37 episodes

To further the conversation about the value and complexity of rivers, American Rivers launched our podcast series, “We are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us.”

“We Are Rivers” takes it’s listeners on a journey to tell the stories of rivers and the important relationship they have with us. It explores the culture and history of the west and our nation by talking with adventurers, writers, water experts, and artists about their connection to rivers, and how they impact their lives. The podcast series covers a wide array of topics across the Colorado Basin and other rivers across the country.

American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 250,000 members, supporters and volunteers.

Annemarie Lewis writes and hosts our American Rivers podcast series, "We Are Rivers," while attending college in Colorado Springs. She started making podcasts about water conservation while in high school and plans on, "Living a life full of water conservation advocacy." Her hobbies include backpacking, climbing, river running, and amateur piano playing.

Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.

We Are Rivers Conversations about the rivers that connect us

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 38 Ratings

To further the conversation about the value and complexity of rivers, American Rivers launched our podcast series, “We are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us.”

“We Are Rivers” takes it’s listeners on a journey to tell the stories of rivers and the important relationship they have with us. It explores the culture and history of the west and our nation by talking with adventurers, writers, water experts, and artists about their connection to rivers, and how they impact their lives. The podcast series covers a wide array of topics across the Colorado Basin and other rivers across the country.

American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 250,000 members, supporters and volunteers.

Annemarie Lewis writes and hosts our American Rivers podcast series, "We Are Rivers," while attending college in Colorado Springs. She started making podcasts about water conservation while in high school and plans on, "Living a life full of water conservation advocacy." Her hobbies include backpacking, climbing, river running, and amateur piano playing.

Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.

    Episode 32: The River Is Who We Are - The Waccamaw Indian People and the Waccamaw River

    Episode 32: The River Is Who We Are - The Waccamaw Indian People and the Waccamaw River

    Through displacement, genocide and enslavement, the Waccamaw Indian People sustain their river heritage. Join us today to learn more about the Waccamaw Indian People and their history with the Waccamaw River in coastal South Carolina. For the Waccamaw Indian People, layers of oppression eroded the relationship between people and the river they relied on and that coursed through their history, culture, and being. But the impacts of that displacement don’t just live in the past, and it is essential that the connection the Waccamaw Indian People have with the river is strengthened and reestablished for the future of their communities, and for the future of the Waccamaw River.

    Photo Credit: Cheryl Sievers-Cail and Chief Hatcher of the Waccamaw Indian People, Courtesy of Cheryl Sievers-Cail

    • 28 min
    Episode 31: Transforming a Forgotten Creekside Park - The Little Walnut Creek Greenbelt

    Episode 31: Transforming a Forgotten Creekside Park - The Little Walnut Creek Greenbelt

    Across the country, cities and towns are rallying around forgotten areas of their communities - including rivers, creeks, open spaces and community parks. These areas are being rehabilitated and restored so locals and tourists alike can enjoy the many benefits they provide. In Austin, Texas, community members in East Austin came together to restore a forgotten creekside park - what has become Little Walnut Creek Greenbelt. Join us today to learn about the community driven process to undertake a master plan effort and create a new vision for The Little Walnut Creek Greenbelt.

    Photo Credit: Little Walnut Creek Greenbelt, Gibran Lule-Hurtado

    • 34 min
    Episode 30: Water - We need it, it needs us - Part 2

    Episode 30: Water - We need it, it needs us - Part 2

    In the second of this two-part podcast, we are joined by our partners at the Hispanic Access Foundation for a conversation about the importance of water - including rivers, lakes and oceans – to the Latino community. We dive deeper into stories and personal connections to water from members of the Ocean’s Advisory Committee. While unique, these stories weave through similar themes, and encourage us to further examine the way water links us to place, to home, and to family. Most of all, these inspiring stories remind us how those critical connections to water compel us to fight for its protection.

