72 episodes

Warm Regards is a podcast about life on a warming planet. The show is hosted by Jacquelyn Gill, a paleoecologist at the University of Maine, and Ramesh Laungani, a biologist at Doane University. Produced by Justin Schell, with transcription and social media support from Joe Stormer and Katherine Peinhardt. Our conversations are often honest and raw, as we talk with newsmakers, researchers, activists, policymakers, artists, and others as we push past the graphs and the headlines to get at the heart of what it means to live and work in a warming world. Our current season focuses on the often unexpected human stories behind climate data, from how it's collected to what we do with it. We're just as much a podcast about what it means to be human as we are about climate change--how we think, decide, love, grieve, change our behavior, and roll up our sleeves to tackle our toughest challenges.

Warm Regards Warm Regards Podcast

    • Science
    • 4.7 • 128 Ratings

Warm Regards is a podcast about life on a warming planet. The show is hosted by Jacquelyn Gill, a paleoecologist at the University of Maine, and Ramesh Laungani, a biologist at Doane University. Produced by Justin Schell, with transcription and social media support from Joe Stormer and Katherine Peinhardt. Our conversations are often honest and raw, as we talk with newsmakers, researchers, activists, policymakers, artists, and others as we push past the graphs and the headlines to get at the heart of what it means to live and work in a warming world. Our current season focuses on the often unexpected human stories behind climate data, from how it's collected to what we do with it. We're just as much a podcast about what it means to be human as we are about climate change--how we think, decide, love, grieve, change our behavior, and roll up our sleeves to tackle our toughest challenges.

    Building our Climate Futures Through Storytelling (Pt. 2), w/Kendra Pierre-Louis and Mary Heglar

    Building our Climate Futures Through Storytelling (Pt. 2), w/Kendra Pierre-Louis and Mary Heglar

    In the finale to our season on climate data, we continue our exploration of storytelling as a way to imagine and build climate futures. Jacquelyn and Ramesh first speak with climate reporter and podcaster Kendra Pierre-Louis about science fiction, representation, and her own shift from writing apocalyptic stories to working on the solutions-focused podcast How to Save a Podcast. Next, they speak with Mary Heglar, co-creator and co-host of the Hot Take newsletter and podcast (along with Amy Westervelt), about the authors and works that influenced how she saw her role in a warming world, including Octavia Butler, James Baldwin, and more, as well as the importance of grappling with climate grief and the historical injustices that have given rise to the consequences of climate change, both now and in the future.

    You can find a transcript of this episode on our Medium page:
    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/building-our-climate-futures-through-storytelling-pt-2-w-kendra-pierre-louis-and-mary-heglar-dff39a779957

    Kendra Pierre-Louis

    Her personal website:
    https://www.kendrawrites.com/

    Follower Kendra on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/KendraWrites

    A republished version of her essay about Wakanda and climate change:
    https://time.com/5889324/movies-climate-change/

    All We Can Save:
    https://www.allwecansave.earth


    Subscribe to How to Save a Planet:
    https://gimletmedia.com/shows/howtosaveaplanet

    Mary Heglar

    Follow Mary on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/MaryHeglar

    Listen to Hot Take and subscribe to their newsletter:
    https://www.criticalfrequency.org/hot-take

    Climate Change Isn’t the First Existential Threat
    https://zora.medium.com/sorry-yall-but-climate-change-ain-t-the-first-existential-threat-b3c999267aa0

    Feel Something, Learn Something, Do Something: A Care Package for Climate Grief
    https://medium.com/@maryheglar/feel-something-learn-something-do-something-a-care-package-for-climate-grief-394cc83933d2

    Climate and the Personal Essay — A Reading List
    https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2020/02/11/climate-personal-essay-reading-list/

    The big lie we’re told about climate change is that it’s our own fault:
    https://www.vox.com/first-person/2018/10/11/17963772/climate-change-global-warming-natural-disasters

