84 episodes

The ChinaPower Podcast dissects critical issues underpinning China’s emergence as a global power. Hosted by Bonnie S. Glaser director of the CSIS China Power Project.

ChinaPower Center for Strategic and International Studies

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    • 4.6 • 10 Ratings

The ChinaPower Podcast dissects critical issues underpinning China’s emergence as a global power. Hosted by Bonnie S. Glaser director of the CSIS China Power Project.

    Controlling Advanced Technology Exports: A Conversation with Roslyn Layton and James Lewis

    Controlling Advanced Technology Exports: A Conversation with Roslyn Layton and James Lewis

    In this episode, Dr. Roslyn Layton and Dr. James Lewis discuss how to control the proliferation of technologies for military use with a special focus on China. Our guests explain the history of US export policy regarding advanced technology, noting the delicate balance between opportunities for private enterprise and the needs of national security. They describe the Wassenar Agreement and its impact on current US advanced technology exports to China. Dr. Layton argues in favor of US designation of companies as military-end-users in China as one method to prevent US technology from being transferred to China’s military. Dr. Lewis analyzes China’s progress in its semiconductor industry, noting that China is still dependent on Western technology. Our guests also interpret China’s actions in retaliation to international technology export restrictions. Lastly, our guests evaluate how the Trump administration has acted in its approach to China and recommend actions the incoming Biden administration should take. 
     
    Dr. Roslyn Layton is a visiting researcher at Aalborg University Center for Communication, Media, and Information Technologies and Senior Vice President at Strand Consult. Dr. Layton focuses on evidence-based policy for the information, communications, and digital technology industries. Dr. James Lewis is a senior vice president and director of the Strategic Technologies Program at CSIS. He has authored numerous publications on the relationship between technology, innovation, and national power.

    • 27 min
    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 5

    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 5

    This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the last of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. 
     
    Prior to the debate, Representative Rick Larsen delivered keynote remarks on the challenges and opportunities posed by China’s growing power and the view from Congress, followed by a Q&A conversation hosted by Bonnie Glaser, CSIS senior adviser for Asia and director of the China Power Project.
     
    Representative Rick Larsen represents the Second Congressional District of Washington State. Representative Larsen is a co-chair of the bipartisan US-China Working Group, which educates Members of Congress about bilateral issues through meetings and briefings with academic, business, and political leaders from the US and China. Representative Larsen has visited China eleven times.
     
    Following the keynote remarks, the China Power Project hosted a debate on the proposition: "Selective US-China economic decoupling will set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader." 
     
    The Trump administration has imposed restrictions on exports to leading Chinese telecom and semiconductor companies. In addition, the US has taken measures to encourage American companies to diversify their production and supply chains in order to reduce reliance on China. Given the interconnectedness of the global economy, these efforts could pose a challenge to the competitiveness of Chinese tech firms and manufacturers.
     
    Matthew Turpin, Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, argued that US-China decoupling will set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader. Rebecca Fannin, Founder of Silicon Dragon Ventures, argued that US-China economic decoupling will not set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader.
     
    This event is made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    • 1 hr 38 min
    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 4

    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 4

    This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the fourth of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The fourth debate took place on December 9, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: Within the next five years, China will use significant military force against a country on its periphery.
    Under President Xi Jinping, China’s military capabilities have continued to grow. China has stepped up military pressure on Taiwan and conducted frequent large-scale military exercises in the South China Sea. In addition, border tensions with India reached the highest level in decades. A skirmish in June 2020 led to fatalities on both sides. China’s last significant uses of force were in the 1980s along the land border with Vietnam, and in the 1988 clash over Johnson South in the South China Sea.
    Oriana Skylar Mastro, Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, and Foreign and Defense Policy Fellow at American Enterprise Institute (AEI), argued that China will use military force against a country on its periphery within the next five years. M. Taylor Fravel, Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Security Studies Program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), argued that China will not use military force on a country on its periphery within the next five years.
    This event is made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 3

    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 3

    This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the third of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The third debate took place on December 3, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: China will exploit the Covid-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor.
     
    As the Covid-19 pandemic spread across the globe, China increased pressure on India, Taiwan, and several Southeast Asian neighbors that have territorial claims in the South China Sea. Chinese officials also lashed out at some foreign governments, which many characterized as “wolf warrior diplomacy.” In addition, China has embarked on a public health-diplomacy campaign, promising personal protective equipment and preferential vaccine access to developing nations and partners of China’s Belt and Road Initiative.
     
    Yan Xuetong, Dean of the Institute of Modern International Relations at Tsinghua University, argued that China will exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor. Aaron Friedberg, Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University, argued that China will not exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor.
     
    This event is made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 2

    China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 2

    This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the second of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The second debate took place on November 24, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: “One country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead.
     
    When Hong Kong was handed over to China in 1997​, its people were promised that they would continue to enjoy a high degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” formula for at least 50 years. However, the Chinese government passed a National Security Law for Hong Kong in June 2020, which granted Beijing unprecedented powers over the city. The passing of this law has led some to question whether “one country, two systems” remains intact.
     
    Daniel Russel, Vice President for International Security and Diplomacy at the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) and former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead. Regina Ip, legislator and member of Hong Kong's Executive Council, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is still alive.
     
    This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    China’s Power: Up for Debate: Debate 1

    China’s Power: Up for Debate: Debate 1

    This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the first of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s fifth annual conference, which comprised five live online debates. The first debate took place on November 19 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: The US-China relationship can best be described as a “new Cold War.”
    Over the last several years, relations between the United States and China have grown increasingly tense. Both the United States and China have expelled journalists and closed consulates amid heightened trade tensions and rancor about responsibility for Covid-19. Some experts believe Beijing is seeking to export its development model and that US-China competition has spread to the ideological realm. Other experts disagree, arguing that the Chinese Communist Party is more focused on defending against threats to its rule at home.
    Hal Brands, Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), argued that the US-China relationship can best be described as a “new Cold War.” Melvyn Leffler, Edward Stettinius Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Virginia, argued that the US-China relationship cannot be described as a “new Cold War.”
    This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    • 1 hr 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

caljphy ,

Thoroughly interesting

Very informative and helpful. Very objective and impartial as one can possibly be. It definitely has widened my perspective beyond what I knew via mainstream news outlets.

Chineseblister ,

Propaganda

Another boot licker

Emi226 ,

Good source for ideas about China/Chinese power

Interesting and accessable.

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