9 episodes

Join Jeff Byers, founder of Magnet Coil Media, as he interviews thought leaders on healthcare services, social drivers of health, communications, and the ideas that shape them.

magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

Unlisted Unlisted by Magnet Coil Media

    • Business
    • 5.0, 4 Ratings

Join Jeff Byers, founder of Magnet Coil Media, as he interviews thought leaders on healthcare services, social drivers of health, communications, and the ideas that shape them.

magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    How to start a business during a pandemic w/ Rachel Ford Hutman

    How to start a business during a pandemic w/ Rachel Ford Hutman

    Hello and welcome to Unlisted, a Magnet Coil Media podcast.

    On today’s episode, we chat with Rachel Ford Hutman, Founder of Ford Hutman Media, a media relations and communications firm based out of San Diego, California.

    Rachel started her own firm in early 2020 after working many years with IBM Watson Health. Little did she know when she started the company that the COVID-19 pandemic was about to change the fabric of American life.

    We talk about the challenges and realities of launching a new company during the pandemic and how she knew she was ready to go out on her own, pandemic notwithstanding.

    We also touch on why she thinks conferences won’t be as big of a deal after 2020, why relationships matter, and how storytelling can be a differentiator in the healthcare industry.

    Substack isn’t the only place you can find this podcast:

    Apple Podcasts

    Stitcher

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    Google Podcasts

    Please leave a review to help audiences find us. If you’re interested in chatting, my email is jeff@magnetcoilmedia.com.

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 36 min
    On Richmond monuments and the dangers of nostalgia w/ Chris L. Terry, author of Black Card

    On Richmond monuments and the dangers of nostalgia w/ Chris L. Terry, author of Black Card

    Hello and welcome to Unlisted.

    Chris L. Terry is an author based out of Los Angeles, California. His second novel, Black Card, will be published in paperback this August. It was released about a year ago in hardcover.

    Author photo by Jacob Boll

    Black Card is a story about a young mixed-race punk rock musician in Richmond, VA who explores his identity. The book has been reviewed and featured in NPR, Pitchfork, among other publications.

    Black Card is Chris’s second novel. In 2013, he published the young adult novel Zero Fade.

    Before relocating to Los Angeles, Chris spent some of his youth in Richmond, VA. He and I were in the same English department at VCU and played in a punk band together.

    I spoke with Chris a year ago when his novel was first being published. I wanted to repurpose that interview for this publication/project but, with the paperback to be published on the eve of the novel’s first birthday, I thought it might be a great time to catch up with him to see how the response to the book has been.

    Our conversation was recorded on July 14, 2020.

    We talk about the dangers of nostalgia, why racism is a public health issue, and his perspective on the Richmond Confederate statues coming down.

    Substack isn’t the only place you can find this podcast:

    Apple Podcasts

    Stitcher

    Spotify

    Thanks for listening. If you’re interested in chatting, my email is jeff@magnetcoilmedia.com.

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 31 min
    Healthcare marketing's weird year w/ ReviveHealth's Stephanie Wierwille

    Healthcare marketing's weird year w/ ReviveHealth's Stephanie Wierwille

    Welcome to Unlisted, a healthcare and/or culture newsletter and/or podcast.

    On today’s episode, I chat with Stephanie Wierwille, VP of Content at ReviveHealth. It was recorded on July 7, 2020.

    But first, a fair amount of work I helped with went live last week. Check it out:

    For Clear Skye (identity governance and admin tech):

    About Us / Company Overview Page - This project was a lot of fun as I got to add some levity to a company’s story.

    Customer Success Stories (Gated)

    For Healthify, two (2) blogs:

    How data sharing and interoperability will evolve after COVID-19

    Podcast Recap: Transforming SDoH services in the age of COVID-19

    I would love to chat about any content projects you may have. Email me at jeff@magnetcoilmedia.com.

    Healthcare marketers are living in “The No Normal,” according to ReviveHealth.