    Octavia Butler

    Parable of the Sower:
    https://app.thestorygraph.com/books/70962fbf-178f-40f5-882d-510a9f46c70e

    Official website of the Octavia Butler Estate:
    https://www.octaviabutler.com

    The Octavia Butler Legacy Network:
    http://octaviabutlerlegacy.com

    The Expanse & Climate Change

    https://io9.gizmodo.com/if-you-care-about-earth-you-should-watch-the-expanse-1836708366

    The Day After Tomorrow & Climate Awareness

    https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2014/11/the-long-melt-the-lingering-influence-of-the-day-after-tomorrow/

    https://climatecommunication.yale.edu/publications/before-and-after-the-day-after-tomorrow/

    Katharine Hayhoe: the most important thing we can do about climate change is talk about it:
    https://www.ted.com/talks/katharine_hayhoe_the_most_important_thing_you_can_do_to_fight_climate_change_talk_about_it?language=en

    Eric Holthaus: On Being a Climate Person:
    https://thecorrespondent.com/98/on-being-a-climate-person/12973890622-af2e1b83

    You can subscribe to Sustain 267 here or wherever you get your podcasts:
    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/sustain267-podcast/id1512446379

    Please consider becoming a patron on Patreon to help us pay our producer, Justin Schell, our transcriber, Jo Stormer, and our social media coordinator, Katherine Peinhardt, who are all working as volunteers. Your support helps us not only to stay sustainable, but also to grow.
    www.patreon.com/warmregards

    Find Warm Regards on the web and on social media:

    Web: www.WarmRegardsPodcast.com
    Twitter: @ourwarmregards
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/WarmRegardsPodcast

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Building our Climate Futures Through Storytelling (Part 1), w/Eric Holthaus + Kim Stanley Robinson

    Building our Climate Futures Through Storytelling (Part 1), w/Eric Holthaus + Kim Stanley Robinson

    In the first episode of our two-part finale of our season on climate data, we’re going to focus on fiction, not facts: specifically, on the world-building, future-crafting writers who tell stories to warn us, teach us, inspire us, and motivate us to work for the future of our choosing. In speaking with authors Eric Holthaus and Kim Stanley Robinson, they discuss how hope, empathy, and, of course, climate science and climate data, informed their most recent work, Eric’s The Future Earth and Kim Stanley Robinson’s The Ministry for the Future.

    You can find a link to a full transcript of this episode on our Medium page:

    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/building-our-climate-futures-through-storytelling-part-1-feat-5b2a8077e4b1

    You can follow Eric Holthaus on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/EricHolthaus

    You can read more about and purchase his book, The Future Earth, here: https://bookshop.org/books/the-future-earth-a-radical-vision-for-what-s-possible-in-the-age-of-warming/9780062883162

    Finally, you can subscribe to Eric’s newsletter, The Phoenix, here:
    https://thephoenix.substack.com

    Kim Stanley (Stan) Robinson:

    You can read more about and purchase his book, The Ministry for the Future, here: https://bookshop.org/books/the-ministry-for-the-future/9780316300131

    A comprehensive, though unofficial, website dedicated to Stan’s work:
    http://www.kimstanleyrobinson.info

    On the power of speculative and science fiction:

    ‘We’ve already survived an apocalypse’: Indigenous writers are changing Sci-Fi: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/14/books/indigenous-native-american-sci-fi-horror.html

    Afrofuturism, Africanfuturism, and the language of Black speculative literature: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/afrofuturism-africanfuturism-and-the-language-of-black-speculative-literature/



    On climate fiction:

    Climate fiction: Can books save the planet? https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/08/climate-fiction-margaret-atwood-literature/400112/

    The influence of climate fiction: an empirical survey of readers: https://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article/10/2/473/136689/The-Influence-of-Climate-FictionAn-Empirical

    The rise of apocalyptic novels: https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20210108-the-rise-of-apocalyptic-novels

    With the world on fire, climate fiction no longer looks like a fantasy: https://grist.org/climate/with-the-world-on-fire-climate-fiction-no-longer-looks-like-fantasy/

