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Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…

COMPLEXITY Santa Fe Institute, Michael Garfield

    • Biowissenschaften
    • 4.5 • 4 Bewertungen

Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…

    Peter Dodds on Text-Based Timeline Analysis & New Instruments for The Science of Stories

    Peter Dodds on Text-Based Timeline Analysis & New Instruments for The Science of Stories

    "There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.”
    – Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
    When human beings saw the first pictures of the Earth from space, the impact was transformative. New instruments for taking in new vistas, for understanding our relationships and contexts at a different scale, have in some ways defined the history of not just science but the evolution of intelligence. And now, thanks to the surfeit of textual data offered up by social media, researchers can peer into the dynamics of human society and analyze the turbulent flows of stories that drive our collective behavior and twist time itself into nonlinear structures. As a species, we are on the cusp of a new epoch in which the body politic reveals itself to us in real-time like a single human body in an MRI. How will these tools change how we think about the world and what it means to be a person in it?
    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.
    This week we speak with Peter Dodds of the University of Vermont’s Complex Systems Center and Computational Story Lab about how to use Twitter data as a kind of satellite telescope observing the collective mentation of humankind — what it reveals, and what it doesn’t, opening a cornucopia of questions about how we measure sentiment and the power of narrative for social control.
    Tis the season, so if you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/podcastgive — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage.
    Avid readers take note that SFI Press’ latest volume, Complexity Economics: Proceedings of the Santa Fe Institute's 2019 Fall Symposium, is now available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle eBook formats.
    Thank you for listening!
    Follow Peter Dodds at Twitter and read the papers we discuss (and many more) at Google Scholar.
    And then go play with Hedonometer & Story Wrangler.
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.
    Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.
    Follow us on social media:
    Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn

    • 1 Std. 30 Min.
    Scott Ortman on Archaeological Synthesis and Settlement Scaling Theory

    Scott Ortman on Archaeological Synthesis and Settlement Scaling Theory

    The modern world has a way of distancing itself from everything that came before it…and yet the evidence from archaeology supports a different story. While industrial societies tend to praise markets and advanced technologies as the main drivers of the last few centuries of change, a careful study of civilizations as distinct as Ancient Rome, Peru, and Central Mexico reveals an underlying uniformity. Consistent patterns have played out in human settlements across millennia and continents, regardless of the economic systems we’ve employed or the inventions on which we’ve relied. These patterns, furthermore, look just like those that govern and delimit evolutionary change; the scaling laws determining the growth of cities are, apparently, the same that led to cities in the first place, or to human social groups, or complex animals. Human settlements act as social reactors, by facilitating interactions — in other words, the functional relationships within communities drive history, and this century has more in common with the distant past than commonly believed.
    These revelations, though, might have remained invisible to us if archaeology itself had not transformed over the last few decades, evolving new approaches to cross-disciplinary synthesis. It’s time to update both our notions of the ancient world and our popular conception of the archaeologist…
    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.
    This week we talk to Former SFI Omidyar Fellow Scott Ortman, Associate Professor of Anthropology at The University of Colorado Boulder, about his work on settlement scaling theory and fostering synthesis in archaeology to advance science and benefit society.
    If you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage. Thank you for listening!
    Check out Scott’s CU Boulder Website and Google Scholar Page for more information and links to the research papers and opinion pieces we discuss in this episode.
    For more on universal scaling laws and the science of cities, revisit these earlier episodes of COMPLEXITY:
    4 — Luis Bettencourt
    10 — Melanie Moses
    17 — Chris Kempes
    33 — Tim Kohler & Marten Scheffer
    35 — Geoffrey West
    36 — Geoffrey West
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.
    Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.
    Follow us on social media:
    Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn

    • 54 Min.
    Helena Miton on Cultural Evolution in Music and Writing Systems

    Helena Miton on Cultural Evolution in Music and Writing Systems

    Organisms aren’t the only products of the evolutionary process. Cultural products such as writing, art, and music also undergo change over time, subject to both the constraints of the physical environment and the psychologies of those who make them. In recent years, the study of cultural evolution has exploded with new insights — revelations into the dynamics of how culture is transmitted, how it mutates under different pressures, and why some forms are remarkably resilient and stable across time and space. Just as in biology, patterns in the structures of our artifacts converge on universals and diverge to meet the needs of their distinct environments. Certain forces ratchet up complexity in culture, whereas others act like gravity and draw the works of different societies into shared basins of attraction. Finding the fundamentals behind both the unity and the diversity of cultures, and what cultural evolution does and doesn’t have in common with biological evolution, is a field of rich mystery. New research into structural and cognitive constraints on culture leads us into some of the most fertile questions known to science…
    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.
    This week we speak to SFI Complexity Postdoctoral Fellow, Omidyar Fellow, AND ASU-SFI Center Fellow Helena Miton about her work on cultural evolution — namely, her recent Royal Society Proceedings B paper on "How material constraints affect the cultural evolution of rhythm" with Thomas Wolf, Cordula Vesper, Günther Knoblich, and Dan Sperber and the Current Anthropology pre-print she co-authored on "The predictable evolution of letter shapes: An emergent script of West Africa recapitulates historical change in writing systems" with Piers Kelly, James Winters, and Olivier Morin.
    If you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage. Thank you for listening!
    Check out Helena’s SFI Page, Google Scholar Page, and Twitter Account.
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.
    Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.
    Follow us on social media:
    Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn

    • 1 Std. 1 Min.
    David Wolpert on The No Free Lunch Theorems and Why They Undermine The Scientific Method

    David Wolpert on The No Free Lunch Theorems and Why They Undermine The Scientific Method

    On the one hand, we have math: a world of forms and patterns, a priori logic, timeless and consistent. On the other, we have physics: messy and embodied interactions, context-dependent and contingent on a changing world. And yet, many people get the two confused, including physicists and mathematicians. Where the two meet, and the nature of the boundary between them, is a matter of debate — one of the greatest puzzles known to science and philosophy — but some things can be said for sure about what can and cannot be accomplished in the search for ever-better models of our world. One is that every model must contain assumptions, and that there’s no way to prove a given strategy will outperform all others in all possible scenarios. This insight, captured in the legendary No Free Lunch theorems by SFI’s David Wolpert and William Macready, has enormous implications for the way think about intelligence, computers, and the living world.  In the twenty-plus years since its publication, No Free Lunch has sparked intense debate about the kinds of claims we are, and are not, justified in making…
    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe. This week we speak with SFI Professor David Wolpert about the No Free Lunch Theorems and what they mean for life, the universe, and everything…
     
    Dive into David Wolpert’s website:
    https://davidwolpert.weebly.com/

    and Google Scholar page:
    https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=PRjgI8kAAAAJ&hl=en
     
    If you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage. Thank you for listening!
     
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.
     
    Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.
     
    Follow us on social media: Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn

    • 52 Min.
    Introducing Alien Crash Site, a new SFI Podcast with host Caitlin McShea

