39 episodes

‘Walk Among Heroes’ is a podcast that presents real stories from the bravest men and women in the world, real military heroes. Jeff Wells, Veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, hosts a military hero on his show each week, as these incredible heroes tell their stories, unedited and in their own words. From the sights, sounds, and smells of combat, to their secrets for a long and successful life, these Veterans tell all. This podcast is perfect for anyone who wants to learn about our nation’s history, and most importantly, wants to understand the intimate details of those who fought to provide us with the greatest privilege in the world, freedom. Wars are not won by generals standing in front of maps. They are won by the men on the ground, fighting through near-impossible odds to ensure our liberty will never falter. Unlike other podcasts that focus on higher-level military history, ‘Walk Among Heroes’ brings you stories and perspectives from those closest to the battles: the Ground-Pounders, G.I.’s, Dog Faces, Doughboys, Grunts, Sailors, Flyboys, Squids, Frogmen, Devil Dogs, Leathernecks, and others who were on the ground, in the arena, fighting for our great nation. Hear their stories and perspectives as ‘Walk Among Heroes’ strives to ensure they are never forgotten. A new episode will be released every Tuesday. To check out more stories from our great heroes, visit walkamongheroes.org.

Walk Among Heroes Jeff Wells

    • History
    • 4.9 • 38 Ratings

‘Walk Among Heroes’ is a podcast that presents real stories from the bravest men and women in the world, real military heroes. Jeff Wells, Veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, hosts a military hero on his show each week, as these incredible heroes tell their stories, unedited and in their own words. From the sights, sounds, and smells of combat, to their secrets for a long and successful life, these Veterans tell all. This podcast is perfect for anyone who wants to learn about our nation’s history, and most importantly, wants to understand the intimate details of those who fought to provide us with the greatest privilege in the world, freedom. Wars are not won by generals standing in front of maps. They are won by the men on the ground, fighting through near-impossible odds to ensure our liberty will never falter. Unlike other podcasts that focus on higher-level military history, ‘Walk Among Heroes’ brings you stories and perspectives from those closest to the battles: the Ground-Pounders, G.I.’s, Dog Faces, Doughboys, Grunts, Sailors, Flyboys, Squids, Frogmen, Devil Dogs, Leathernecks, and others who were on the ground, in the arena, fighting for our great nation. Hear their stories and perspectives as ‘Walk Among Heroes’ strives to ensure they are never forgotten. A new episode will be released every Tuesday. To check out more stories from our great heroes, visit walkamongheroes.org.

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast: Episode 22A - Larry Kirby (US Marine Corps, 3rd Division, Guam, Iwo Jima)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast: Episode 22A - Larry Kirby (US Marine Corps, 3rd Division, Guam, Iwo Jima)

