100 episodes

Welcome to the Emerging Minds podcasts. Listen to conversations with experts on a variety of topics related to children's social and emotional wellbeing.

Our episodes offer insightful evidence-informed wisdom from experts in the field and will give you a flavour of the work and values of the National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health.

Stay tuned for new episodes released every fortnight.

Emerging Minds Podcast Emerging Minds

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 40 Ratings

Welcome to the Emerging Minds podcasts. Listen to conversations with experts on a variety of topics related to children's social and emotional wellbeing.

Our episodes offer insightful evidence-informed wisdom from experts in the field and will give you a flavour of the work and values of the National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health.

Stay tuned for new episodes released every fortnight.

    Homelessness and child mental health

    Homelessness and child mental health

    This podcast explores the topic of homelessness and its impacts on children and families – in particular, how it affects child mental health. Most importantly, it provides workable strategies and skills for improving support to families experiencing homelessness.

    In this episode, we talk with Susie Lukis and Kirren O'Brien, Coordinators for the Statewide Children’s Resource Program in Victoria. The Statewide Children’s Resource Program (SCRP) advocates for and assists practitioners in homelessness support and other non-government services to respond more effectively to the needs of children who have experienced homelessness and/or family violence.

    This episode is full of strategies that services can adopt to better support children and families experiencing homelessness. It outlines practical skills that practitioners can use in their work with children and their caregivers who are experiencing homelessness. It also looks at how families become homeless in the first place, and what impact issues such as COVID-19, cost of living rises, natural disasters and housing affordability have had on Australian families.

     



     

    In this episode you will learn:

    the different pathways to homelessness and how societal issues impact on children and families (4:09)
    how infant and child mental health is impacted when family and domestic violence drives families into homelessness (10:38)
    the importance of early intervention and other strategies to help services better support the child mental health in the context of homelessness (16:48)
    practical skills for engaging and supporting the mental health of children experiencing homelessness and the parent-child relationship (23:14)

     

    Further information and resources:

    Website: Statewide Children’s Resource Program

    Website: Statewide Childrens Resource Program – resources for practitioners

    Webinar: Families and homelessness: Supporting parents and improving outcomes for children

    Online course: Intergenerational mental health

    Online course: The impact of trauma on the child

    Online course: Supporting children who have experienced trauma

    Podcast: Breaking the cycle of intergenerational disadvantage

    In focus article: What are adverse childhood experiences ACEs)?

    • 41 min
    How holistic pregnancy care promotes infant mental health

    How holistic pregnancy care promotes infant mental health

    Children and young people’s healthy development is directly related to the nature and quality of the parenting they receive. The National Action Plan for the Health of Children and Young People 2020–2030 highlights that effective parenting support improves both immediate and long-term child outcomes, especially during the antenatal and early childhood period. But due to discrimination, psychosocial/language barriers, poor continuity of care and a lack of accessible, affordable, quality health services, many parents find it hard to get the support they need.

    In this episode, Vicki Mansfield talks with Dr Lyndal Harborne, an obstetrician and gynecologist. Dr Harborne’s professional and personal experiences of motherhood have led her to become a compassionate advocate for holistic pregnancy care. She has learned that the provision of holistic care throughout pregnancy benefits both parent and infant mental health.

    Dr Harborne talks about why it’s important for clinicians to take the time to understand parents’ psychosocial context. She explores how providing parents with choices can enable them to positively navigate pregnancy, birth and the transition to parenting. She shares her insights about post-natal depression, and advocates for talking about the ‘bad stuff’ so parents don’t feel alone and abandoned in their experiences.

