58 episodes

Trusted CI is the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. The mission of Trusted CI is to lead in the development of an NSF Cybersecurity Ecosystem with the workforce, knowledge, processes, and cyberinfrastructure that enables trustworthy science and NSF’s vision of a nation that is a global leader in research and innovation. More information can be found at trustedci.org.

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Trusted CI is the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. The mission of Trusted CI is to lead in the development of an NSF Cybersecurity Ecosystem with the workforce, knowledge, processes, and cyberinfrastructure that enables trustworthy science and NSF’s vision of a nation that is a global leader in research and innovation. More information can be found at trustedci.org.

    May 2021: Identifying Vulnerable GitHub Repositories in Scientific Cyberinfrastructure: An Artificial Intelligence Approach

    May 2021: Identifying Vulnerable GitHub Repositories in Scientific Cyberinfrastructure: An Artificial Intelligence Approach

    The scientific cyberinfrastructure community heavily relies on public internet-based systems (e.g., GitHub) to share resources and collaborate. GitHub is one of the most powerful and popular systems for open source collaboration that allows users to share and work on projects in a public space for accelerated development and deployment. Monitoring GitHub for exposed vulnerabilities can save financial cost and prevent misuse and attacks of cyberinfrastructure. Vulnerability scanners that can interface with GitHub directly can be leveraged to conduct such monitoring. This research aims to proactively identify vulnerable communities within scientific cyberinfrastructure. We use social network analysis to construct graphs representing the relationships amongst users and repositories. We leverage prevailing unsupervised graph embedding algorithms to generate graph embeddings that capture the network attributes and nodal features of our repository and user graphs. This enables the clustering of public cyberinfrastructure repositories and users that have similar network attributes and vulnerabilities. Results of this research find that major scientific cyberinfrastructures have vulnerabilities pertaining to secret leakage and insecure coding practices for high-impact genomics research. These results can help organizations address their vulnerable repositories and users in a targeted manner.

    Speaker Bio: Dr. Sagar Samtani is an Assistant Professor and Grant Thornton Scholar in the Department of Operations and Decision Technologies at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University (2020 – Present). He is also a Fellow within the Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research (CACR) at IU. Samtani graduated with his Ph.D. in May 2018 from the Artificial Intelligence Lab in University of Arizona’s Management Information Systems (MIS) department from the University of Arizona (UArizona). He also earned his MS in MIS and BSBA in 2014 and 2013, respectively, from UArizona. From 2014 – 2017, Samtani served as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarship-for-Service (SFS) Fellow.

    Samtani’s research centers around Explainable Artificial Intelligence (XAI) for Cybersecurity and cyber threat intelligence (CTI). Selected recent topics include deep learning, network science, and text mining approaches for smart vulnerability assessment, scientific cyberinfrastructure security, and Dark Web analytics. Samtani has published over two dozen journal and conference papers on these topics in leading venues such as MIS Quarterly, JMIS, ACM TOPS, IEEE IS, Computers and Security, IEEE Security and Privacy, and others. His research has received nearly $1.8M (in PI and Co-PI roles) from the NSF CICI, CRII, and SaTC-EDU programs.

    He also serves as a Program Committee member or Program Chair of leading AI for cybersecurity and CTI conferences and workshops, including IEEE S&P Deep Learning Workshop, USENIX ScAINet, ACM CCS AISec, IEEE ISI, IEEE ICDM, and others. He has also served as a Guest Editor on topics pertaining to AI for Cybersecurity at IEEE TDSC and other leading journals. Samtani has won several awards for his research and teaching efforts, including the ACM SIGMIS Doctoral Dissertation award in 2019. Samtani has received media attention from outlets such as Miami Herald, Fox, Science Magazine, AAAS, and the Penny Hoarder. He is a member of AIS, ACM, IEEE, INFORMS, and INNS.

    • 59 min
    Apr 2021: Trusted CI webinar: Arizona State's Science DMZ

    Apr 2021: Trusted CI webinar: Arizona State's Science DMZ

    Drawing upon its mission to enable access to discovery and scholarship, Arizona State University is deploying an advanced research network employing the Science DMZ architecture. While advancing knowledge of managing 21st-century cyberinfrastructure in a large public research university, this project also advances how network cyberinfrastructure supports research and education in science, engineering, and health.

