769 episodes

The world as we knew it is undergoing a rapid transformation…so what's next?

Welcome to WorldAffairs, your guide to a changing world. We give you the context you need to navigate across borders and ideologies. Through sound-rich stories and in-depth interviews, we break down what it means to be a global citizen on a hot, crowded planet.

Our hosts, Ray Suarez, Teresa Cotsirilos and Philip Yun help you make sense of an uncertain world, one story at a time.

WorldAffairs World Affairs Council of Northern California

    • News
    • 4.3 • 158 Ratings

The world as we knew it is undergoing a rapid transformation…so what's next?

Welcome to WorldAffairs, your guide to a changing world. We give you the context you need to navigate across borders and ideologies. Through sound-rich stories and in-depth interviews, we break down what it means to be a global citizen on a hot, crowded planet.

Our hosts, Ray Suarez, Teresa Cotsirilos and Philip Yun help you make sense of an uncertain world, one story at a time.

    World as Family

    World as Family

    It's holiday season. And for many of us, that means spending more time—whether in person or virtually—with our loved ones. This week, we revisit an episode from earlier this year that helps us make sense of the isolation brought on by the pandemic, and mistrust sown by our political differences.
     
    Drawing from an ancient Sanskrit phrase, “the world is one family,” author Vishakha Desai challenges us to consider a different way of looking at each other and the world we share. Desai joins co-host Ray Suarez on the podcast to talk about her new book World as Family: A Journey of Multi-rooted Belongings.
     
    Guest:
    Vishakha Desai, Author and Scholar at Columbia University
     
    Hosts:
    Philip Yun, CEO, WorldAffairs
    Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 59 min
    Fiona Hill on Saving Democracy

    Fiona Hill on Saving Democracy

    In the third and final episode of our series on Putin’s Russia, we feature an interview with Fiona Hill. Long before she testified in the first Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump, her life experiences opened her eyes to the conditions which give rise to populist leaders. Coming of age in a coal-mining town during Thatcher-era austerity, Hill observed how a lack of opportunity in working class communities can manifest at the ballot box, with serious consequences for democracy. As the lead Russia expert in Trump’s White House, she watched Vladimir Putin manipulate Trump’s weaknesses and observed in the former president “autocrat envy.” “He was always talking about people like Putin being strong and powerful and making it very clear that's how he saw himself.”
     
    In an interview with Ray Suarez, she spoke about her new memoir, There’s Nothing For You Here, the impact of economic despair on politics, and what needs to change to save democracy. 
     
    Guests:
    Fiona Hill, former Russia advisor in the National Security Council and senior fellow at The Brookings Institution
     
    Hosts:
    Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 59 min
    Bonus Episode: Update from Carmen Carcelén

    Bonus Episode: Update from Carmen Carcelén

    Carmen Carcelén lives in a small town on the Colombia-Ecuador border. One night in 2017, she invited 11 beleaguered Venezuelan migrants into her home for a meal and a decent night's sleep. From there, word of Carmen's shelter spread all the way back to Venezuela. In the past four years, Carmen has fed and sheltered over 10,000 migrants.
    After we ran a story about Carmen in August, listeners reached out and asked how they could help. Thanks to their generous donations, a GoFundMe campaign to support Carmen's "Casa De Paz," has raised more than $2,000. 
    In case you missed the original story, "In Carmen's Hands," you can listen here, with a special update from Carmen explaining how she is using the funds to expand her work. 
    If you want to support Carmen’s shelter, it's not too late to donate to her GoFundMe campaign.

    • 19 min
    From Moscow to Monte Carlo

    From Moscow to Monte Carlo

    The Pandora Papers, a massive data leak connecting individuals to offshore accounts and tax havens, shined a light on the shadow world where celebrities, politicians, dictators and drug traffickers hide their money. In the second installment of our three-part series on Putin’s Russia, investigative journalist Luke Harding explores a trail of documents and properties linked to Vladimir Putin’s inner circle, which show how “Putin and the people around him became fantastically rich, even more rich once he became president.”
     
    Then, we go inside “Putin’s Palace,” a secretive and sprawling luxury complex on the Black Sea allegedly owned by the Russian president. Images of the palace were exposed in a documentary released by Alexei Navalny’s organization, the Anti-Corruption Foundation. But who is Navalny really, and what politics does he embody? For that, we turn to Jan Matti Dollbaum, Morvan Lallouet, and Ben Noble, co-authors of “Navalny: Putin's Nemesis, Russia's Future?”
     
    Guests:
     
    Luke Harding, author and journalist, The Guardian
    Jan Matti Dollbaum, postdoctoral researcher, Bremen University
    Morvan Lallouet, PhD candidate, University of Kent
    Ben Noble, associate professor, University College London
     
    Hosts:
     
    Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 59 min
    In Putin’s Shadow

    In Putin’s Shadow

    It’s been about 30 years since the fall of the Soviet Union, and in many post-Soviet countries, people are still fighting for basic rights. From Belarus to Central Asia, to the Caucasus, to Russia itself, people still struggle under regimes that flout democratic norms. Unresolved border disputes sometimes lead to devastating wars.
    In this episode, we look at democracy movements fighting to survive in the shadow of a Russian government that’s determined to consolidate power. We start in Armenia. This is part of a 3-part series on Putin’s Russia.
    Guests:
    Harout Manougian, elections expert, EVN Report
    Elize Manoukian, associate producer, World Affairs
    Simon Ostrovsky, PBS NewsHour special correspondent
    Arzu Geybulla, journalist and founder of Azerbaijan Internet Watch
    Hosts:
    Teresa Cotsirilos, senior producer and co-host, WorldAffairs
    Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 59 min
    Is the United Nations Still Relevant?

    Is the United Nations Still Relevant?

    When delegates from 50 countries met in San Francisco to sign the UN Charter in 1945, the goal was to maintain peace and security through international cooperation and to prevent another world war. Today’s UN has 193 member countries and is facing a new era of uncertainty.
    As world leaders gather in Glasgow for the United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP26, we revisit an episode we produced last year as the United Nations turned seventy-five. We look at the UN’s achievements, its shortcomings and what the future holds for international cooperation. Ray Suarez talks with author James Traub, Rt. Hon Kim Campbell, former prime minister of Canada, and Jorge Castañeda, former foreign minister of Mexico.
    Guests:
    Jorge Castañeda, former foreign minister of Mexico
    Rt. Hon. Kim Campbell, Canada's 19th prime minister
    James Traub, fellow at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation
    Hosts:
    Ray Suarez, co-host, World Affairs
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
158 Ratings

158 Ratings

Classroomtools ,

Thoughtful, Engaging, Compelling Listens

The programs in this series are absolutely brilliant - moving, engaging and oh so informative. Listening may turn out to be for you, as it has for me, one of the best hours of the week.

craigtreehorn ,

Educational, naturally

This podcast has taught me so much already and I just finished listening to my 3rd episode.

Each episode is filled with stories that are so captivating you can’t help but imagine what it is like to be there with the speakers and see or feel the world through their experiences.

WorldAffairs will teach you something new from the oldest educational device there is, the story.

I can’t wait to hear a new story from the amazing hosts and guests each week. I’m all caught up this week so I’m off to mine their back catalogue and learn some more, naturally.

Nutrition enthusiast ,

Engaging & Informative

A great weekly listen with timely content and interesting interviews from a variety of viewpoints on world political affairs.

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