    Stephanie Wierwille, VP of Content at ReviveHealth, and I worked together during my time at Revive in Music City, USA. I always enjoyed discussing influencers and pondering life’s big questions with her, like how effective is snarky fast food Twitter marketing. I learned a lot from her and she was great to work with.

    I wanted to speak with Stephanie about what she’s seeing in 2020 from a healthcare marketing perspective. We hit on a lot of topics including health inequity, digital transformation, and how healthcare organizations are adapting to messaging as the COVID-19 pandemic affects their communities and finances.

    We also talk about the Facebook boycott and how marketers are discussing the movement. I mention a A Media Operator essay about the subject wherein I butcher Jacob’s analysis. Apologies all around but it’s worth a read.

    Substack isn’t the only place you can find this podcast:

    Apple Podcasts

    Stitcher

    Spotify

    I would love to hear feedback on these episodes and the newsletter in general. Are you enjoying it? Any guests or topics you’d like to hear about? I’m all ears. jeff@magnetcoilmedia.com.

    Thanks for listening and see you next time.

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 23 min
    What happens to the insurance industry under a Medicare-for-All plan w/ insurance broker Josh Viles

    What happens to the insurance industry under a Medicare-for-All plan w/ insurance broker Josh Viles

    Welcome back to Unlisted!

    Last week, a perspective brief I co-developed with Healthify was published. It was written for payer audiences to learn more about measuring the effectiveness of SDoH interventions. You can download it here.

    On this week’s podcast, I talk with insurance broker Josh Viles.

    Josh lives here in Richmond, VA and was on the ground level as an insurance broker at the start of the ACA marketplace.

    Josh and I spoke about how the markets look different now than six years ago and what would happen to the insurance industry if and when the U.S. moves to a centralized government health plan such as a single payer or Medicare for All program.

    If you can believe it, it’s an election year. It’s likely the ACA and insurance markets may come up again during the debates. Just in the not too distant memory of June, President Trump argued to strike the ACA.

    Josh believes there would be five to ten years of pain if the U.S. moves to a M4A or single payer model as it’s difficult to decimate an entire industry.

    John clearly has a mission statement to help people. If you’re new to the health insurance conversation, Josh helps frame what you can expect from the ACA marketplace and managing the uncertainty unemployment can create during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    If you’re a healthcare industry veteran, I hope Josh’s perspective as an insurance broker offers a somewhat fresh perspective as compared to the high level, thought leadership pieces that circulate from time to time.

    Thanks for listening. You can find Viles Insurance online here.

    Substack isn’t the only place you can find this podcast:

    Apple Podcasts

    Stitcher

    Spotify

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 19 min
    Why 'plant-based' is preferred to 'vegan' w/ Food Dive's Megan Poinski

    Why 'plant-based' is preferred to 'vegan' w/ Food Dive's Megan Poinski

    Hello and welcome to Unlisted. If you’re new here, thanks for joining. Consider subscribing below.

    Like the new logo up top? My friend Matt Leech made it. Check out his design work here.

    On today’s episode, we have Megan Poinski, Senior Reporter for Food Dive. We talk about plant-based meats.

    I was really excited for this conversation. I’m a pescatarian but have been vegetarian off-and-on since I was 16 years old, largely influenced by the punk and indie rock subcultures of the late ‘90s. As I got older, I began to play music myself, eventually jumping into a van to play 20 minutes of music to crowds of 5-45 people on any given night across the country.

    That old band, Light the Fuse and Run, recently re-created an old shirt if interested. All profits go to The Movement for Black Lives.

    The years: 2002 to 2003. To be honest, I can’t remember the diets of everyone but I was definitely a vegetarian and remember another member was vegan. In the early aughts, the number of cheap, fast vegetarian food was hard enough to find, much less vegan food.

    There was Taco Bell. Burger King had launched a veggie burger in 2002. Subway had the Veggie Delite. And that was it. Those were the options.

