien Goals by Lionel Messi 👽 - YouTube

    • 32 min
    [From Coach to Business] Will Hoekenga (Copygrad)

    [From Coach to Business] Will Hoekenga (Copygrad)

    This is a cross-post from the From Coach to Business podcast. My friend Brandon and I both often get questions about starting and growing a coaching business - either online or in the brick and mortar space - so we put together a season with answers to some of the most common questions we get as well as some insight on the mistakes that we made while we were starting out.
    This episode is with Will Hoekenga from Copygrad. A few years ago, Will was pumping out some great content on copywriting on his blog that I found super valuable. Since then, he's gone on to work with some bigwigs selling some pretty impressive products.
    I found this to be the most personally helpful episode of the From Coach to Business podcast. Even if you don't think of yourself as "a copywriter," developing the basic skills of writing persuasively and understanding how to communicate to people makes just about everything in life easier. Highly recommended!
    If you're in the fitness industry and you want to check out the full season, head over to www.fromcoachtobusiness.com/season-1 or search "From Coach to Business" in your podcast player of choice.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Gretchen Leslie (GrowthLab)

    Gretchen Leslie (GrowthLab)

    Gretchen Leslie is the Director of Operations for GrowthLab and I Will Teach You To Be Rich. I recently attended a live event that Gretchen and the GrowthLab team put on in New York, and I wanted to talk with Gretchen about her management philosophy and how she manages an entirely remote team. Gretchen has an extensive background in Six Sigma and large organizations, so - between that and her work with GrowthLab - she has deep insights from a wide variety of organizational scenarios. Anyone who works with people will get some excellent takeaways from this episode, particularly if you have to hold people accountable, coordinate the work of multiple folks into a cohesive vision, and create a culture where employees are bought in and actively trying to make things better.
    Check out more from Gretchen, GrowthLab and I Will Teach You To Be Rich: Website: GrowthLab | I Will Teach You To Be Rich If you're enjoying the show, the best way to support it is by sharing with your friends. If you don't have any friends, why not a leave a review? It makes a difference in terms of other people finding the show.
    You can also subscribe to receive my e-mail newsletter at www.toddnief.com. Most of my writing never makes it to the blog, so get on that list.
    Show Notes: [01:07] “The Venice of the South” – where you can take your boat to the casino and pick up a daquiri on the way [06:46] Tips and tricks for running operations on a distributed team – and what to look for in order to hire people who are a good fit for remote work [14:09] Gretchen’s key management framework: “What does done look like?” And why just having a hyper-detailed spec sheet doesn’t mean that everyone is aligned on a project. [21:15] A real life example of successful project management coordination across teams: The “Founding Class” event that GrowthLab recently put on in New York. [27:29] How to find the balance between bottoms-up idea generation and top-down decision-making in an organization. And, how to effectively challenge employees so that they are able to vet their own ideas. [35:20] The two types of mistakes that organizations make when tracking data. And, how Gretchen uses psychology to create compliance to process. [45:50] How to make meetings not suck – and why GrowthLab has a “No Meeting Wednesday” policy. [53:45] Music, subcultures, and the trajectory of “excitement” to “jadedness” within a subculture. Links and Resources Mentioned Kanban board “The Beginners’ Guide to Agile Project Management Methodology” from Workfront PMP Certification Six Sigma Jira Asana Jimmy Buffett Stephanie Lee Coachella Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival Rhythm & Roots Festival Old Crow Medicine Show Gene Simmons Kiss Debbie Harry “Face It” by Debbie Harry New York Dolls The Stooges Beat Generation CrossFit Dungeons & Dragons Magic: The Gathering Stranger Things Furby “Inside the Bizarre World of ‘Bronies,’ Adult Male Fans of ‘My Little Pony’” from The Daily Beast Ramit Sethi Straight edge

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Evan Peikon (Training Think Tank)

    Evan Peikon (Training Think Tank)

    Anyone who has coached or competed in CrossFit for awhile sees things that kind of don’t make sense. Athletes with 15+ unbroken ring muscle-ups and a 6:30 2k row who are surprisingly bad at “metcons.” Athletes who can only do 5-10 unbroken strict handstand push-ups who are able to quickly chip away at a set of 50 and beat athletes who can do 20+ unbroken reps. Evan Peikon from Training Think Tank has done a lot of work with the Moxy unit on measuring muscle oxygen saturation and blood flow, and he’s developed a model that is able to explain a lot of these seemingly confusing contradictions in performance. While this conversation gets a bit into the weeds, a lot of these details are necessary to understand the complexity of fatigue in CrossFit as a sport. If you’ve ever seen something that doesn’t make any sense in CrossFit, Evan’s framework may give some insight into what’s actually going on with different “types” of athletes.
    Check out more from Evan and Training Think Tank here:
    Instagram: @evan_peikon | @trainingthinktank Website: Evan’s Interviews and Articles | www.trainingthinktank.com YouTube: @trainingthinktank If you're enjoying the show, the best way to support it is by sharing with your friends. If you don't have any friends, why not a leave a review? It makes a difference in terms of other people finding the show.
    You can also subscribe to receive my e-mail newsletter at www.toddnief.com. Most of my writing never makes it to the blog, so get on that list.
    Show Notes:
    [01:10] Evan’s opinions on metalcore [10:55] The basic physiology of oxygen delivery and what different measures like VO2 max, muscle oxygen saturation and heart rate can tell us about performance [16:58] What are different types of fatigue that can occur at the muscle level? And – the 3 different types of limiters in CrossFit athletes. [23:35] What is the difference between Evan’s model of fatigue based upon his work with muscle oxygen saturation and more traditional models of fatigue based upon acidosis? [31:45] What is happening when athletes feel “burning” in the muscle vs when athletes feel a “pump” in the muscle? How do these sensations in the muscle create global feelings of fatigue? What role does the “mind” play in governing our effort? [41:44] Psychological gamesmanship in racing – particularly in track athletes [45:00] What role do occlusions play in creating fatigue for athletes in CrossFit? And – the 2 different types of occlusion and what those mean for your ability to “push through.” [01:03:40] Why do some people always have one specific muscle group “blow up” – like their grip, their shoulders, their low back, their calves, etc. [01:09:23] How can athletes who tend to get muscle pumps improve their ability in CrossFit? What would an ideal training session look like for this athlete – and why do some common training protocols potentially make this kind of athlete worse? [01:17:25] What does Evan think the most common limiting factor is for athletes who do not tend to occlude in their muscles? These athletes often struggle to build strength – how should they structure their strength training protocols so they can actually get stronger? Links and Resources Mentioned
    Norma Jean Josh Scogin Cory Brandan Norma Jean – Redeemer The Chariot CTP Underoath Slipknot Pound Classes What is muscle oxygen saturation? NIRS(Near-infrared spectroscopy) Moxy Monitor VO2 max The Phosphocreatine System Anaerobic glycolysis Cellular respiration Energy system utilization chart Bicarbonate buffer system 5-1-5 Step Test Improvements in Cycling Time Trial Performance Are Not Sustained Following the Acute Provision of Challenging and Deceptive Feedback Max El Hag Travis Mayer James Jowsey

    • 1 hr 27 min

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Todd Nief is a modern day Adonis and I would happily jam his music, podcast, and birth his children.

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