97 episodes

Engaging the brightest minds working to solve one of the world's toughest challenges—child abuse. Join us for conversations with leading experts on science, law, medicine, morality, and messaging. One in Ten is brought to you by National Children's Alliance, the largest network of care centers in the U.S. serving child victims of abuse. Our host is Teresa Huizar, NCA's CEO and a national expert on child abuse intervention and trauma treatment. Visit us online at nationalchildrensalliance.org.

One in Ten National Children's Alliance

    • Science

Engaging the brightest minds working to solve one of the world's toughest challenges—child abuse. Join us for conversations with leading experts on science, law, medicine, morality, and messaging. One in Ten is brought to you by National Children's Alliance, the largest network of care centers in the U.S. serving child victims of abuse. Our host is Teresa Huizar, NCA's CEO and a national expert on child abuse intervention and trauma treatment. Visit us online at nationalchildrensalliance.org.

    Making Prevention Education Accessible for All

    Making Prevention Education Accessible for All

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities are more than three times more likely to experience abuse and neglect than children without these disabilities. We should see a prevention landscape filled with programs tailored to these children. Yet, as Dr. Melissa Bright from the Center for Violence Prevention Research tells us, few such programs exist, and even fewer have been researched for their effectiveness. Why does so little research exist on this uniquely vulnerable population? For child abuse professionals, how might we create or adapt prevention programs for these children? And how do we approach parents and caregivers who may have questions or concerns about prevention programming for their child? Take a listen.
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (01:35)Unique vulnerabilities (04:35)Why so few prevention programs? (07:41)Focus groups (11:05)State-required prevention education (20:56)Advice for child abuse professionals (25:42)You’re not innovating if it doesn’t work (29:10)Public policy implications (37:37)For more information (40:06)Links:
    Melissa Bright, Ph.D., founder and executive director of the Center for Violence Prevention Research
    “Parents’ and professionals perspectives on school-based maltreatment prevention education for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities,” Csenge B. Bődi, Diana P. Ortega, LouAnne B. Hawkins, Tyler G. James, Melissa A. Bright, Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 145, 2023, 106428, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2023.106428
    Erin’s Law
    Jenna’s Law
     For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 40 min
    A Sea of Red Dots: The Explosion in Online Child Sexual Abuse

    A Sea of Red Dots: The Explosion in Online Child Sexual Abuse

    While the presence of child sexual abuse images in child sexual abuse cases is not new, the sheer scale and scope and ubiquity of it all is. The exponential growth in the trading of these images has created a sophisticated marketplace designed around exploiting children. Three guests join us today to discuss child sexual abuse materials online (CSAM): Elizabeth and Ted Cross and Stefan Turkheimer. 
    What Liz and Ted set out to learn was the degree to which incest played into the production of this material, what types of sex acts those trading in CSAM were most interested in, and what ages were most common among the child victims. It’s terribly disturbing but also important for us to understand in order to properly combat it.  
    We speak with Stefan about important policy implications. What can policy makers do to hold tech companies more responsible for preventing the proliferation of these materials? And how do we leverage the resources needed to serve victims? Please take a listen.
    Topics in this episode:
    The scope of the problem (2:06)A sea of red dots (4:16)Research design (12:35)Findings (20:41)Severity of abuse (24:03)The link with incest (28:45)Public policy (30:25)Implications for practice (38:29)For more information (41:25)Links:
    Elizabeth Cross, Ph.D., Cross Associates Research & Evaluation Services, LLC, and adjunct professor of social work and child advocacy at Montclair State University
    Theodore Cross, Ph.D., senior research specialist – research professor, Children and Family Research Center at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    Stefan Turkheimer, vice president for public policy, RAINN
    NCMEC CyberTipline
    Child Rescue Coalition 
    Map and severity of abuse list from a presentation by Cross, Cross, Cooper, Turkheimer, and Bailey to the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Congress
    Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC)
    Camille Cooper
    Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act
    EARN IT Act
    Project Safe Childhood Act
    Child Rescue Act
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 41 min
    Why Do People Believe Conspiracy Theories About Human Trafficking?

    Why Do People Believe Conspiracy Theories About Human Trafficking?

    The rise in myths and conspiracy theories about human trafficking have been one of the most frustrating parts of being a child abuse professional over the past few years. It has been a deadly game of whack a mole, because as soon as one myth or conspiracy theory is debunked, yet another arises.
    Dr. Maureen Kenny, a professor of psychology at Florida International University, set out to explore why and how these conspiracy theories were endorsed by a diverse college population in hopes that this would give us insight into better education strategies for the wider public. If you have ever moaned and groaned your way through a media report with whackadoodle ideas about trafficking or rolled your eyes at a movie that depicted it all wrong, this episode is for you. Please take a listen.
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (1:55)What is human trafficking? (3:01)Why the uptick in myths and conspiracy theories? (5:06)Why we want to believe (13:13)Language choices (16:42)What kids need to know (18:49)Surprising findings (22:41)The scale of misinformation (24:41)Influencing the influencers (26:15)Future research (31:27)Advice for child abuse professionals (37:40)One bright note (38:50)For more information (40:10)Links:
    Maureen C. Kenny, Ph.D., professor, associate chair Academic Personnel and Diversity, Florida International University
    “Conspiracy Theories of Human Trafficking: Knowledge and Perceptions Among a Diverse College Population,” Maureen C. Kenny, Claire Helpingstine, and Tracy Borelus (2023), Journal of Human Trafficking, DOI: 10.1080/23322705.2023.2225367
    The study Teresa mentions: “‘Influencing the Influencers:’ A Field Experimental Approach to Promoting Effective Mental Health Communication on TikTok,” Matt Motta, Yuning Liu, and Amanda Yarnell (2023); there are multiple news stories about the study, including a recent NPR article by Andrea Muraskin (January 5, 2024)
    Dr. Kenny suggests these websites to learn more about myths and facts of human trafficking:
    Polaris Project U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Trafficking In Persons, OUT OF THE SHADOWS: Exposing the Myths of Human Trafficking (hhs.gov) National Human Trafficking Hotline: Myths & Facts 
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 40 min
    Understanding Kids With Problematic Sexual Behaviors