    Amy Brady’s “Burning Worlds” column for the Chicago Review of Books:

    https://chireviewofbooks.com/category/burning-worlds/

    On futurology:

    Smithsonian will celebrate 175 years with an exhibit about the future: https://www.npr.org/2021/03/01/972409626/smithsonian-will-celebrate-175-years-with-an-exhibit-about-the-future

    10 ways science fiction predicted the future: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/live-lessons/10-ways-science-fiction-predicted-future/z6dynrd

    Please consider becoming a patron on Patreon to help us pay our producer, Justin Schell, our transcriber, Jo Stormer, and our social media coordinator, Katherine Peinhardt, who are all working as volunteers. Your support helps us not only to stay sustainable, but also to grow.
    www.patreon.com/warmregards

    Find Warm Regards on the web and on social media:

    Web: www.WarmRegardsPodcast.com
    Twitter: @ourwarmregards
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/WarmRegardsPodcast

    • 53 min
    Indigenous Climate Knowledges and Data Sovereignty

    Indigenous Climate Knowledges and Data Sovereignty

    In this episode of Warm Regards, we talk to two Indigenous scientists about traditional ecological knowledges and their relationship with climate and environmental data. In talking with James Rattling Leaf, Sr. and Krystal Tsosie, Jacquelyn and Ramesh discuss how these ideas can challenge Western notions of relationality and ownership, how they have been subject to the long history of extraction and exploitation of Indigenous communities (practices which continue today), but also how Indigenous scientists and activists link sovereignty over data created by and for Indigenous people to larger sovereignty demands.

    You can find a transcript of this episode on our Medium page:
    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/indigenous-climate-knowledges-and-data-sovereignty-4fc756b9476e

    James Rattling Leaf, Sr.
    North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center
    https://nccasc.colorado.edu

    Rising Voices:
    https://risingvoices.ucar.edu

    GEO Indigenous Alliance
    https://earthobservations.org/indigenoussummit2020.php

    Oceti Sakowin
    http://aktalakota.stjo.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8309
    https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/plains-belonging-nation/oceti-sakowin

    Tribal Climate Leaders Program:
    https://cires.colorado.edu/news/tribal-climate-leaders-program

    Krystal Tsosie

    You can follow her on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/kstsosie

    Native BioData Consortium
    https://nativebio.org

    United States Indigenous Data Sovereignty Network
    https://usindigenousdata.org

    CARE Principle for Indigenous Data Governance
    https://datascience.codata.org/articles/10.5334/dsj-2020-043/

    Finally, you can listen to Good Fire at their website or wherever you get your podcasts:
    https://yourforestpodcast.com/good-fire-podcast

    Further reading:

    Several of Kyle Whyte’s papers informed out team’s understanding as we prepared this episode:

    Indigenous Climate Change Studies: Indigenous Futures, Decolonizing the Anthropocene
    https://kylewhyte.marcom.cal.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2018/07/IndigenousClimateChangeStudies.pdf

    Indigenous Lessons About Sustainability Are Not Just “For All Humanity”
    https://kylewhyte.marcom.cal.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2018/07/IndigenousInsightsintoSustainabilityarenotforAllHumanity.pdf

    Too late for indigenous climate justice: Ecological and relational tipping points
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/wcc.603

    Dominique M. David-Chavez and Michael C. Gavin, A global assessment of Indigenous community engagement in climate research.
    https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aaf300/meta

    Eve Tuck & Wayne Wang 2012, Decolonization is not a metaphor
    https://clas.osu.edu/sites/clas.osu.edu/files/Tuck%20and%20Yang%202012%20Decolonization%20is%20not%20a%20metaphor.pdf

    For more on how climate change impacts Shishmaref, see Elizabeth Marino’s book, Fierce Climate Sacred Ground:
    https://www.alaska.edu/uapress/browse/detail/index.xml?id=528

    Scott Kalafatis et al., Ensuring climate services serve society: examining tribes’ collaborations with climate scientists using a capability approach:
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-019-02429-2

    Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals
    http://www7.nau.edu/itep/main

    This Teen Vogue article is a nice introduction to land acknowledgements
    https://www.teenvogue.com/story/indigenous-land-acknowledgement-explained

    For more on the Land Back movement:
    https://landback.org/

    This Flash Forward episode (with lots of links for further reading)
    https://www.flashforwardpod.com/2020/11/10/land-back/

    The 2Land2Furious project by the Métis in Space podcast creators
    https://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/back-2-the-land-2land-2furious
    http://www.metisinspace.com

    Jacquelyn would especially like to thank Katherine Crocker, who has deeply influenced her own thinking about Indigenous sovereignty and ethical partnerships. Check out her essay, C

    • 1 hr 28 min
    Adapting and Moving in a Warming World, with Beth Gibbons and Dr. Jola Ajibade

    Adapting and Moving in a Warming World, with Beth Gibbons and Dr. Jola Ajibade

    This episode of Warm Regards focuses on two more facets of decision making based on data about how the climate is changing. We first talk to Beth Gibbons, the Executive Director of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals. Beth talks to us about the different ways that people working in the field of climate adaptation use climate data to plan for present and future climate conditions, including the different consequences of climate change (sea level rise, water shortages, stronger storms, and more). We also discuss how adaptation efforts can respond to and work to alleviate historical inequalities that make climate change worse for marginalized communities. Next, Jacquelyn and Ramesh talk with Dr. Jola Ajibade, an Assistant Professor of Geography at Portland State University. Dr. Ajibade’s work looks at not just the importance of how we talk about different forms of climate migration (such as planned retreat, managed retreat, and others) but also how it has taken different forms around the world, with uneven levels of success and equity for the individuals and communities moving due to climate change.

    You can find a transcript of this episode on our Medium page:
    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/adapting-and-moving-in-a-warming-world-with-elizabeth-gibbons-and-dr-jola-ajibade-f889dbffcbd1

    What is climate adaptation, and how has it been neglected?
    https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2019/12/what-is-climate-change-adaptation-and-why-does-it-matter/

    For more on how adaptation has been neglected:
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/apr/10/adaptation-is-the-poor-cousin-of-climate-change-policy

    Adaptation isn’t surrender, it’s survival:
    https://www.wired.com/story/climate-adaptation-isnt-surrender-its-survival/

    What is climate resilience?
    https://www.c2es.org/site/assets/uploads/2019/04/what-is-climate-resilience.pdf

    The case for managed retreat:
    https://www.politico.com/news/agenda/2020/07/14/climate-change-managed-retreat-341753

    Equitable retreat: the need for fairness in coastal communities:
    https://e360.yale.edu/features/equitable-retreat-the-need-for-fairness-in-relocating-coastal-communities

    Climate migration on NHPR’s Outside/In Radio:
    http://outsideinradio.org/shows/climate-migration

    Beth Gibbons is the Executive DIrector of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals.
    https://adaptationprofessionals.org

    You can follow Beth on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/ehgibb?lang=en

    You can also follow ASAP on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/adaptpros

    Jola Ajibade is an Assistant Professor of Geography at Portland State University.

    You can learn more about her work at her website:
    https://sites.google.com/pdx.edu/idowu-ajibade/about

    And follow her on Twitter:
    @JolaAdapts

    Please consider becoming a patron on Patreon to help us pay our producer, Justin Schell, our transcriber, Joe Stormer, and our social media coordinator, Katherine Peinhardt, who are all working as volunteers. Your support helps us not only to stay sustainable, but also to grow.

    www.patreon.com/warmregards

    Find Warm Regards on the web and on social media:
    Web: www.WarmRegardsPodcast.com
    Twitter: @ourwarmregards
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/WarmRegardsPodcast

    • 1 hr 31 min
    Environmental Justice and Climate Justice, with Dr. Sacoby Wilson and Dr. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò

