1,394 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.7 • 3 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    ‘Kids Are Dying. How Are These Sites Still Allowed?’

    ‘Kids Are Dying. How Are These Sites Still Allowed?’

    This episode contains details about suicide deaths and strong language.

    A few years ago, a website about suicide appeared. On it, not only do people talk about wanting to die, but they share, at great length, how they are going to do it.

    Times reporters were able to identify 45 people who killed themselves after spending time on the site, several of whom were minors. The true number is likely to be higher.

    We go inside the Times investigation into the website, and ask how and why it is still allowed to operate.

    If you are having thoughts of suicide or are concerned that someone you know may be having those thoughts, in the United States call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 (TALK) or go to SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for a list of additional resources. Go here for resources outside the United States.

    Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Gabriel J.X. Dance, deputy investigations editor for The Times.

    • 33 min
    Why Ukraine Matters to Vladimir Putin

    Why Ukraine Matters to Vladimir Putin

    The Russian military is on the move toward the border with Ukraine, with American intelligence suggesting that Moscow is preparing for an offensive involving some 175,000 troops.

    Could the moves herald a full-scale invasion? And if so, what is driving President Vladimir V. Putin’s brinkmanship over Russia’s southwestern neighbor?

    Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.

    • 26 min
    A New Strategy for Prosecuting School Shootings

    A New Strategy for Prosecuting School Shootings

    Last week, after a shooting at Oxford High School in the suburbs of Detroit that left four teenagers dead, local prosecutors decided on a novel legal strategy that would extend criminal culpability beyond the 15-year-old accused of carrying out the attack. But could that strategy become a national model?

    Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 23 min
    The Trial of Ghislaine Maxwell

    The Trial of Ghislaine Maxwell

    This episode contains descriptions of self-harm and alleged sexual abuse.

    When Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide in a federal jail, dozens of his alleged victims lost their chance to bring him to justice.

    But the trial of his associate, Ghislaine Maxwell, on charges that she recruited, groomed and ultimately helped Mr. Epstein abuse young girls, may offer an opportunity to obtain a degree of reckoning.

    We look into how Mr. Epstein was allowed to die, and ask whether justice is still possible for his accusers.

    Guest: Benjamin Weiser, a reporter covering the Manhattan federal courts for The New York Times.

    • 32 min
    The Sunday Read: ‘The Emily Ratajkowski You’ll Never See’

    The Sunday Read: ‘The Emily Ratajkowski You’ll Never See’

    In her book, “My Body,” Emily Ratajkowski reflects on her fraught relationship with the huge number of photographs of her body that have come to define her life and career.

    Some essays recount the author’s hustle as a young model who often found herself in troubling situations with powerful men; another is written as a long, venomous reply to an email from a photographer who has bragged of discovering her. Throughout, Ratajkowski is hoping to set the record straight: She is neither victim nor stooge, neither a cynical collaborator in the male agenda, as her critics have argued, nor some pop-feminist empoweree, as she herself once supposed.

    • 37 min
    The Life and Legacy of Stephen Sondheim

    The Life and Legacy of Stephen Sondheim

    Stephen Sondheim died last week at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 91.

    For six decades, Mr. Sondheim, a composer-lyricist whose works include “Sweeney Todd” and “Into the Woods,” transformed musical theater into an art form as rich, complex and contradictory as life itself.

    “For me, the loss that we see pouring out of Twitter right now and everywhere you look as people write about their memories of Sondheim is for that person who says yes, devoting yourself to writing or to dancing or to singing or to composing — or whatever it is — is a worthwhile life,” Jesse Green, The Times’s chief theater critic, said in today’s episode. “And there really is no one who says that as strongly in his life and in his work as Sondheim does.”

    Today, we chart Mr. Sondheim’s career, influence and legacy.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Top Podcasts In News

You Might Also Like

More by The New York Times