117 episodes

Hackaday Editors take a look at all of the interesting uses of technology that pop up on the internet each week. Topics cover a wide range like bending consumer electronics to your will, designing circuit boards, building robots, writing software, 3D printing interesting objects, and using machine tools. Get your fix of geeky goodness from new episodes every Friday morning.

Hackaday Podcast Hackaday

    • Technology

Hackaday Editors take a look at all of the interesting uses of technology that pop up on the internet each week. Topics cover a wide range like bending consumer electronics to your will, designing circuit boards, building robots, writing software, 3D printing interesting objects, and using machine tools. Get your fix of geeky goodness from new episodes every Friday morning.

    Three DIY Lab Instruments, Two Tickers, and a MicroCar

    Three DIY Lab Instruments, Two Tickers, and a MicroCar

    Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys select our favorite hardware hacks of the past week. This episode is packed with DIY lab instruments, including a laser microscope, a Raspberry Pi spectrometer, and a stepper motor tester that can tell you what's going on all the way down to the microsteps. We wax poetic about what modular hardware really means, fall in love with a couple of stock-ticker robots, and chat with special guest Tom Nardi about his experience at the VCF Swap Meet.

    • 48 min
    AI is Bad at Linux Terminal, Puppeting Pico in Python, 3D Scanning Comes Up Short

    AI is Bad at Linux Terminal, Puppeting Pico in Python, 3D Scanning Comes Up Short

    Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams pull back the curtain on a week of excellent hacks. We saw an awesome use of RGB LEDs as a data channel on a drone, and the secrets of an IP camera's OS laid bare with some neat reverse engineering tools. There's an AI for the Linux terminal that guesses at the commands you actually want to run. We jump into a look at the gotchas you'll find when working with models of 3D scanned objects.

    • 45 min
    Eye is Watching You, Alien Art, CNC Chainsaw, and the Galvie Flu

    Eye is Watching You, Alien Art, CNC Chainsaw, and the Galvie Flu

    Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys marvel at the hacks that surfaced over the past week. An eye-popping webcam hack gives that camera above your screen an eyeball to look around, an eyelid to blink with, and the skin, eyelashes, and eyebrow to complete the illusion (and make us shudder at the same time).

    Dan did a deep dive on the Zinc Flu -- something to avoid when welding.. A robot arm was given a chainsaw, and we suffered the headache of path planning such a machine.

    • 44 min
    Python Switching to Match, a Magnetic Dyno, a Flying Dino, and a Spinning Sequencer

    Python Switching to Match, a Magnetic Dyno, a Flying Dino, and a Spinning Sequencer

    Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams recap a week of great hacks. You won't want to miss the dynamometer Leo Fernekes built to measure the power output of his Sterling engine. It's also nice to step back and appreciate a hand-built rubberband-powered ornithopter.

    We talk about Python's addition of the match statement (not be be confused with switch statements). And when it comes to electromechanical synth gear, it's hard to beat a spinning tape-head sequencer.

    • 52 min
    We Have an NFT, Racing a Mobius Strip, and Syncing Video with OpenCV and Blender

    We Have an NFT, Racing a Mobius Strip, and Syncing Video with OpenCV and Blender

    Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys celebrate clever projects from the week that was. There was some April fooling that was not a hack, but other features this week are world-class hacks, such as the 555 timer built from 1.5-dozen vacuum tubes, and the mechanical word-clock built around PCB coils by Hackaday's own [Mortiz v. Sivers]. [Linus Akesson] aka [lft] shows off a Commodore64 that sounds as big as a cathedral organ. [Matthew Earl] puts video of the Mars landing on satellite photos.

    • 52 min
    3D Graphics are Ultrasonic, Labotomizing Alexa, 3D-Printing Leaky Rockets, and Gaming the Font System

    3D Graphics are Ultrasonic, Labotomizing Alexa, 3D-Printing Leaky Rockets, and Gaming the Font System

    Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams curate a week of great hacks. You can make a 3D display with 200 ultrasonic transducers, four FPGAs, and a lot math. Smart speakers are hackable if you just roll your own firmware. Hobby servos can be awful, but this week we saw they can be made really great by cracking open the DC motor to add a simple DIY position sensor. And lasers are making their way into car headlights; we illuminate the situation in this episode.

    • 49 min

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