    Introducing Alien Crash Site, a new SFI Podcast with host Caitlin McShea

    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.
    This week we present something different: SFI’s InterPlanetary Project is excited to announce a new podcast, Alien Crash Site, in which we ask some of the most interesting people we know — scientists, artists, authors, and athletes — what strange technologies they might hope to find in a “Zone” like the alien visitation area from the Strugatsky brothers’ novel, Roadside Picnic (adapted to film as Stalker by Andrei Tarkovsky). 
    In this special teaser episode, we present clips from the first three episodes of Alien Crash Site, hosted by IPFest Director Caitlin McShea, with guests:
    David Krakauer, SFI President, evolutionary biologist, and William H. Miller Professor of Complexity;
    Kate Greene, former laser physicist turned science journalist, essayist, and human guinea pig on the HI SEAS Mars mission simulation;
    and Ashton Eaton, two-time Olympic gold medalist decathlete now working with Intel to design human performance tracking technology.
    Go deeper into the Zone after listening with the following papers, articles, and videos:
    “The physical limits of communication or Why any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from noise” by Michael Lachmann et al.
    https://aapt.scitation.org/doi/10.1119/1.1773578
    “The Information Theory of Individuality” by David Krakauer et al.
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12064-020-00313-7
    "Agnostic Approaches to Extant Life Detection" by Natalie Grefenstette et al.
    https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lifeonmars2019/pdf/5026.pdf
    Complexity Episode 41: Agnostic Biosignature Detection with Natalie Grefenstette
    https://complexity.simplecast.com/episodes/41
    Complexity Episode 2: The Origins of Life with David Krakauer, Sarah Maurer, and Chris Kempes
    https://complexity.simplecast.com/episodes/2
    SFI’s InterPlanetary Project & Festival YouTube Playlist:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYzOPIgwqUk&list=PLZlVBTf7N6GrzcLkqil5vyJQQd6JA-H3a
    “Alien Nations: Why Life on Other Planets Will Resemble Ours” by Steve LeVine at OneZero on Medium
    https://onezero.medium.com/alien-nations-why-life-on-other-planets-will-resemble-ours-15fb4ede6fe7
    For show notes, research links, transcripts, and more, visit complexity.simplecast.com.
    If you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage. Thank you for listening!
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.
    Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano. 
    Interstitial music from “Martian Arts” by Michael Garfield.
    Follow us on social media:
    Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn

    • 20 Min.
    Vicky Yang & Henrik Olsson on Political Polling & Polarization: How We Make Decisions & Identities

    Vicky Yang & Henrik Olsson on Political Polling & Polarization: How We Make Decisions & Identities

    Whether you live in the USA or have just been watching the circus from afar, chances are that you agree: “polarization” dominates descriptions of the social landscape. Judging from the news alone, one might think the States have never been so painfully divided…yet nuanced public polls, and new behavioral models, suggest another narrative: the United States is largely moderate, and people have much more in common with each other than they think. There’s no denying our predicament: cognitive biases lead us to “out-group” one another even when we might be allies, and the game of politics drives a two-party system into ever-more-intense division, until something has to give. But the same evidence from social science offers hope, that we might find a way to harness our collective thinking processes for the sake of everyone and row together toward a future big enough to hold our disagreements.
    Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I’m your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we’ll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.
    In this episode we talk to SFI External Professor Henrik Olsson and SFI Complexity Postdoctoral Fellow, Omidyar Fellow, and Baird Hurst Scholar Vicky C. Yang about their work on social cognition and political identity. In a conversation that couldn’t be more timely, we ask: How can we leverage an understanding of networks for better political polling and prediction? What are the meaningful differences between one’s values and one’s affiliations? And is the American two-party system working for or against a cohesive republic?
    If you value our research and communication efforts, please consider making a donation at santafe.edu/give — and/or rating and reviewing us at Apple Podcasts. You can find numerous other ways to engage with us at santafe.edu/engage. Thank you for listening!
    Henrik’s Google Scholar Page
    Vicky’s Google Scholar Page
    Research we discuss in this episode:
    Falling Through the Cracks: A Dynamical Model for the Formation of In-Groups and Out-Groups
    A Sampling Model of Social Judgment
    Harvesting the wisdom of crowds for election predictions using the Bayesian Truth Serum
    Why are U.S. Parties So Polarized? A "Satisficing" Dynamical Model
    Do two parties represent the US? Clustering analysis of US public ideology survey
    Project Page for the SFI-USC Dornslife Polling Research Collaboration
    For more on social cognition and collective decision-making, listen to COMPLEXITY episodes 9 with Mirta Galesic and 20 with Albert Kao.
    Follow us on social media:
    Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedIn
    Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode
    Podcast Theme Music by Mitch Mignano

    • 1 Std. 10 Min.

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