5 episodes

The central text in the canon of Latin literature is Virgil’s Aeneid, an epic poem in twelve books composed more than two thousand years ago under the Roman emperor Augustus. The poem was an instant hit. It became a school text immediately and has remained central to studies of Roman culture to the present day. How can a poem created in such a remote literary and social environment speak so eloquently to subsequent ages? In this course we will discover what kind of poem this is and what kind of hero Aeneas is. Our studies will focus chiefly on the poem itself and on wider aspects of Roman culture.


Presented by the Stanford Continuing Studies Program.

Virgil's Aeneid Stanford

    • Arts
    • 3.9, 50 Ratings

The central text in the canon of Latin literature is Virgil’s Aeneid, an epic poem in twelve books composed more than two thousand years ago under the Roman emperor Augustus. The poem was an instant hit. It became a school text immediately and has remained central to studies of Roman culture to the present day. How can a poem created in such a remote literary and social environment speak so eloquently to subsequent ages? In this course we will discover what kind of poem this is and what kind of hero Aeneas is. Our studies will focus chiefly on the poem itself and on wider aspects of Roman culture.


Presented by the Stanford Continuing Studies Program.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
50 Ratings

50 Ratings

ChadCMulligan ,

Inefficient Class Management

I’ve invested 4 hours now, and am giving it up—the amount of knowledge transferred per minute is extremely low, and ANY of the commercial “Notes” books will enable you to learn in a faster, more substantive, and orderly way. I come in with past classroom study of the Iliad and Odyssey, and expect real focus on the essentials that you need to “get” the work. This dear instructor doesn’t have a firm intent to get that done—and the “open mike” approach (any and all class questions and comments are allowed to interrupt and divert), combined with nonexistent editing of the recording, means that it moves at a painfully slow pace and just doesn’t deliver. This is STANFORD??

NomeNemoN ,

Embarrassing

You could fill volumes with what this narrow specialist does not know. At one point, her student even knows more about the plot inconsistencies of the Aeneid than she does. I just felt bad for her students the whole time. Rather than going to the library and doing the research to answer their questions about archaeology or early Italian, she takes the lazy way out. She is my anti-role model as a teacher and as a scholar.

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