6 episodes

Urban Roots is hosted by Deqah Hussein (historic preservationist and urban planner) and Vanessa Quirk (journalist and producer). This podcast offers a holistic narrative of urban America by utilizing rich archival materials, interviewing passionate local experts, and exploring “untold” stories.

There are many stories that have not been told and many topics that have not been fully explored. This podcast challenges you to think beyond the familiar, and broaden the scope of what we see as urban history to conceptualize what shaped our communities.

Urban Roots Deqah & Vanessa

    • History
    • 5.0 • 19 Ratings

Urban Roots is hosted by Deqah Hussein (historic preservationist and urban planner) and Vanessa Quirk (journalist and producer). This podcast offers a holistic narrative of urban America by utilizing rich archival materials, interviewing passionate local experts, and exploring “untold” stories.

There are many stories that have not been told and many topics that have not been fully explored. This podcast challenges you to think beyond the familiar, and broaden the scope of what we see as urban history to conceptualize what shaped our communities.

    South Cumminsville: For the Love of the Neighborhood

    South Cumminsville: For the Love of the Neighborhood

    In this episode, the final of our Lost Voices of Cincinnati series*, we’re exploring the history of South Cumminsville, a neighborhood that, like many Black neighborhoods in Cincinnati, has been divided and diminished by top-down urban planning decisions and years of disinvestment. But it’s also a place with a long history of Black entrepreneurship, ownership, and activism — going back to the late 1800s, when unsung Cincinnati hero Sarah Fossett helped make South Cumminsville a vibrant community for African Americans. Today, it remains a place where residents support each other and fight every day to improve their community.


    Part I:  A Tour of South Cumminsville [0:00 - 06:25]

    Part II: Sarah Fossett, a Cincinnati hero [06:26 - 16:12]

    Part III: The West End, the Highway, and a Riot [16:13 - 21:34]

    Part IV: Community Action and a Vision for the Future [21:35 - 27:40]


    *If you missed our prelude episode, then take a pause and listen to that show first! Also, check out our previous episodes on the Evanston and Avondale neighborhoods!

    Guests

    Our guests include South Cumminsville community council president, Tim Canady, vice president Derek Fagin, Annie Williams, Alberta Warton, Queens of Queens City’s Sean Andres, Wilbur Canady, and Working in Neighborhoods’ Rigel Behrens.

    Sponsors

    The Lost Voices of Cincinnati series was made possible by a Truth & Reconciliation grant from ArtsWave. We need help for future projects so please consider donating to our Fundly fundraising campaign!

    Find Us Online

    - Website: [http://urbanrootspodcast.com]

    - Fundly: [https://fundly.com/urban-roots-podcast-fundraising]

    - Instagram: [https://www.instagram.com/urbanrootsculture/]

    - Twitter: [https://twitter.com/urbanrootspod]

    - Facebook: [https://www.facebook.com/urbanrootspodcast]

    - YouTube: [https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWgJCHAvfWsxwq4nVn5-dgg]

    Credits

    - Host and Executive Producer: Deqah Hussein-Wetzel. Website: [https://urbanistmedia.org/]

    - Host and Executive Producer: Vanessa Maria Quirk. Website: [https://vanessaquirk.com/]

    - Editor: Connor Lynch. Website: [http://www.connor-lynch.com/]

    - Story Editor: Max Miller. Website: [https://www.linkedin.com/in/max-p-miller-5579759/]

    - Mix: Andrew Callaway. Website: [http://callawaythings.com/]

    About Us

    Urban Roots is a podcast that takes a deep dive into little known stories from Urban history.

    • 29 min
    Avondale: It Takes a Village

    Avondale: It Takes a Village

    In this episode, the third of our Lost Voices of Cincinnati series*, we’re exploring the history of Avondale, a neighborhood that experienced a different kind of white flight and is still recovering from transformative events that occurred during the mid-century such as race riots and housing discrimination. We will discuss how these trends triggered decades of disinvestment and explain important historical terms like blockbusting and redlining. And we talk to the people who are fighting hard to preserve the neighborhood’s housing stock, promote local businesses — and bring the community back together.

    Part I:  Welcome to Avondale [0:00-05:19]

    Part II: Early Avondale History [06:23 - 08:11]

    Part III: Avondale the Good Old Days [8:12-11:34]

    Part IV: Racist Real Estate [11:35-18:11]

    Part V: A Neighborhood Divided [18:12-21:25]

    Part VI: Difficult Times + Interstate Expansion  [21:26-25:33]

    Part VII: Today + Hope for Tomorrow [25.34-33:25]

    *If you missed our prelude episode, then take a pause and listen to that show first! Also, check out our previous episode on the Evanston neighborhood!

    Guests

    Our guests include Avondale neighborhood community council president, Ms. Sandra Jones-Mitchel, Councilwoman Jan-Michelle Lemon Kearney, and Invest in Neighborhoods board president, Andria Carter. We also got a deep dive into the history of housing in Avondale by retired University of Cincinnati history professor, Dr. Fritz Casey Leininger.

    Sponsors
    The Lost Voices of Cincinnati series was made possible by a Truth & Reconciliation grant from ArtsWave. We need help for future projects so please so considering donating to our Fundly fundraising campaign!

    Credits

    Host and Executive Producer: Deqah Hussein-Wetzel.