    We are honored to welcome Larry Kirby, United States Marine Corps, as our guest for episode 22.  Mr. Kirby was born and raised in the northeastern United States.  In the spring of 1942, Mr. Kirby walked out of St. Mary’s high school and joined the Marine Corps.  With a massive physique of 5’6” tall and 135 lbs, Mr. Kirby was not your prototypical Marine.  He suffered through boot camp in Paris Island, SC, where his first encounter with a Drill Sergeant resulted in a punch to Mr. Kirby’s face.  
     After boot camp, Mr. Kirby travelled west across the United States making stops in Camp Lejeune, Nebraska, and Camp Pendleton, for various types of training.  He was trained as a scout, which meant he would move ahead of the Infantry to observe the enemy and provide intelligence back to the Marines.  Upon arrival in the South Pacific, Mr. Kirby was assigned to Easy Company of the 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division.  The young Marines wasted no time, landing in Bougainville,  Mr. Kirby’s first combat.  
     After Bougainville, Mr. Kirby and the Marines from 3rd Division invaded the Mariana Islands, with Guam as the objective for Mr. Kirby’s unit.  Mr. Kirby faced heavy combat in Guam, including one of the largest and most vicious Bonzai attacks of the war.  Mr. Kirby was wounded by a Japanese hand grenade during a one-on-one confrontation with a young Japanese soldier.  He also lost his best friend, who died in Mr. Kirby’s arms.  After being wounded, Mr. Kirby was evacuated for a short period, but he refused to leave his men.  He rejoined his unit shortly after being wounded and following the conclusion of a ‘successful’ campaign in Guam, 3rd Division made Guam home base while preparing for the fateful invasion of Iwo Jima.  
     In February 1945, Mr. Kirby landed on Iwo Jima and began fighting for 22 straight days in some of the most brutal combat our nation has ever faced.  Of the 230 Marines who landed with Easy Company, only Mr. Kirby and six other men walked off that island.  
     Mr. Kirby has documented many of his experiences by writing a book, ‘Stories from the Pacific:  The Island War 1942-1945.’  His book can be purchased on Amazon, and we HIGHLY recommend it.  Not only are his combat stories phenomenal, he has so many hilarious stories about life as a young Marine.  Most fascinating (to us) are his perspectives on the combat, the military, and war in general.  For those of us who have been in combat, Mr. Kirby was able to put into words what many of us feel but can’t say.  His perspectives really resonated with us, and we sincerely hope you’ll order his book.  It’s a must read, in our opinion, especially if you’re interested in World War II, the Pacific Theatre, or you’ve never served but would like a small taste of what combat is really like.
     We want to thank Mr. Kirby for sharing his story.  He discussed some very difficult topics, and we believe his words are enlightening for those who served in the military, or those who never served at all.  This is our first four-part series.  Part 1 (Episode 22A) will cover his childhood, joining the Marine Corps, boot camp, and deployment overseas.  Part 2 (22B) will dive into Mr. Kirby’s first combat in Bougainville and then Guam (some of Mr. Kirby’s most difficult memories were experiences he faced on Guam).  Part 3 (22C) will focus on Iwo Jima, and Part 4 (22D) will cover the final chapter in his book, which is simply amazing.
     God Bless men like Mr. Kirby.  None of us would be here today without Mr. Kirby, and the millions of young men who sacrificed their lives to provide us with the greatest privilege in the world, FREEDOM.  Mr. Kirby is a hero of the highest degree, and we are proud to call him our friend.  A huge ‘thank you’ to Shrey

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Walk Among Heroes Podcast: Episode 21B - Kenneth 'K.P.' Platt Part 2 (Survived the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast: Episode 21B - Kenneth 'K.P.' Platt Part 2 (Survived the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor)

    Don't miss the conclusion of our two-part interview with Kenneth 'K.P.' Platt.  K.P., born and raised in Texas, never graduated high school.  He left school permanently in the seventh grade and joined the Army in 1937, two months before his sixteenth birthday.  K.P. began his Army career with the 23rd Infantry Division, stationed at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas.  After three years, he transferred to Hawaii and was eventually assigned to the 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks on the north side of Oahu.  On December 7, 1941, K.P. awakened to machine gun fire strafing his building and bullets pouring through the window next to his bunk.  As the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, they also attacked Wheeler Field, located next to Schofield Barracks, which placed K.P. in the midst of the attack.
    Under fire from Japanese planes, K.P. broke into the company arms room to secure machine guns and ammunition, attempting to fire on the Japanese planes.  K.P. remembers the horrible damage inflicted on Pearl Harbor, Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Field and other parts of the island.  ‘Pearl harbor was tore all to pieces,’ he said.  ‘Just horrible.’  
    After the attack on Pearl Harbor, all military forces in Hawaii mobilized, not knowing whether the Japanese would return.  The following year, K.P. deployed to Australia where he served in a variety of roles, including Bomb Disposal School (not one of his favorite assignments).  Eventually, K.P. landed in New Guinea, fighting the Japanese throughout the island.  K.P. returned to Texas just before the war ended and has been a Texas resident ever since (with the exception of a few military deployments).  K.P. married his lovely wife, Lorena, on August 4, 1945, and they have been together ever since, celebrating a momentous 75th anniversary last year.
    K.P. is a very dear friend and an amazing man.  We are honored to share his story.  The just don’t make ‘em like K.P. anymore!
    A special ‘thank you’ to Shreyas Ganesh for volunteering your time as sound engineer for this podcast.  

