40 episodes

Snake Rescue with Nick Evans is an adrenalin-fuelled podcast series which follows Nick on his exciting snake rescue adventures in the Greater Durban area. As you'll hear, Durban is home to some of the most dangerous snakes in the world. With a population of over 3.5 million people, and many snakes around, human/snake conflict is a common occurrence, and snakes end up being found in some strange places! It's Nick's job to safely remove these misunderstood animals. There are always challenges and risks involved though. To be part of Nick’s adventures, listen to this podcast.

Snake Rescue East Coast Radio

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 30 Ratings

Snake Rescue with Nick Evans is an adrenalin-fuelled podcast series which follows Nick on his exciting snake rescue adventures in the Greater Durban area. As you'll hear, Durban is home to some of the most dangerous snakes in the world. With a population of over 3.5 million people, and many snakes around, human/snake conflict is a common occurrence, and snakes end up being found in some strange places! It's Nick's job to safely remove these misunderstood animals. There are always challenges and risks involved though. To be part of Nick’s adventures, listen to this podcast.

    Nick Evans, a power tool and an elusive Forest Cobra

    Nick Evans, a power tool and an elusive Forest Cobra

    This was a really exciting call out for Nick Evans because it was for a snake he hadn't caught in years - a Forest Cobra!

    "This snake really played hard to get, and it took a few trips to actually catch it. On one of those trips, we worked for ages, doing proper manual labour. It all paid off in the end!" recalls Nick.

    * More from Nick: Forest Cobras are a beautiful snake species found on the KZN North Coast, and become more and more common further north. So not a snake we see around Durban. And unlike our Durban cobra (the Mozambique Spitting Cobra), Forest Cobras do not spit. Nice for the likes of me! They have an interesting, two-toned color appearance. The front half is a yellowish-brown color, and it darkens towards the tail end. The tail end is pitch black. They have a shiny appearance. Like all of our cobras, they are highly venomous. They can also hood up, impressively, too. But if given half a chance, they'll flee, not wanting confrontation.

    You can sleep lekker now': Nick to the rescue in Bellair

    You can sleep lekker now': Nick to the rescue in Bellair

    Snake Rescue's Nick Evans received a call from the Bellair area of Durban, and he could hear some panic in the background. There was apparently a really big Black Mamba in a shrub between two properties. "When I arrived, this snake decided to make my life difficult - it went into the roof of the one property- a high roof at that!" recalls Nick.
    "Luckily, the residents were very helpful, and we also had many eyes scanning to see if the mamba came out. Still, as you will hear, that didn't make it any easier! My heart was thumping during this!"
    Listen to Nick's Bellair adventure below.

    • 9 min
    Nick Evans to the rescue as hungry mamba sniffs out pet birds

    Nick Evans to the rescue as hungry mamba sniffs out pet birds

    Black Mambas do enjoy a bird or two for lunch. When this mamba sniffed out caged parakeets, it couldn't resist popping in for a meal. However, it all went wrong for the snake. Not only did it not catch a meal, but it managed to get itself stuck! This was quite a challenging and stressful rescue for Nick Evans!

    *Multiple birds were kept in multiple properties bordering a valley (mamba habitat). A mamba visitor was inevitable. Please don't panic if you have a pet bird, especially if you do not live on a property bordering a reserve or valley, as the chance of a mamba coming for it is slim.

    • 7 min
    Puff Adder ventures into KZN factory

    Puff Adder ventures into KZN factory

    In the latest Snake Rescue podcast, Nick Evans is called back to a factory at Cato Ridge, outside Durban, where he’s been for a snake rescue before. Previously, Nick was called out there in the early hours of one morning to capture a decent sized python. On this particular day though, there was a different kind of snake - a highly venomous one at that - a Puff Adder!

    "It had ventured indoors and into a place where the snake could bump into humans, with an unpleasant outcome for both potential parties," says Nick Evans.

    Puff Adders have a potent cytotoxic venom, which causes tissue damage and pain, so avoiding a bite from one is ideal.

    "They bite a number of people throughout Africa each year, not intentionally. These are ambush predators. They lie in wait for their prey to come past.

    "Unfortunately, because even small mammals use our pathways, these snakes occasionally lie on or next to pathways. This is when a bite can occur," says Nick.

    Needless to say, he needed to remove it, for everyone's safety.

    Listen to the details in the latest Snake Rescue podcast below.

    • 5 min
    Green Mamba at Sibaya construction site

    Green Mamba at Sibaya construction site

    In fairly recent times, Snake Rescue’s Nick Evans has been called out twice to the same construction site in the Sibaya area of the KZN North Coast, to remove Green Mambas, both on scaffolding. “As completion of the development neared, I figured that's it for the Green Mamba calls from there. Well, I was wrong, and a third was in store for me,” says Nick.

    Green Mambas are generally restricted to the KZN coastline, in the lush, coastal forests, seldom venturing further inland. However, their habitat is constantly being destroyed, and so with fewer spaces to live in, they often end up in weird places, like this!

    “Green Mambas are highly venomous, with a mostly neurotoxic venom (affecting the nervous system). They are shy snakes, which are not often seen due to their arboreal (tree-dwelling) habits,” says Nick.

    “I am so grateful the staff at this construction site had a call rather than kill policy! I think they've completed their building now, so now there should be no more mamba excitement with them, much to my disappointment!”

    • 4 min
    Nick Evans and the mystery of the missing hamster

    Nick Evans and the mystery of the missing hamster

    Hamsters are cute little pets. However, snakes don't see them that way. To some snakes, hamsters are a very tasty snack. In the latest Snake Rescue podcast, with Nick Evans, he deals with a case where a black mamba picked up the scent of a pet hamster, and moved in.
    "A young man had been 'hamster-sitting' his little sister's pet while she was away. You can imagine the shock and horror he experienced when he went to check on it, and found a black mamba in the hamster cage, with a bulge in the middle, and no hamster.
    How does he explain that to his sister? Awkward," says Nick. Listen to the details here.

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
30 Ratings

30 Ratings

fjdosne ,

Entertaining!

I enjoy seeing the photos and listening to the podcasts. When are you going to film your captures? That’d be great

lynleycl ,

Our own KZN snake hero

It’s a relief to have such a knowledgeable, competent and experienced snake catcher in our city. He helps so many people and educates all about snakes

drthorn_V ,

True Conservation

Nick’s passion for conservation shines through in his work and his willingness to help whether he is paid or not. He is relentless in his drive to educate people about animals in the knowledge that we fear things we don’t understand and his work will undoubtedly save lives on both sides.

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