    Photo Credit: Hispanic Access Foundation

    • 32 min
    Episode 29: Water - We need it, it needs us - Part 1

    Episode 29: Water - We need it, it needs us - Part 1

    Join us for a miniseries of We Are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us. In this two-part conversation we are joined by our partners at the Hispanic Access Foundation for a conversation about the importance of water - including rivers, lakes and oceans – to the Latinx community. The first episode dives into the Hispanic Access Foundations’ work to engage Latino communities in river and ocean conservation, and the role personal connections to water play in inspiring the work of the Foundation. We hear about Latino Conservation Week and the ocean conservation work the Hispanic Access Foundation is spearheading, as well as some great personal stories from members of the Hispanic Access Foundation's Oceans Advisory Council. Tune in today!

    Photo Credit: Vamos A Pescar event in Richmond, Virginia, photo taken by Jessica Godinez, Hispanic Access Foundation

    • 28 min
    Episode 28: We Can Make a Lot Happen When We Have a Plan - Part 2

    Episode 28: We Can Make a Lot Happen When We Have a Plan - Part 2

    Join us for a two-part miniseries of We Are Rivers. We’ll learn more about Colorado's Stream Management Plans, an innovative planning tool prioritized in Colorado’s Water Plan, from people working with stakeholder groups and communities across Colorado to put them in place.

    If you were inspired by the first Episode, make sure to tune in today. In the second episode, we hear from some of the same voices and from new ones from the Rio Grande Basin – including Heather Dutton with the San Luis Valley Water Conservancy District and Emma Reesor with Rio Grande Headwaters Restoration Project – about the groundbreaking and inspiring ways communities are working together to plan for the future of the rivers and streams that bind them, and all of us, together.

    Listen in and join us today!

    Photo Credit: Daniel Boyes, Rio Grande Headwaters Restoration Project

    • 22 min
    Episode 27: We Can Make a Lot Happen When We Have a Plan - Part 1

    Episode 27: We Can Make a Lot Happen When We Have a Plan - Part 1

    Join us for a two-part miniseries of We Are Rivers. We’ll learn more about Colorado's Stream Management Plans, an innovative planning tool prioritized in Colorado’s Water Plan, from people working with stakeholder groups and communities across Colorado to put them in place.

    In the first episode of this miniseries, we hear from Nicole Seltzer, Science and Policy Manager of River Network, who talks us through the fundamentals of the stream management planning process. Holly Loff, Executive Director of Eagle River Watershed Council, shares on-the-ground experiences of a community planning effort along the Eagle River, and Chelsea Congdon-Brundige, a watershed consultant in the Roaring Fork Valley, shares her highlights from a similar but unique effort for the Crystal River.

    Listen in and join us today!

    Photo Credit: Eagle River Watershed Council

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

Baker Casagrande ,

Fantastic Podcast

We Are Rivers is a fantastic podcast that shares the complexities and community behind the rivers that connect us. Highlighting the multi-faceted issues that surround water, the podcast does a great job of teaching both experienced river people and newcomers everything there is to know about river systems. I love how the podcast focuses on both personal action and action from larger organizations, ensuring that there is always someone fighting for our rivers.

presslrj ,

Interesting for everyone

I recently found We Are Rivers after reading Where the Water Goes by David Owens. While I live in Ohio, I still feel a sense of responsibility to understand past, present and future water issues and conservation efforts specific to the desert southwest. Annemarie does a wonderful job of educating the listener about the Colorado River Basin, and explains how we ended up where we are today, along with efforts we need to make to ensure the future sustainability of water in the southwest.

heyswedishfish ,

Binge-listen worthy

Just discovered this podcast and am nearly all the way through all 12 episodes created to date. I enjoy the mix of historical background, politics, personal story, and activism. Though it may lean a little to the conservationist side (which speaks to me), it’s generally unbiased and provides a god comprehensive viewpoint. Would love to learn more about other river basins going through the same struggles.

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