    • 55 min
    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 21A- Kenneth 'K.P.' Platt Part 1 (Survived the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 21A- Kenneth 'K.P.' Platt Part 1 (Survived the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor)

    We (Walk Among Heroes) are pleased to welcome Kenneth ‘K.P.’ Platt as our guest for Episode 21.  K.P., born and raised in Texas, never graduated high school.  He left school permanently in the seventh grade and joined the Army in 1937, two months before his sixteenth birthday.  K.P. began his Army career with the 23rd Infantry Division, stationed at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas.  After three years, he transferred to Hawaii and was eventually assigned to the 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks on the north side of Oahu.  On December 7, 1941, K.P. awakened to machine gun fire strafing his building and bullets pouring through the window next to his bunk.  As the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, they also attacked Wheeler Field, located next to Schofield Barracks, which placed K.P. in the midst of the attack.
    Under fire from Japanese planes, K.P. broke into the company arms room to secure machine guns and ammunition, attempting to fire on the Japanese planes.  K.P. remembers the horrible damage inflicted on Pearl Harbor, Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Field and other parts of the island.  ‘Pearl harbor was tore all to pieces,’ he said.  ‘Just horrible.’  
    After the attack on Pearl Harbor, all military forces in Hawaii mobilized, not knowing whether the Japanese would return.  The following year, K.P. deployed to Australia where he served in a variety of roles, including Bomb Disposal School (not one of his favorite assignments).  Eventually, K.P. landed in New Guinea, fighting the Japanese throughout the island.  K.P. returned to Texas just before the war ended and has been a Texas resident ever since (with the exception of a few military deployments).  K.P. married his lovely wife, Lorena, on August 4, 1945, and they have been together ever since, celebrating a momentous 75th anniversary last year.
    K.P. is a very dear friend and an amazing man.  We are honored to share his story.  The just don’t make ‘em like K.P. anymore!
    A special ‘thank you’ to Shreyas Ganesh for volunteering your time as sound engineer for this podcast.  

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20C: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 3 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20C: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 3 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

    Don’t miss the conclusion of our three-part series with World War II Medal of Honor recipient Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams.  In this episode, we resume our conversation on the eve of the invasion of Iwo Jima.  Woody takes us through the invasion, his actions on February 23, 1945, and a few other stories from those incredibly difficult days on Iwo Jima.  Woody closes the interview with his advice to our youth today, and also discusses his love for horses.  Following our interview with Woody, continue listening as we interview Woody’s grandson and CEO of the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation, Chad Graham.  Chad tells us about the incredible work they’re doing, as well as few priceless stories about Woody.  
     A true legend, Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams served in the Marine Corps, 3rd Division,  21st Regiment, in the Pacific Theater during World War II.  Mr. Williams is one of only two living recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor (our nation’s highest military award) from World War II (the other is Mr. Charles H. Coolidge – a truly amazing man who was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Europe).  Woody earned his Medal of Honor for actions on February 23, 1945, during the invasion of Iwo Jima.  In an unbelievable span of several hours, Woody utilized a flame thrower to neutralize a network of concrete-reinforced Japanese pillboxes, under extremely heavy fire, after the majority of his company had been killed or wounded.  His actions in the face of ruthless enemy resistance allowed his company to reach its’ objective and ultimately secure one of the airfields on Iwo Jima.  
     Although Woody’s heroic actions on February 23, 1945, will never be paralleled or forgotten, he has never stopped serving our great nation.  Woody grew up on a dairy farm in Quiet Dell, West Virginia.  Like many young men growing up during the Great Depression, he lived a very simple life, and didn’t know (or care) much about what was happening in the rest of the world.  That is, until December 7, 1941.  After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Woody embarked on a long journey of service that still continues today.  
     After joining the Marine Corps, and setting sail for the South Pacific, Woody landed in New Caledonia and was assigned to the 3rd Marine Division.  He experienced his first combat in Guam, and several months later, boarded a ship to invade Iwo Jima.  Following his career in the Marine Corps, Woody served 33 years in the VA, and in 2010 founded the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation (http://www.hwwmohf.org/), an organization dedicated to honoring Gold Star Families.  
     Gold Star families have lost loved ones to military service, and Woody has dedicated his life to honoring them.  At age 97, Woody works tirelessly, day-in and day-out, to honor these families through the building of monuments.  At the time of this writing, Woody’s foundation has constructed 76 Gold Star Monuments, in all 50 U.S. states, with 74 additional monuments in-progress, and more being added each day.  We are currently working on building a monument in downtown San Antonio, Texas, to honor Gold Star families in Central and South Texas.  Candy and Ed Martin, parents of 1LT Tom Martin (who made the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq in October 2007) are working closely with Woody and his foundation to ensure an incredible monument is constructed to honor Tom, and all Gold Star families in South/Central Texas.  
     Whether you spotted Woody visiting with the President on Air Force One this past September, or saw him on national television tossing the coin for Super Bowel LII, you can be sure of one thing:  Woody has more energy at 97 than most people half his age.  I am proud to share his story during this three-part interview