    Environmental Justice and Climate Justice, with Dr. Sacoby Wilson and Dr. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò

    This episode of Warm Regards focuses on the intersections, but also the disconnects, between environmental justice and climate justice movements. First, Jacquelyn and Ramesh talk with Dr. Sacoby Wilson about his work with communities throughout the United States who are facing the consequences of environmental racism, and his beliefs that scientists’ publications are not enough to enact meaningful change for communities struggling with environmental injustice. We then shift to a more global frame, speaking with Dr. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò on climate colonialism, and how climate change is inextricably linked with the histories of colonialism, and how we can avoid continuing that legacy in a warming future.

    To view a transcript of this episode, see our Medium page:
    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/environmental-justice-and-climate-justice-with-dr-sacoby-wilson-and-dr-dr-ol%C3%BAf%E1%BA%B9%CC%81mi-o-t%C3%A1%C3%ADw%C3%B2-4c9ac0a8587d

    Show Notes
    Environmental justice factsheet from the University of Michigan:
    http://css.umich.edu/factsheets/environmental-justice-factsheet

    World Resources Institute report on the largest emitters:
    https://www.wri.org/blog/2014/11/6-graphs-explain-world-s-top-10-emitters

    Why climate change is an environmental justice issue:
    https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2020/09/22/climate-change-environmental-justice/

    What is climate justice?
    https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2020/07/what-is-climate-justice/

    Climate change is also a racial justice problem:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-solutions/2020/06/29/climate-change-racism/

    The US is the richest country in the world, with the largest wealth gap:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/23/business/united-states-is-the-richest-country-in-the-world-and-it-has-the-biggest-wealth-gap.html

    For more about how the response to Hurricane Katrina caused gentrification in New Orleans:
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-12/new-orleans-gentrification-tied-to-hurricane-katrina

    We still don’t know how many people died in Hurricane Katrina:
    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/we-still-dont-know-how-many-people-died-because-of-katrina/

    Don’t repeat the mistakes of the Katrina recovery:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/14/opinion/hurricane-katrina-irma-harvey.html

    For more about how communities of color are marginalized in terms of solar power:
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/solar-powers-benefits-dont-shine-equally-on-everyone/

    To read more about Dr. Sacoby WIlson’s work, visit his University of Maryland website:
    https://sph.umd.edu/people/sacoby-wilson

    Dr. Wilson directs the Community Engagement, Environmental Justice and Health Lab
    https://sph.umd.edu/laboratory-resources/community-engagement-environmental-justice-and-health-ceejh

    The Lab can also be found on Medium and Twitter:
    https://ceejhlab.medium.com
    https://twitter.com/ceejhlab

    Fumes Across the Fenceline
    https://www.naacp.org/climate-justice-resources/fumes-across-fence-line/

    Coal Blooded
    https://www.naacp.org/climate-justice-resources/coal-blooded/

    Toxic Waste and Race (1987)
    https://www.nrc.gov/docs/ML1310/ML13109A339.pdf

    Toxic Waste and Race at Twenty
    https://www.ucc.org/environmental-ministries/environmental-ministries_toxic-waste-20/

    Yessenia Funes's story on Earther
    https://earther.gizmodo.com/im-scared-study-links-cancer-alley-air-pollution-to-hi-1843484042

    To learn more about Dr. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò and his work, see his website:
    http://www.olufemiotaiwo.com

    You can also follow him on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/OlufemiOTaiwo

    Selected publications by Dr. Táíwò:
    https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/10/case-for-climate-reparations-crisis-migration-refugees-inequality/

    https://theconversation.com/how-a-green-new-deal-could-exploit-developing-countries-111726

    “The Great Climate Migration,” an article by ProPublica and the New York Times,

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Historical and Volunteer Climate Data, with Cary Mock and Theresa Crimmins

    Historical and Volunteer Climate Data, with Cary Mock and Theresa Crimmins

    This episode of Warm Regards continues our exploration of the often unexpected stories behind climate data. First we explore historical climatology records with Dr. Cary Mock. These are the measurements and observations of things like wind, pressure, rainfall, and more found in archives and historical societies around the world. Then, we turn to the present and talk with Dr. Theresa Crimmins, Director of the National Phenology Network, about how volunteers can contribute their own climatological and ecological observations. In doing so, they can better understand not only how climate change is affecting their immediate environment, but also assist in large-scale climate change research.

