300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Field: Biden’s Last Hope

    The Field: Biden’s Last Hope

    Former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr. was once a clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic nomination. Now, he is fighting back from a string of losses and staking his candidacy on his ability to win tomorrow’s South Carolina primary, the first in a state with a large black population. But will he win, and if the margin isn’t as decisive as he hopes, can he stay in the race? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times traveled to South Carolina with Clare Toeniskoetter and Annie Brown, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: A new poll showed Mr. Biden with a wide lead in South Carolina, with Senator Bernie Sanders and hedge fund billionaire Tom Steyer trailing behind.Mr. Biden lashed out after reports that Mr, Sanders considered mounting a primary challenge to President Barack Obama in 2012, saying it was “one of the reasons I resent Bernie.”Churches have long played the primary role in mobilizing black support in South Carolina. So how are candidates faring among congregations?

    • 36 min
    The Coronavirus Goes Global

    The Coronavirus Goes Global

    What began as a public health crisis in China is well on the way to becoming a pandemic. And while there is a lot of news about the coronavirus, there is also a lack of understanding about the severity of the threat. As officials warn of a potential outbreak in the U.S., we ask: How bad could the coronavirus get? Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: President Trump sought to reassure the country that the U.S. government was controlling the spread of the coronavirus after his administration weathered days of criticism.Here are the latest updates on the illness’s sweep around the world, with cases in at least 44 countries.What can you do to protect yourself and your family from the virus?

    • 23 min
    Why Russia Is Rooting for Both Trump and Sanders

    Why Russia Is Rooting for Both Trump and Sanders

    U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that the Russian government is attempting to interfere in the 2020 presidential race — but it is doing so by supporting two very different candidates. So why is Russia rooting for both President Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Mr. Sanders was briefed on potential interference, and when details of the attempts emerged, he ratcheted up his attacks on Russia, warning President Vladimir V. Putin to stay out of the presidential election.Intelligence officials warned House lawmakers last week that Russia was interfering in the 2020 campaign to try to get the president re-elected. Mr. Trump was angry the intelligence briefing was held at all.What exactly do intelligence officials mean by “interference”? We don’t know, and officials can’t seem to agree on the scope of the meddling.

    • 22 min
    The Latest: The South Carolina Debate

    The Latest: The South Carolina Debate

    On the debate stage in Charleston, candidates went after Senator Bernie Sanders, painting his potential nomination as dangerous for the party and questioning his chances of winning against President Trump.

    “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

    • 7 min
    The Weinstein Jury Believed the Women

    The Weinstein Jury Believed the Women

    Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do — and what it means that they did it.

    Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Mr. Weinstein was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial at which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.Sex crimes are notoriously difficult to litigate, often because the cases are so intricate. But for many, Mr. Weinstein’s trial was a crucial landmark in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual misconduct.Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years.

    • 23 min
    Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?

    Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?

    In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Laurence D. Fink, the founder of the world’s largest asset management company, sparked the shift toward climate-focused corporate policies in his annual letter to C.E.O.’s. Here’s what the letter said, and why it matters.Protecting the environment and tackling climate change have climbed the list of Americans’ political priorities this year as economic concerns have faded. But the issue is as partisan as ever.

    • 25 min

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