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20B: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 2 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20B: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 2 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

     We (Walk Among Heroes) would like to welcome an amazing man as our twentieth guest.  A true legend, Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams served in the Marine Corps, 3rd Division,  21st Regiment, in the Pacific Theater during World War II.  Part two of our three-part interview series discusses Woody's deployment to the South Pacific, assignment to 3rd Marine Division, combat in Guam, and preparation for the invasion of Iwo Jima.  

    Mr. Williams is one of only two living recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor (our nation’s highest military award) from World War II (the other is Mr. Charles H. Coolidge – a truly amazing man who was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Europe).  Woody earned his Medal of Honor for actions on February 23, 1945, during the invasion of Iwo Jima.  In an unbelievable span of several hours, Woody utilized a flame thrower to neutralize a network of concrete-reinforced Japanese pillboxes, under extremely heavy fire, after the majority of his company had been killed or wounded.  His actions in the face of ruthless enemy resistance allowed his company to reach its’ objective and ultimately secure one of the airfields on Iwo Jima.  
     Although Woody’s heroic actions on February 23, 1945, will never be paralleled or forgotten, he has never stopped serving our great nation.  Woody grew up on a dairy farm in Quiet Dell, West Virginia.  Like many young men growing up during the Great Depression, he lived a very simple life, and didn’t know (or care) much about what was happening in the rest of the world.  That is, until December 7, 1941.  After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Woody embarked on a long journey of service that still continues today.  
     After joining the Marine Corps, and setting sail for the South Pacific, Woody landed in New Caledonia and was assigned to the 3rd Marine Division.  He experienced his first combat in Guam, and several months later, boarded a ship to invade Iwo Jima.  Following his career in the Marine Corps, Woody served 33 years in the VA, and in 2010 founded the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation (http://www.hwwmohf.org/), an organization dedicated to honoring Gold Star Families.  
     Gold Star families have lost loved ones to military service, and Woody has dedicated his life to honoring them.  At age 97, Woody works tirelessly, day-in and day-out, to honor these families through the building of monuments.  At the time of this writing, Woody’s foundation has constructed 76 Gold Star Monuments, in all 50 U.S. states, with 74 additional monuments in-progress, and more being added each day.  We are currently working on building a monument in downtown San Antonio, Texas, to honor Gold Star families in Central and South Texas.  Candy and Ed Martin, parents of 1LT Tom Martin (who made the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq in October 2007) are working closely with Woody and his foundation to ensure an incredible monument is constructed to honor Tom, and all Gold Star families in South/Central Texas.  
     Whether you spotted Woody visiting with the President on Air Force One this past September, or saw him on national television tossing the coin for Super Bowel LII, you can be sure of one thing:  Woody has more energy at 97 than most people half his age.  I am proud to share his story during this three-part interview series.  Part one will discuss Woody’s upbringing and joining the Marine Corps.  Part two will cover his deployment to the South Pacific, combat in Guam, and preparation for Iwo Jima.  In part three, we’ll discuss his actions on February 23, 1945, as well as Woody’s love for horses and advice to young men and women just joining the military.  By the way, part two includes a fascinating description of the flame thrower and how it operate