     



     

    In this episode you will learn:

    the importance of having antenatal care that explores and understands the parent’s ‘bigger picture’ – not just their physical state, but also their emotional and mental health and their relationships with others [08:17]
    why understanding perinatal vulnerabilities and having a multidisciplinary team is essential to best support the emotional wellbeing of parents [19:20]
    the benefits of compassionately exploring the pressures parents feel in adjusting to parenting, and how these pressures impact upon parents’ moods and feelings about having children [20:43]
    the importance of supporting parents after perinatal loss, and how miscarriages, stillbirths, neonatal deaths and other losses can leave parents feeling isolated and alone [24:35]

     

    Further information and resources:

    Keeping the infant and toddler in mind (online course)
    Healing the Past by Nurturing the Future: Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families (online course)

    • 21 min
    Supporting children who disclose trauma - part two

    Supporting children who disclose trauma - part two

    David Tully is the Practice Manager at Relationships Australia, South Australia. He has 25 years of experience working with children and families who’ve been impacted by sexual abuse and physical trauma. 

    In the second episode of this two-part series (part one here), David talks about the role of therapy in helping children to develop and understand their identity in the context of trauma or abuse. He describes the importance of helping children to discover new identities, built from their stories of protest, resistance and resilience. These identities help counteract the stories of failure that so many children carry with them after experiences of trauma or abuse.  

    David describes some of the labels that are often given to children who have experienced trauma, and how therapy can help to dispute these labels. He discusses interventions that provide children with the context they need to challenge their negative identities and self-blame. He also shares some insights from his work with men who perpetrate violence, and his work with children who have been affected by men’s violence. 



    In this episode you will learn:  

    how to help children incorporate their stories into a contextual framework that acknowledges power (3:36) 
    ways to work with men who perpetrate violence that focus on what their child is seeing, hearing and experiencing (8:08) 
    the importance of understanding the relational context of trauma (12:00) 
    why it’s important to honour the significance of children’s stories of protest and resilience (14:22) 
    the important messages David provides to practitioners who

    • 20 min
    Supporting children who disclose trauma - part one

    Supporting children who disclose trauma - part one

    David Tully has been a therapist, supervisor and manager for 25 years. In his role as Practice Manager at Relationships Australia SA, he uses trauma-informed care principles to support children and families affected by sexual abuse and physical trauma.  

    In the first episode of this two-part series, David talks about how children make meaning of their experiences of trauma and sexual abuse, and how perpetrators can manipulate children into believing they were complicit in the abuse. He discusses the practitioner’s role in bringing power and protest into focus, in ways that begin to challenge children’s feelings of shame and self-blame. And he describes how being curious about the small acts of resistance that children demonstrate throughout traumatic experiences can help to honor their resilience, connections and courage.  

    David unpacks the ways in which secrecy operates in the lives of children who’ve experienced trauma and abuse, and how practitioners can help children access new understandings of their experiences. He provides some practical examples of ways to engage with children in your work, to increase the likelihood that your sessions are purposeful and useful and can support children’s recovery.

     



     

    In this episode you will learn:  

    why it’s important to understand the ways in which children make meaning of their experiences of trauma and abuse [03:17]

    how David helps provide children with an overt context of power [10:17]

    the importance of establishing purpose from the earliest possible stage of engagement [15:50]

    how David makes his foundational beliefs about the unfairness of abuse clear in his early conversations with children [19:26]

    how to include more generative account

    • 24 min
    Responding to complex developmental trauma

    Responding to complex developmental trauma

    Complex developmental trauma can affect children’s lives in many ways. It can have an impact on development and may lead to poor long-term outcomes if not addressed. These impacts also present many challenges for parents and caregivers, as well as practitioners.

    Effective trauma-informed practice requires a comprehensive understanding of the signs and effects of complex developmental trauma. Practitioners also need to have the skills and confidence to have protective conversations with children and their families.

    In this episode, we talk with Kathryn Lenton of the Australian Childhood Foundation about working with children and families who are living with the impacts of complex developmental trauma. Kathryn draws on her extensive clinical experience as a social worker and counsellor to discuss key understandings and practices for effective trauma-informed practice.