    For a transcript of this episode, visit our Medium page:
    https://ourwarmregards.medium.com/historical-and-volunteer-climate-data-with-cary-mock-and-theresa-crimmins-a4f7f7370f23

    Show Notes
    For more on the weather of The Long Winter and the work of meterologist Barbara Mayes Boustead, check out this Boing Boing article by Maggie Koerth:

    https://boingboing.net/2012/12/11/the-meteorology-of-little-hous.html

    You can also check out Barbara’s series of recorded presentations about the weather of the Little House books:

    http://www.bousteadhill.net/lauraslongwinter/

    This essay on the Little House books and the “myth of white self-sufficiency” explores the ways that the authors’ political agendas heavily influenced the series:

    https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/in-promoting-the-myth-of-white-self-sufficiency-the-little-house-books-rewrite-history/16545/?fbclid=IwAR3xRlBjiHUuqFoOxC71MqyCl-BRCmSI1z3AuA1mgf40uDrNWWh-1kYk-yM

    To learn more about the Schoolhouse Blizzard and its influence on weather forecasting, check out the following:

    David Laskin’s book, The Children’s Blizzard

    https://bookshop.org/books/the-children-s-blizzard/9780060520762

    This interactive website by the National Weather Service (complete with historical accounts):

    https://noaa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=3b68adee4e9545b7abdd7355ab7fe367

    To learn more (including some neat photos of historical documents) about the ‘Year Without a Summer,’ check out this website from the Massachusetts Historical Society:

    https://www.masshist.org/beehiveblog/2016/11/1815-the-year-without-a-summer/

    You can learn more about Dr. Mock’s historical climatology work, including photos of the kinds of documents he works with, at his website:

    http://artsandsciences.sc.edu/geog/research/climatelab/historical/historical.html

    You can also follow him on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/cary_mock?lang=en

    Here are some other community and citizen science projects mentioned in the episode that you can get involved in:

    Zooniverse: https://www.zooniverse.org
    SciStarter: https://scistarter.org
    CoCoRHAS: https://www.cocorahs.org
    ISeeChange: https://www.iseechange.org

    Visit the National Phenology Network's website to learn more about the organization's history and current projects:

    https://www.usanpn.org

    Explore the data visualization tool mentioned in the episode:
    https://www.usanpn.org/data/visualizations

    To start contributing your own observations through Nature's Notebook, visit the project's website:

    https://www.usanpn.org/natures_notebook

    You can also download the app on the iOS App Store or Google Play:

    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/natures-notebook/id508465801?ls=1
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.usanpn.android.naturesnotebook

    Please consider becoming a patron on Patreon to help us pay our producer, Justin Schell, our transcriber, Joe Stormer, and our social media coordinator, Katherine Peinhardt, who are all working as volunteers. Your support helps us not only to stay sustainable, but also to grow.

    https://www.patreon.com/warmregards

    Find Warm Regards on the web and on social media:
    Web: www.WarmRegardsPodcast.com
    Twitter:

    • 1 hr 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
128 Ratings

128 Ratings

Jack Shoegazer ,

Warm Regards is the Radiolab of climate podcasts.

This is a very smart podcast with a huge heart, reminding us that science is done for and by humans.

Schleyer ,

Excellent insights by climate scientists

This is a uniquely helpful podcast in that it is hosted by climate scientists and rooted in hard data, but offers insights on a broad range of related issues, including the nature of the work of climate scientists and the broader implications of their work.

Sarah Jaquette Ray ,

Great podcast

I’m learning more from this podcast than I have in a long time. Thanks for taking a look at unusual angles!

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