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20A: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 1 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

    Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 20A: Hershel 'Woody' Williams Part 1 (US Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Recipient)

    We (Walk Among Heroes) would like to welcome a truly amazing man as our twentieth guest.  A true legend, Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams served in the Marine Corps, 3rd Division,  21st Regiment, in the Pacific Theater during World War II.  Mr. Williams is one of only two living recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor (our nation’s highest military award) from World War II (the other is Mr. Charles H. Coolidge – a truly amazing man who was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Europe).  Woody earned his Medal of Honor for actions on February 23, 1945, during the invasion of Iwo Jima.  In an unbelievable span of several hours, Woody utilized a flame thrower to neutralize a network of concrete-reinforced Japanese pillboxes, under extremely heavy fire, after the majority of his company had been killed or wounded.  His actions in the face of ruthless enemy resistance allowed his company to reach its’ objective and ultimately secure one of the airfields on Iwo Jima.  
     Although Woody’s heroic actions on February 23, 1945, will never be paralleled or forgotten, he has never stopped serving our great nation.  Woody grew up on a dairy farm in Quiet Dell, West Virginia.  Like many young men growing up during the Great Depression, he lived a very simple life, and didn’t know (or care) much about what was happening in the rest of the world.  That is, until December 7, 1941.  After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Woody embarked on a long journey of service that still continues today.  
     After joining the Marine Corps, and setting sail for the South Pacific, Woody landed in New Caledonia and was assigned to the 3rd Marine Division.  He experienced his first combat in Guam, and several months later, boarded a ship to invade Iwo Jima.  Following his career in the Marine Corps, Woody served 33 years in the VA, and in 2010 founded the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation (http://www.hwwmohf.org/), an organization dedicated to honoring Gold Star Families.  
     Gold Star families have lost loved ones to military service, and Woody has dedicated his life to honoring them.  At age 97, Woody works tirelessly, day-in and day-out, to honor these families through the building of monuments.  At the time of this writing, Woody’s foundation has constructed 76 Gold Star Monuments, in all 50 U.S. states, with 74 additional monuments in-progress, and more being added each day.  We are currently working on building a monument in downtown San Antonio, Texas, to honor Gold Star families in Central and South Texas.  Candy and Ed Martin, parents of 1LT Tom Martin (who made the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq in October 2007) are working closely with Woody and his foundation to ensure an incredible monument is constructed to honor Tom, and all Gold Star families in South/Central Texas.  
     Whether you spotted Woody visiting with the President on Air Force One this past September, or saw him on national television tossing the coin for Super Bowel LII, you can be sure of one thing:  Woody has more energy at 97 than most people half his age.  I am proud to share his story during this three-part interview series.  Part one will discuss Woody’s upbringing and joining the Marine Corps.  Part two will cover his deployment to the South Pacific, combat in Guam, and preparation for Iwo Jima.  In part three, we’ll discuss his actions on February 23, 1945, as well as Woody’s love for horses and advice to young men and women just joining the military.  By the way, part two includes a fascinating description of the flame thrower and how it operates.  Amazing!
     Woody is an incredible man with an even more incredible story.  He is an inspiration to so many, and I’m honored to call him my friend.  Thank you for listening and sharing

    • 1 hr 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

MarcusSewart2345 ,

My favorite podcast

Regardless of whether you are a history buff, you NEED to hear these stories. They are truly national treasures.

04/27 ,

Episode 5A

I have listened to all the Episodes, and Episode 5A was one of my favorites. It was very interesting hearing about Mr. Clanton growing up during the Depression. All the stories are amazing, and Jeff Wells does an outstanding job of presenting them. I hope everyone enjoys them as much as I did, and I look forward to future weeks!

JWells_23 ,

Episode 1

Fred Harvey...wow! What an amazing man. His stories are incredible!

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