     



     

    In this episode you will learn:

    what complex developmental trauma is and how it may manifest in children’s lives [01:18]
    key understandings that can support practitioners [06:00]
    strategies for working effectively with parents and caregivers [09:41]
    how to differentiate between the impacts of complex trauma and medical diagnoses [18:15]
    ways to respond to children’s experience of shame [22:01]

     

    Further information and resources:

    What is meant by PACE? https://ddpnetwork.org/about-ddp/meant-pace/

    PACE and the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP) model: https://ddpnetwork.org/about-ddp/

    Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy training: https://professionals.childhood.org.au/training-development/ddp/

    The impact of trauma on the child (online course): https://emergingminds.com.au/resources/trauma-and-the-child-e-learning-course/

    Supporting children who have experienced trauma (online course): https://emergingminds.com.au/resources/supporting-children-who-have-experienced-trauma-e-learning-course/

    Supporting children who disclose trauma (online course): https://emergingminds.com.au/online-course/supporting-children-who-disclose-trauma/

    How to recognise complex trauma in infants and children and promote wellbeing (webinar): https://emergingminds.com.au/resources/recognising-complex-trauma-in-infants-and-children/

    Complex trauma through a trauma-informed lens: Supporting the wellbeing of infants and young children (practice paper): https://emergingminds.com.au/resources/complex-trauma-through-a-trauma-informed-lens-supporting-the-wellbeing-of-infants-and-young-children/

    Working and walking alongside First Nations children and young people – a practical guide for non-Aboriginal workers (practice paper):

    • 25 min
    Mental health support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families

    Mental health support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families

    Note: ‘Social and emotional wellbeing’ is the foundation for physical and mental health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It is a holistic concept which results from a network of relationships between individuals, family, kin and Community. It also recognises the importance of connection to Land, culture, spirituality and ancestry, and how these affect the individual.

    Building the cultural capacity of an organisation is an important step in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination and wellbeing. In this episode, Lou Turner and Nancy Jeffrey discuss how they’ll be guiding Emerging Minds’ partnerships and implementation work to better support the mental health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

    Lou Turner is a proud Anangu father with Pitjantjatjara connections to Docker River and Mutitjulu communities. Lou shares his hopes for his work with Emerging Minds; and discusses the journey of ‘walking in two worlds’ to promote and realise intergenerational healing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families, and the generations to come.

    You’ll also hear from Nancy Jeffrey, a proud Woolwonga woman from the Northern Territory who lives and works on Larrakia Country. Nancy shares her passion for supporting the social and emotional wellbeing  of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families, and the cultural protocols that have helped her work in rural and remote communities. Nancy has a long history in supporting infants and children’s mental health and the work of Emerging Minds – she has been a member of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing National Consultancy group since it began in 2019.

    In this episode, Nancy and Lou share the hopes and worries they have for their First Nations communities. They also outline steps and strategies that non-Indigenous practitioners can use to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families’ mental health and wellbeing.



    In this episode you will learn:

    why it’s important to understand the impact of colonisation and how intergenerational trauma plays out in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities [07:21]
    how mental health impacts and interacts with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander concepts of social and emotional wellbeing [11:56]
    the importance of understanding ‘double stories’ when supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families [15:10]
    practical steps you can take to build confidence in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families [16:24]

    Further information and resources:

    A story of two-way learning and healing (podcast)

    In focus: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (article)

    Improving the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (online course)

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
40 Ratings

40 Ratings

lakynxxxxxxx ,

Couldn’t rate highly enough

This is an amazing podcast, so insightful and readily accessible for a new graduate social worker- please never stop uploading podcasts they are invaluable!!!! Especially with people coming to speak from their relative specialisations and fields of practice. Thank you !

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Hugh van Cuylenburg, Ryan Shelton & Josh van Cuylenburg
LiSTNR
Alexis Fernandez
Aubrey Gordon & Michael Hobbes
Scicomm Media
Jay Shetty

You Might Also Like

Hugh van Cuylenburg, Ryan Shelton & Josh van Cuylenburg
ABC Radio
ABC Radio
Mamamia Podcasts
Chat 10 Looks 3
ABC Radio