50 episodes

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

WSJ’s The Future of Everything The Wall Street Journal

    • Technology
    • 4.3 • 1.2K Ratings

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

    The Conservation Conundrum: How Do We Decide Which Species to Save?

    The Conservation Conundrum: How Do We Decide Which Species to Save?

    From “save the whales” to “protect the bumblebee,” animal conservationists rally advocates and officials to put resources toward ensuring the survival of a threatened species. But can we really save them all? Or are we overlooking the trade-offs as we decide which animals are protected to the detriment of others? WSJ’s Danny Lewis speaks to Dr. Rebecca Nesbit, ecologist and author of the book “Tickets for The Ark: From Wasps to Whales – How Do We Choose What to Save?” about the tricky ethical questions behind conservation.

     

    Further Reading:



    A Belgian City Opens a Hotel for an Unusual Clientele: Insects | WSJ 

    Are Shark Attacks a Sign of Conservation Success? | WSJ 

    Bird Populations Plummet in North America | WSJ 

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    • 24 min
    Why Sound Could be Key to the Future of Coral Reefs

    Why Sound Could be Key to the Future of Coral Reefs

    With climate change warming the oceans, coral reefs remain some of the most vulnerable ecosystems. Keeping an eye on them can be time-consuming and expensive, since it requires divers to do spot-checks to see if the reefs are bustling, lively environments or if they are degrading into abandoned neighborhoods. But some researchers are increasingly tuning in to how reefs sound to monitor the corals’ health and maybe even make them more resilient. In this episode of The Future of Everything, WSJ’s Danny Lewis explores how listening to reefs may be the next frontier in trying to save them.

     

    Further reading:



    Financing a Healthy Future for Coral Reefs 

    Listen: Scientists Are Recording Ocean Sounds to Spot New Species 

    Divers Discover Coral Reef in Pristine Condition 

    Google AI Tries to Save the Whales 

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    • 20 min
    AI, Art and the Future of Looking at a Painting

    AI, Art and the Future of Looking at a Painting

    Three controversial paintings by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt were lost to a fire in WWII. All that remained were black and white photos - and art historians have discussed what the paintings’ motifs and colors actually looked like for decades. Recently, the Google Arts and Culture Lab gave it a try ... by tapping into artificial intelligence. In this episode of the Future of Everything, WSJ's Ariana Aspuru explores how researchers are using AI to better understand art, artists and the creative process.

     

    Further reading:

    The Klimt Color Enigma — Google Arts & Culture 

    ‘Klimt vs. Klimt: The Man of Contradictions’ Review: Exploring an Art-Nouveau Master Online - WSJ  

    Using AI to recreate how artists painted their masterpieces | MIT CSAIL 



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    • 24 min
    How Gene-Edited Crops Could be the Future of Feeding the World

    How Gene-Edited Crops Could be the Future of Feeding the World

    In the decade since CRISPR gene-editing technology was first developed, it has been used to address a host of issues, such as developing new cancer treatments, designing faster rapid COVID-19 tests and to make biofuel-producing algae. Proponents say CRISPR could also help solve some of the world’s biggest food-related problems: salad greens could be more nutritious, fruits could taste better, and crops of all kinds could be altered to grow using fewer resources. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently gave the go-ahead to bring gene-edited beef to market, and CRISPR-modified purple tomatoes could be coming later this year. But agricultural technology companies still have to figure out how to overcome consumer skepticism. In this session from the WSJ Global Food Forum, leaders from two firms working to scale-up gene-edited foods discuss what it takes to get the new technology out of the lab and into supermarkets.



    Further reading:

     

    Get Ready for Gene-Edited Food 

    GMO Tomatoes Could Be Returning After 25 Years. Will People Eat Them? 

    Crispr’s Next Frontier: Treating Common Conditions 



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    • 22 min
    Making “Organic Architecture” Truly Organic

    Making “Organic Architecture” Truly Organic

    Neri Oxman spends her time thinking about the future of materials science and how it should influence architecture and design. In this session from the Future of Everything Festival, the architect and former tenured professor at MIT’s Media Lab speaks with WSJ Health and Science coverage chief Stefanie Ilgenfritz about her vision of a future where science, technology and organic design work together to create products and buildings that may counteract climate change in urban areas. 



    Further reading:

    A Science of Buildings That Can Grow—and Melt Away | WSJ 

    JPMorgan’s New Manhattan Headquarters to Be All Electric Powered | WSJ 

    Biophilic Design Is Helping Big-City Apartment Towers Get Back to Nature | WSJ 

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    • 20 min
    Fertility and the Future of Health

    Fertility and the Future of Health

    Welcoming a child into your family can be life changing, but for those struggling to get pregnant the process can be emotionally taxing and expensive. Reproductive science is quickly changing, as is society’s approach to the issues around fertility. In this episode, we bring you a conversation from the WSJ Future of Everything Festival, where a handful of medical practitioners and reproductive entrepreneurs discussed the future of fertility with WSJ’s Amy Dockser Marcus. Guests include: sociologist Rene Almeling, Stephen Krawetz, the Associate Director of the CS Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Daisy Robinton, the CEO of Oviva Therapeutics and Angela Stepancic, the founder of Reproductive Village Cryobank. This conversation was recorded before the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe v. Wade.



    Useful Links:

    See more videos from The WSJ Future of Everything Festival  

    GUYnecology: The Missing Science of Men’s Reproductive Health 

    Krawetz Lab at the C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development

    Oviva Therapeutics 

    Reproductive Village Cryobank 



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    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

groovecanon ,

Great Podcast

Wonderfully produced. Great topics. High fiving a million angels 🙌

littlest cowboy ,

This pod used to be good

Your guest on bio whatever didn’t even know how to explain what she’s doing. Bunch of gobblety goop

Marcus517 ,

What happened to the WSJ

This has to be a separate group from WSJ. Both light weight and biased.

The recent Rosetta Stone article talked about how the recent decoding of the entire human genome (filling in the 8% that was missing) was groundbreaking and would change our understanding of diseases. However, the only evidence was essentially the person who did the work saying it was groundbreaking and would change our .... If "felt" like Dr Eichler and his team did a lot of hard work over something that didn't matter all that much and was deparate to make it sound important. Just give me some facts next time and you'll have me.

The recent "As we work" episode was embarassing. All about the unfairness of the wage gap to women, minorities, etc. Zero from the studies which showed where, in large part, this comes from. At least for women, it's that they choose or are forced in some way to take the less intense job. So, take the town lawyer job at 30 hours per week vs. the corporate 60 hour a week one. You can argue against what I said, but at least mention that this data is out there. And the host must know about this, or is incompetent.

The last thing we need is another NPR podcast. I'm done.

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