    Replacing existing edge network equipment and installing an optimized, tuned Data Transfer Node provides a friction-free wide area network path and streamlined research data movement. A strict router access control list and intrusion detection system provide security within the Science DMZ, and end-to-end network performance measurement via perfSONAR guards against issues such as packet loss.

    Recognizing that the operation of the Science DMZ must not compromise the university’s network security profile, while at the same time avoiding the performance penalty associated with perimeter firewall devices, data access and transfer services will be protected by access control lists on the Science DMZ border router as well as host-level security measures. Additionally, the system architecture employs the anti-IP spoofing tool Spoofer, the Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Zeek, data-sharing honeypot tool STINGAR, traditional honeypot/darknet/tarpit tools, as well as other open-source software.

    Finally, Science data flows are supported by a process incorporating user engagement, iterative technical improvements, training, documentation, and follow-up.

    Speaker Bios:

    Douglas Jennewein is Senior Director for Research Computing in the Research Technology Office at Arizona State University. He has supported computational and data-enabled science since 2003 when he built his first supercomputer from a collection of surplus-bound PCs. He currently architects, funds, and deploys research cyberinfrastructure including advanced networks, supercomputers, and big data archives. He has also served on the NSF XSEDE Campus Champions Leadership Team since 2016 and has chaired that group since 2020. Jennewein is a certified Software Carpentry instructor and has successfully directed cyberinfrastructure projects funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the US Department of Agriculture totaling over $4M.

    Chris Kurtz is the Senior Systems Architect for the Research Technology Office in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise at Arizona State University. Previously Chris was the Director of Public Cloud Engineering as well as the Splunk System Architect (and Evangelist) at ASU. He has been appointed as Splunk Trust Community MVP since its inception. Chris is a regular speaker on Splunk and Higher Education, including multiple presentations at Educause, Educause Security Professionals,  and Splunk’s yearly “.conf" Conference. Prior to architecting Splunk, he was the Systems Manager of the Mars Space Flight Facility at ASU, a NASA/JPL funded research group, where he supported numerous Mars Missions including TES, THEMIS, and the Spirit and Opportunity Rovers. Chris lives in Mesa, Arizona along with his wife, rescue dogs, and cat.

    • 56 min
    • video
    Bonus episode: Operationalizing the Framework: Getting management to understand cybersecurity

    Bonus episode: Operationalizing the Framework: Getting management to understand cybersecurity

    We have a bonus podcast episode, it is brought to us by our partners at the ReserachSOC.

    In March of this year, Trusted CI published its Framework Implementation Guide for Research Cyberinfrastructure Operators.

    In this podcast episode, Craig Jackson, architect of the Trusted CI Framework and Susan Sons, Deputy Director of Research SOC, discuss how to use the Framework to enhance relationships with key stakeholders while driving forward action to improve the overall cybersecurity posture of an organization.

    You can learn more about the Framework at trustedci.org/framework, or the ResearchSOC at researchsoc.iu.edu.

    • 53 min
    May 2016: Webinar Series Kick-off

    May 2016: Webinar Series Kick-off

    In January 2016 we announced that CTSC was named NSF's Cybersecurity of Excellence. Its role is to provide readily available cybersecurity services tailored to the NSF science community. With this in mind, we are announcing the CCoE Webinar Series. The kickoff presentation will be presented by members of the CTSC Leadership Team and focuses on who we are, our activities, projects, and areas we can assist the community. Presentations will be recorded and include time for questions with the audience.

    • 44 min
    Jun 2016: Risk Self-Evaluation

    Jun 2016: Risk Self-Evaluation

    This talk will present a self-evaluation spreadsheet which can be used by projects to make an initial assessment of their cybersecurity readiness. The spreadsheet is based on the “Securing Commodity IT in Scientific CI Projects” document available as part of CTSC’s Guide to Developing Cybersecurity Programs for NSF Science and Engineering Projects.

    More information can be found at: http://trustedci.org/guide

    This talk is presented by CTSC's Terry Fleury

    • 30 min
    Jul 2016: XSEDE Information Sharing,

    Jul 2016: XSEDE Information Sharing,

    The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) is the most advanced, powerful, and robust collection of integrated advanced digital resources and services in the world. It is a single virtual system that scientists can use to interactively share computing resources, data, and expertise. This session will provide an overview of the XSEDE information security program used to protect information and assets for the $121 million dollar project. Focus areas will include information sharing, policies and procedures, incident response and security awareness training.

    This talk is presented by CTSC's James Marsteller.

    • 42 min

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