48 episodes

Can talking about death, loss and grief help us to live? This could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

Deep, Down & Desi BBC

    • Comedy

Can talking about death, loss and grief help us to live? This could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    Dead Talk

    Dead Talk

    In the last episode of this series, Saima and Maleena talk about the power of talking.

    Grief can be one of the biggest tests to your mental health. So is there a ‘right’ way to cope with loss?

    They invite Rabbil to the café to hear his story about how he lost his Aunt and his subsequent struggles with depression.

    Hypnotherapist Dipti then joins them to give her professional opinion and chat about her own story of grief that inspired her career as a mental health practitioner.

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement:
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 45 min
    Who Really Cares?

    Who Really Cares?

    Within the British Asian community, care can be a controversial subject. Who should look after you when you’re in your final days and what should you expect from the pros?

    Saima and Maleena chat about family expectations, the Asian stigma of so-called ‘old people’s homes’ and the benefits of modern palliative care.

    Kamalpreet pops into the cafe to share her experience of looking after her Gran who suffered from dementia and how she navigated the complexities of the care system before she passed away.

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukaemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement:
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 41 min
    Death Admin

    Death Admin

    If death is inevitable, then planning for it is essential. But it can also be one of the most daunting things that you have to deal with and too many put it off until the very last minute of life.

    Maleena chats to Saima in the café about what getting your affairs in order actually means - or the ‘Death Admin’ as she likes to call it.

    They hear from Dan, who created a will writing start-up that brings the legal process into the modern digital era.

    And Maleena visits the Garden’s Of Peace, the UK’s largest Muslim cemetery, to hear about how tens-of-thousands have balanced their British Asian identity even after they die.

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukaemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...


    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 39 min
    Secret Love, Hidden Loss

    Secret Love, Hidden Loss

    In this episode of Fresh To Death, Saima and Maleena discuss how honest you can be about your grief and what it’s like dealing with death in unfamiliar surroundings.

    Maleena uncovers an incredible story of a young woman who goes on holiday with her secret boyfriend and tragically has to return home without him.

    Back at the café, Saima and Maleena chat about the complex cultural issues when discussing the most personal of circumstances, including who you can share your love and pain with.

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukaemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 41 min
    Raj’s Story.

    Raj’s Story.

    In this episode of Fresh To Death, Saima and Maleena explore what it's like to deal with death in the family.

    They speak to Raj, who started a Will writing service for the Sikh community with his wife, before being hit with the cruellest of coincidences. Can the experience of dealing with death as a professional help you grieve your own personal losses?

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukaemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 50 min
    Our Stories

    Our Stories

    In this episode of Fresh To Death, Saima and Maleena share their experiences of dealing with death.

    Saima opened Masala Wala cafe with her family, a small Pakistani restaurant that serves her mother’s recipes with love and charm. Out of nowhere, she was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer, before she even turned 30. Her life has been dramatically cut short - without treatment, she wouldn’t be here today.

    After dealing with her diagnosis, she talks frankly on how she’s getting over dying, so she can get on with living.

    Maleena, a Journalist and Producer, lost her brother when they were both teenagers, after a long battle with leukemia. As she became an adult, her father passed away suddenly and without warning. She shares openly what it’s like growing up with grief, the guilt of being left behind and how her identity as a British Asian was tested to its limits.

    Together, they bond over their unique perspectives on life and death and ponder the ultimate question - why?

    Join them for their chat over a cup of chai - this could be the most important podcast of your afterlife...

    If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme you can find support at the BBC Action line for bereavement: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4MmhHDSbdDmTpVJhBs2v4Py/information-and-support-bereavement

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

Hpotpot ,

It’s Death not Deaf

For a podcast about death it’s really irritating that the host can’t pronounce the word death properly. It’s so grating, I can’t listen any more. It’s death not deaf.

charmnstyle ,

Refreshing honest, deep and real!

MASSIVELY RECOMMENDED What an awesome series, I couldn't stop listening! The hosts are so brave sharing their stories, I genuinely laughed and cried! Great to hear an important conversation happen.

Can't wait to hear more.

seebha ,

Where are you really from?

Love listening to Nim, Sunil and Eshan - very good banter

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