13 episodes

He was born Hamish Watson, a surfie dude from Sydney - but he could morph into whatever you needed him to be. Hamish is due to be sentenced to jail in early 2019 for swindling a handful of victims out of more than $7m. But these crimes are just the final pages in a resume too thick to staple; for decades he's duped victims in the US, Canada, Britain, Hong Kong and Australia. How did he do it? How did he evade authorities around the world for so long and what's he done with all those tens of millions of dollars he stole?

Who the Hell is Hamish? The Australian

    • News
    • 4.6, 3.4K Ratings

He was born Hamish Watson, a surfie dude from Sydney - but he could morph into whatever you needed him to be. Hamish is due to be sentenced to jail in early 2019 for swindling a handful of victims out of more than $7m. But these crimes are just the final pages in a resume too thick to staple; for decades he's duped victims in the US, Canada, Britain, Hong Kong and Australia. How did he do it? How did he evade authorities around the world for so long and what's he done with all those tens of millions of dollars he stole?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
3.4K Ratings

3.4K Ratings

Emma Mary Robertson ,

Confronting, intriguing & fascinating.

I finished this off in about two days as it is highly addictive, beautifully crafted and full of the kind of stories that will make your stomach churn as this is the report of a truly evil man who over a period of decades did unspeakable things to honest people as a conman of almost mythic proportions. Highly recommended.

ickleash ,

Compelling

Janes interview was very emotional. She was so brave and honest. I didn’t like the intrusive probing when she was emotional. I thought the interviewer was insensitive, when Jane already felt shame and guilt when discussing certain events. Otherwise a good, well researched podcast unfolding the many layers of deception and lies created by Hamish Watson

BensMichelle ,

Overdramatic but bearable, until...

For the most part, I was able to get past the host’s strained timbre and propensity for ending an interviewee’s sentences with sensational conclusions. Sure, these people invested to get rich quick, but they were also victims of fraud and deserved my sympathy. There was a distinct lack of emphasis on how “Jane” wasn’t just a victim of a conman, but of a sexual predator and -by nature of her being too young to give consent- a rapist. Sadly, these flaws are par for the course in podcasting.

Then came episode 7, with “experts” providing analysis of the podcast’s subject without having access to a full forensic exam, history, or interviews with people who know him other than his victims. One such interviewee claims Hamish is without doubt a sociopath or psychopath, while simultaneously saying he can’t speak to Hamish’s behaviour as he hasn’t performed an exam. Another “expert” -an alleged professor in the field- frequently uses the word “crimogenic” when he should be saying criminogenic. This is an essential word in forensic behaviour and criminology studies, and is learned within the first week of any tertiary education in the area. A professor should know how to say it, especially if going on a podcast to “educate” the public.

Ultimately, this podcast is beating a dead horse. It’s going nowhere narratively speaking, and in terms of quality, it’s going downhill fast.

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The Australian