    Understanding Kids With Problematic Sexual Behaviors

    Geoff Sidoli joins us from NCA’s Institute for Better Mental Health Outcomes to talk about kids with sexual behavior problems. Myths abound about why these kids act out, how treatable they are, and what treatment settings and methods may be most helpful. But research shows that these kids are treatable. So how do we set these kids on a better life trajectory and improve safety at home and in the community?
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (1:43)Risk factors (4:15)A range of behaviors (9:09)Myths and blind spots (12:18)Effective treatments (22:31)Research gaps (30:13)For more information (40:20) Links:
    Geoff Sidoli, MSW, LCSW, coordinator of mental health programs, NCA Institute for Better Mental Health Outcomes
    Problematic sexual behaviors
    Patrick Lussier, Ph.D.
    James R. Worling, Ph.D., C.Psych.
    “20-year prospective follow-up study of specialized treatment for adolescents who offended sexually”
    “An Empirically-Based Approach for Prosecuting Juvenile Sex Crimes,” Paul Stern, JD
    “Impressions of child advocacy center leaders: How problematic sexual behavior in children and adolescents is perceived by community professionals”
    Jane Silovsky, Ph.D., appeared in Season 3, “Sexual Behavior in Youth: What’s Normal? What’s Not? And What Can We Do About It?”
    “Quantifying the Decline in Juvenile Sexual Recidivism Rates,” Michael F. Caldwell, PsyD
    Brian Allen, PsyD; the phase-based treatment model
    Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)
    Melissa D. Grady
    Ashley Fiore, MSW, LCSW
    Kevin M. Powell, Ph.D.; resiliency and protective factors model
    Daniel J. Siegel, MD
     Visit us at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 40 min
    Keeping Kids Safe in the Homeschool Boom

    Keeping Kids Safe in the Homeschool Boom

    Homeschooling is the fastest-growing form of education in the U.S., a surge in popularity that crosses every demographic, political, and geographic line. Most parents who homeschool do so with their children’s very best interests in mind. But what about that small but very critical percentage of parents who homeschool in order to hide their child from public view and abuse them? How do we create a policy environment that enhances safety for all children? And how can we factor a homeschool population into child abuse prevention and intervention efforts? Join us as we speak with Angela Grimberg from the Coalition for Responsible Home Education.
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (02:19)About homeschooling (04:38)Research (08:10)Public policy recommendations (11:04)Advice for child abuse professionals (14:47)Parents’ reactions (20:31)Share and subscribe (22:42) Links:
    Angela Grimberg, executive director, the Coalition for Responsible Home Education
    Homeschooling’s Invisible Children database
    Homeschooling: Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (October 8, 2023) featured the Coalition
    11 states with no homeschooling notification requirements: Alaska, Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Montana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Texas
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 23 min
    Cultural Considerations Working With Middle Eastern and North African Families

    Cultural Considerations Working With Middle Eastern and North African Families

    In the U.S., there are at least 1.2 million immigrants from Middle Eastern and North African countries, and close to 4 million descendants from prior waves of immigration. Yet there’s very little research on the experiences of those families with the U.S. child welfare system. What do we need to know to deliver relevant and culturally appropriate services? Are we affected by assumptions or stereotypes? Do we understand these families’ unique challenges and strengths? Dr. Marina Bassili joined us to help us explore the topic.
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (1:53)What are MENA families? (4:25)Families’ trauma history (9:15)Myths, stereotypes, biases (12:31)Cultural specifics to pay attention to (18:20)Corporal punishment (20:42)Advice for child abuse professionals (23:14)A cup of tea (31:42)Three takeaways (33:38)Good intentions don’t stop racism (39:05)For more information (40:46)Links:
    Marina Bassili, PsyD, licensed psychologist and adjunct faculty, Pepperdine University
    Center of Excellence for Children in State Custody
    Gimel Rogers, PsyD, ABPP
    “Cultural Considerations for Families Involved in the Child Welfare System: A Focus on Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) Families,” Marina Bassili, PsyD; Gimel Rogers, PsyD, ABPP; APSAC Advisor, 2023 Number 2
    International Organization for Migration
     
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the showDid you like this episode? Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.

    • 41 min

Top Podcasts In Science

Reinvent Yourself with Dr. Tara
Dr. Tara Swart Bieber
Ologies with Alie Ward
Alie Ward
Hidden Brain
Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam
Making Sense with Sam Harris
Sam Harris
StarTalk Radio
Neil deGrasse Tyson
Radiolab
WNYC Studios

You Might Also Like

This American Life
This American Life
The Daily
The New York Times
We Can Do Hard Things
Glennon Doyle and Audacy
Serial
Serial Productions & The New York Times
Up First
NPR
SmartLess
Jason Bateman, Sean Hayes, Will Arnett