300 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Business Daily BBC

    • Business
    • 4.5 • 295 Ratings

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

    Business Weekly

    Business Weekly

    Millions of people in Afghanistan are living in extreme poverty as prices rise and salaries go unpaid. There are warnings that hunger will follow the devastating drought, just as the cold weather sets in. How will the world respond to calls for help? Business Weekly hears from development economist and former World Bank expert in Afghanistan Dr William Byrd. Plus, as the supply chain gets clogged across the world- we’ll ask how they can be made more resilient? We also hear from Berlin, where voters have said yes to a radical plan to help make housing more affordable. And as William Shatner blasts off into space, we ask if the 90-year-old actor can be called an influencer? Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

    • 50 min
    Eyes on climate: new ideas to fight global warming

    Eyes on climate: new ideas to fight global warming

    As the world turns its attention to addressing climate change, Business Daily is in Edinburgh. We bring you an inside glimpse of the conversations setting the agenda ahead of the UN climate conference COP 26, which starts in Glasgow in just over two weeks. Here in the Scottish capital, the ideas company TED - famous for Ted Talks - is holding its own climate summit, Countdown. It puts CEOs, government ministers, philanthropists and activists all in the same room. Vivienne Nunis hears from Pacific Islander Selina Leem, who explains how her home country, the Marshall Islands, is already dealing with rising sea levels. Jim Snabbe, the chairman of the world's biggest shipping firm, tells us how Maersk plans to move to a new green fuel, while Denmark's energy minister explains his country's plans to vastly scale-up wind power production.

    Producer: Sarah Treanor
    Image: Selina Leem. Credit: Skoll.org

    • 17 min
    The supply chain's weak link

    The supply chain's weak link

    How disruption in a single port, factory or freight centre can cause global chaos. Ed Butler speaks with Stavros Karamperidis, an expert in maritime economics at the University of Plymouth, and Kent Jones, professor of economics at Babson College in the US. Meanwhile, chief economist at Enodo Economics, Diana Choyleva, explains how China's energy crisis will impact exports and the price we pay for goods, and Professor Marc Busch from Georgetown University explains why he thinks governments should leave big businesses to solve supply issues themselves.

    (Photo: a container ship is unloaded at a dock in the US. Credit: Reuters)

    • 17 min
    China's gaming crackdown

    China's gaming crackdown

    Why the government doesn't like video games, and what's next for China's gaming culture. Ed Butler speaks to Josh Ye, who covers gaming for the South China Morning Post, and Professor Steve Tsang, director of the SOAS China Institute. German professional League of Legends player Maurice 'Amazing' Stückenschneider describes China's current dominance in the world of eSports, and the damage that restricting playing hours could do, and Chinese games investor Charlie Moseley describes how the increasing pressure from authorities is affecting games developers in the country today.

    (Photo: League of Legends players at a tournament in Shanghai, Credit: Riot Games Inc via Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    The economics of older mums

    The economics of older mums

    Why many women are delaying motherhood, how is technology helping, and what does the law say about all things fertility and the workplace. Zoe Kleinman speaks to lawyer Louisa Ghevaert, to Dame Cathy Warwick, chair of the British Pregnancy Advisory service, and others.
    (Picture credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    The economics of donkeys

    The economics of donkeys

    There are an estimated ten million donkeys in sub Saharan Africa, many providing crucial roles supporting the livelihoods of low income families. We explore why these beasts of burden are so important to the economics of the region, and how demand from China for the skins of donkeys is worrying many across Africa. We visit a donkey sanctuary in Lamu, Kenya, and speak to one campaigner trying to stop the slaughter of donkeys for the export of their skins. We also hear how donkeys support economic freedom for women, from Emmanuel Sarr, regional director for the charity Brooke, based in Senegal. Image: A donkey. Credit: BBC

    Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
    Producer: Sarah Treanor

    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
295 Ratings

295 Ratings

greekship ,

Sad to learn that Manuela is leaving

She makes the show – a perfect example of enthusiasm, knowledge and politeness with her interviewees.

markysparky666 ,

Going downhill

This used to be an excellent and informative podcast on business issues of the day.

However lately it’s now turned into a whinging social justice rant with Ed Butler keeping this podcast barely credible.

If it keeps on this trajectory I will be unsubscribing

bdfy9 ,

Love it

Manuela Saragosa is awesome, the content is great

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