15 episodes

This podcast tour explores the past, present, and future of NYC’s water supply in the Catskills. It tells the story of the complicated relationship between the Catskills and NYC that is forged by water infrastructure. You'll visit 10 resonant places in the watershed and hear firsthand, intimate perspectives from local people including a historian, a dairy farmer, a former DEP commissioner, a grave restorer, and a trail builder on what it means to be a part of the water system. (Please start at the Introduction episode.) Visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/ for more info and a tour map.

Views from the Watershed Lize Mogel

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

This podcast tour explores the past, present, and future of NYC’s water supply in the Catskills. It tells the story of the complicated relationship between the Catskills and NYC that is forged by water infrastructure. You'll visit 10 resonant places in the watershed and hear firsthand, intimate perspectives from local people including a historian, a dairy farmer, a former DEP commissioner, a grave restorer, and a trail builder on what it means to be a part of the water system. (Please start at the Introduction episode.) Visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/ for more info and a tour map.

    Gone But Not Forgotten

    Gone But Not Forgotten

    The Pepacton Cemetery is a remote and resonant place. Like all cemeteries, it’s a marker of loss-- not just the loss of individual people, but of entire communities that were displaced to build the water system. This episode features historian and grave restorer Marianne Greenfield.

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode at the Pepacton Cemetery. Accessibility: the cemetery is not wheelchair accessible, as the terrain is mowed grass and sloped. However, you can view it from the side of the road. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information

    • 9 min
    Putting the "Public" in Public Lands

    Putting the "Public" in Public Lands

    NYC owns a lot of land and water in the Catskills. You can walk (or paddle) on some of it because people advocated for that access, and did the work to build paths through it. Just watch out for snakes in the pond! This episode features trail builder Ann Roberti, president of the Catskill Mountain Club.

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode while on the Shavertown Trail or at the Shavertown Boat Launch at the Pepacton Reservoir. If you don't have a DEP access permit, please park in the area at the side of the road. Accessibility: the parking area is hard-packed. There is a ramp down to the reservoir at the north end of the parking lot. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information.

    • 12 min
    Tapping the Delaware

    Tapping the Delaware

    New York City needed more water, it set out to tap the Delaware River (much to New Jersey's dismay!). The construction of the Pepacton Reservoir, which was completed in the mid-50s, and the displacement that it entailed, are still within the living memory of this part of the Catskills. This episode features historian Diane Galusha; Adam Bosch, DEP's Director of Public Affairs for the NYC water supply; and historian and grave restorer Marianne Greenfield.

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode at the Shavertown Boat Launch at the Pepacton Reservoir. If you don't have a DEP access permit, please park in the area at the side of the road and walk down. Accessibility: the parking area is hard-packed. There is a ramp down to the reservoir at the north end of the parking lot. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information.

    • 10 min
    After the Storm (Part 2)

    After the Storm (Part 2)

    Hurricane Irene raised concerns about the Gilboa Dam and the ability of water infrastructure to manage the massive amounts of water produced by large storms. How the DEP is preparing for the impacts of climate change in our future. This episode features Adam Bosch, DEP's Director of Public Affairs for the NYC water supply.

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode at Devasego Park in Prattsville, on the banks of Schoharie Creek. Accessibility: the parking lot has a hard-packed surface which is accessible, and the park is mowed grass which is less so. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information.

    Photo: NYC Department of Environmental Protection

    • 4 min
    After the Storm (Part 1)

    After the Storm (Part 1)

    In 2011 Hurricane Irene roared through the Catskills "like a fire hose going through an anthill." But yet, the Catskills persisted. The story of Hurricane Irene is one of devastation and resilience. It also illuminates the complicated relationship between human development, water infrastructure, and natural forces. This episode features Catskills journalists Lissa Harris and Tim Knight, who covered Irene.

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode anywhere on Main Street in Prattsville. Accessibility: Downtown Prattsville is paved and wheelchair accessible. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information.

    • 15 min
    The Whole Farm Plan

    The Whole Farm Plan

    Dairy farming is hard. In the 1990s, new watershed regulations would have made it even harder, if not impossible. Farmers pushed back, organized and eventually collaborated with the City to come up with a plan that would benefit everyone-- the City would pay farmers to modernize, and farmers would be able to keep cow poop out of the water. This episode features Fred Huneke, retired dairy farmer. 

    If you're taking this tour in person, please play this episode at the Hubbell Homestead historic sign on Route 30. Accessibility: the turnaround has a somewhat uneven hard-packed surface, but you can view the site from your car. Please visit walkingthewatershed.com/podcasttour/listen.html to download a printed map, transcripts, accessibility info, and other important information.

    • 10 min

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