    Now, plant-based meat is relatively easy to find. Burger King has upgraded to a deal with Impossible Burger while Carl’s Jr., Dunkin, Del Taco, White Castle, and more are all promoting plant-based meat options.

    Because I am out of touch, I don’t know how vibrant the punk DIY touring community is currently, but I can say with certainty that if I was doing that today, I would be thrilled to have all these meat alternative options.

    But I also wondered where all these options were two decades ago. Veggie burgers existed. Boca Burgers and Morning Star burgers were all available during that time.

    And I realized, these plant-based meat products are not strictly for subcultures. They’re intended for mass consumption. Someone decided there was a mass market for these products and then convinced others of its viability.

    I talk with Megan about this in addition to why the term “plant-based” is preferred to “vegan” when promoting these products, what the future looks like for plant-based alternatives, and whether they are actually healthier than the real thing (Spoiler alert: more research is needed).

    Here is some of the recent coverage from Food Dive on the plant-based protein movement:

    Tracking the plant-based protein movement

    Is plant-based meat really healthier than the real thing? (Here’s the link to the JAMA article it cites)

    For further reading/listening:

    Impossible Foods Impact Report 2019

    Animal Rights as Media and Pop Culture Punchline (Citations Needed Podcast)

    Is this a healthcare podcast or a culture podcast? Not really sure but I hope you’re enjoying the ride.

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 20 min
    "If it wasn't so harmful, it would be hilarious how stupid the way we treat healthcare is" - Luke O'Neil

    "If it wasn't so harmful, it would be hilarious how stupid the way we treat healthcare is" - Luke O'Neil

    Hello and welcome to Unlisted. If this is your first entry point here, please consider subscribing.

    On today’s episode, we have Luke O’Neil, author of the Welcome to Hell World newsletter and the book Hell World: Dispatches from the American Dystopia. The discussion was recorded on May 14th, 2020.

    I have been a Hell World subscriber for about a year to a year and a half. I believe I found it through Luke’s Twitter account coming up in my feed every so often before I hit “follow.”

    Luke’s voice and the Hell World publication overall captivated me. The voice has a fresh perspective but it can undoubtedly take some getting used to as you wade into a mixture of journalism, personal essay, interviews, poetry, and random musings on the Deftones.

    Most of the pieces describe how Americans struggle with daily life in the face of capitalism. As an example, a recent piece collected thoughts from service workers about their view into “reopening” America in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

    I admire Luke’s work and appreciate the time he spent with me discussing journalism and his views on the healthcare industry.

    Hell World is also one of the first newsletter success stories on the Substack platform. “Newsletters” have been getting a fair amount of press recently. It’s not surprising.

    Reports have estimated that more than 37.2 million Americans could be out of work, according to a data round-up of unemployment claims (Axios). Many of those layoffs have occurred in media, including The Athletic, The Atlantic, TheSkimm, and more.

    Some writers may turn to Substack platforms to pursue financial and creative freedom. With Hell World, O’Neil — who has been freelance writing for two decades — said it was one of the most creatively fulfilling decisions he’s made and, because of that decision, he finds himself more financially stable.

    "It’s uncomfortable to actually not be panicking over when my next $300 check is going to get here, which is a situation that any freelance writer will be all too familiar with,” O’Neil said.

    Newsletters also are helping to create better relationships with readers. It’s a topic that I spoke about with Out of Pocket’s Nikhil Krishnan last week.

    Substack is offering support in exploring what’s possible for any writer recently laid off. A number of Substack writers — including Luke — have volunteered to offer advice calls. Check out the Substack Blog for more information.

    Thanks for listening. Get in touch at jeff@magnetcoilmedia.com.

    Get on the email list at magnetcoilmedia.substack.com

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

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moteacups ,

GET IT JEFF

Great stuff, keep it up!

WONK N ROLL ,

Not sure how I stumbled upon this ... but I’m glad I did!

If that rocking, riffing intro song doesn’t hook you right away, the insight convos, timely topics and the host’s quirky asides probably will!

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