    Host and Executive Producer: Vanessa Maria Quirk.

    Editor: Connor Lynch.

    Mix: Andrew Callaway.



    Find Us Online: Website | Fundly | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube

    • 33 min
    Evanston: A Kingdom Divided

    Evanston: A Kingdom Divided

    In this episode, the first of our Lost Voices of Cincinnati series*, we’re exploring the history of Evanston, the home of King Records, which was pivotal to the creation of Rock n' Roll music. We not only discuss King, but also another important anchor in the neighborhood, St. Mark’s, that has also been left to deteriorate over time. We explain how the highway divided the neighborhood, and kicked off years of disinvestment. And we talk to the people who are fighting hard to preserve the neighborhood’s precious landmarks — and bring the community back together.

    Part I: King Records [0:00-08:52]

    Part II: Before the highway [09:45-17:12]

    Part III: A neighborhood divided [17:13-28:22]

    Part IV: Bridges to the future [28:23-33:02]



    *If you missed our prelude episode, then take a pause and check out that show first!

    Guests:

    Our guests include Evanston neighborhood community council members, Mr. James Stallworth (president), Ms. Marye Ward, Ms. Beverley Lamb, and Ms. Veta Uddin as well as members of the King Legacy committee, Kent Butts and Elliott Ruther, and also historian Dr. M. Christine Anderson, and preservationist and AmeriCorps member, Carrie Rhodus.

    P.S. Ms. Marye Ward has been part of The Mark, a group trying to purchase and preserve St. Mark’s. Consider donating to The Mark today!

    Sponsors:

    The Lost Voices of Cincinnati series was made possible by a Truth & Reconciliation grant from ArtsWave. We need help for future projects so please so considering donating to our Fundly fundraising campaign! 

    Credits:

    Host and Executive Producer: Deqah Hussein-Wetzel  / Host and Executive Producer: Vanessa Maria Quirk / Editor: Connor Lynch / Mix: Andrew Callaway

    • 34 min
    Cincinnati History is Black History

    Cincinnati History is Black History

    We are so excited to kick off our Lost Voices of Cincinnati series which explores the rich African American history of Cincinnati. You can think of this episode as a kind of prelude of sorts. We go back, way back, to Cincinnati’s beginnings, and tell stories you’ve probably never heard — like how a Cincinnati barber helped execute the biggest North American escape of enslaved people, ever; how and why a mob attacked Cincinnati’s African American community (with cannons, no less) in 1841; and how the West End became one of the most happening Black communities of the 1920s. We show how, throughout the city’s history, African American communities have always faced adversity — but have also always banded together to not only persevere, but thrive.


    Part I: The tale of the escape of the 28 [0:00-08:23] 
    Part II: Early Cincinnati history with Professor Eric Jackson [08:24-17:48] 
    Part III: A sneak peek of what’s to come  [17:49-22:37]

    Urban Roots is a podcast that takes a deep dive into little known stories from Urban history. We’re hosted by historic preservationist Deqah Hussein-Wetzel and journalist Vanessa Quirk. We’re edited by Connor Lynch and mixed by Tim Soarce. Our theme music is by Adaam James Levin-Areddy. Our logo is by Deqah H.W., Shanon Shipley, and Gwyneth Lynn Ravenscraft.

    Our Lost Voices of Cincinnati series was made possible by a Truth & Reconciliation grant from ArtsWave and our Fundly patrons (Donations always needed/welcomed!). We’d also like to thank Invest in Neighborhoods for their support.

    • 22 min
    Lost Voices of Cincinnati Series - Trailer

    Lost Voices of Cincinnati Series - Trailer

    The Lost Voices of Cincinnati series will holistically explore the physical and social transformations three neighborhoods have experienced and endured in Cincinnati, Ohio — Avondale, Evanston, and South Cumminsville. There is so much that has been lost—some things were gained—and stuff that remains. Despite the odds, these resilient communities have worked hard to preserve their histories and build strong, vibrant neighborhoods today. This project offers these folks an auditory outlet to express their truth and help them reconcile with the permanent social and physical landscape changes rendered by past and present planning efforts. We hope that, though this project, within these communities of color, those lost voices of Cincinnati will finally be heard.

    • 1 min
    Introduction: Who We Are

    Introduction: Who We Are

    We often take history for granted, skirting around subjects as if we already know everything there is to know about a historical event, person, or place. But, what do we really know?

    There are many stories that have not been told and many topics that have not been fully explored. This podcast challenges you to think beyond the familiar, and broaden the scope of what we see as urban history.

    Urban Roots is hosted by Deqah Hussein (historic preservationist and urban planner) and Vanessa Quirk (journalist and producer). This podcast offers a holistic narrative of urban America by utilizing rich archival materials, interviewing passionate local experts, and exploring “untold” stories.

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

Plughtwo ,

Amazing Show

If you live in Cincinnati, you NEED to listen to this show. Context for every inch of the streets we see each day. Great use of music, and fascinating stories throughout.

Glen Montgomery ,

Powerful stories of a city I love

Thank you so much for making this. The first episode made me so proud of one of my favorite cities, but also so angry at the same time. Important to unearth these so we can heal and grow together. Fantastic production as well, I can’t wait for more.

Sira1245 ,

Excellent podcast

Very informative and relevant to the time, can’t wait for the up coming episodes.

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