65 episodes

Fire Science Show is connecting fire researchers and practitioners with a society of fire engineers, firefighters, architects, designers and all others, who are genuinely interested in creating a fire-safe future. Through interviews with a diverse group of experts, we present the history of our field as well as the most novel advancements. We hope the Fire Science Show becomes your weekly source of fire science knowledge and entertainment.

Fire Science Show Wojciech Wegrzynski

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

Fire Science Show is connecting fire researchers and practitioners with a society of fire engineers, firefighters, architects, designers and all others, who are genuinely interested in creating a fire-safe future. Through interviews with a diverse group of experts, we present the history of our field as well as the most novel advancements. We hope the Fire Science Show becomes your weekly source of fire science knowledge and entertainment.

    063 - Why do we need a handbook of fire and the environment with Brian Meacham and Margaret McNamee

    063 - Why do we need a handbook of fire and the environment with Brian Meacham and Margaret McNamee

    Do we need another fire handbook? If so, what handbook would that be? I guess a question like this must have gone through Brian Meachams' mind when he got the idea for a handbook of fire and environment. And he got a brilliant co-editor - Margaret McNamee to support him in this tough work. The effect - a complete piece on the environmental effects of fires - but beyond just smoke and contamination. A piece that deals with the complexities of the modern world, sustainability and resilience. One that considers product lifecycle assessment as much as the toxicity of its combustion products. A holistic view gives us fire engineers a different lens to view our work through.

    In this episode, I interview Brian and Margaret on why this handbook came to life.  That why is probably the most important question to be asked. If there was no reason, why go through all this effort to structurize and condense the knowledge we have so far amassed? If why does not exist, why would anyone go through the hassle of considering one more (difficult) thing in their project?

    Well, I hope I won't spoil the episode, but the why exists. And it is a pretty good one. And to learn it, you have to dig into this episode!

    You can find the handbook here:
    https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-030-94356-1#about-this-book

    It is behind a paywall, but many universities and institutes should have free access!

    The publisher describes this handbook as:
    The fundamental purpose of this handbook is to raise awareness about the environmental impacts of fire and fire suppression, primarily within the fire engineering and firefighting communities, but also within the environmental engineering and planning disciplines. The Handbook provides readers with a fundamental understanding of the problem and its magnitude and includes a set of tools and methods for assessing environmental, social and financial impacts, and a set of tools for identifying and selecting appropriate mitigation options.
    Presents previously unavailable material on identification, assessment and mitigation of environmental firesFacilitates readers with knowledge in one area to focus on topics where they lack expertiseExtensively cites detailed studies and reports to support in-depth study in each of the topic areas

    • 55 min
    062 - BIM (not only for fire) with Peter Thompson and Rino Lovreglio

    062 - BIM (not only for fire) with Peter Thompson and Rino Lovreglio

    It does not matter if you hate or love BIM, does not matter if you use it daily or have no idea what it is... Building Information Modelling will be an important part of our engineering future and we better get used to it.  In this episode, I talk to Peter Thompson of GHD, who had previously worked at Autodesk as a Revit developer, and prof. Ruggiero Lovreglio, a teacher of computer methods in design at Massey University. Having two experts - one a developer, and the other a user of BIM I try to get balanced answers on what BIM means for Fire Safety Engineering and how will it impact our future. And I must say I am surprised by the answers - I was pretty sure we will spend an hour talking about issues with transferring the models, but after this talk, this whole BIM environment seems like a pretty good idea!

    I hope you will also enjoy this journey through the near and a bit future of BIM technology. Looking forward to hear back from you about your BIM journeys, thoughts and ideas on how make this the technology of the future FSE.

    • 59 min
    061 - Glazing in fire with Yu Wang

    061 - Glazing in fire with Yu Wang

    The relation between ventilation conditions and fire severity is quite a fundamental one. You don't even have to be a fire safety engineer to realize that more air means a bigger fire. But how does air get into the compartment fire in the first place?

    Through broken windows of course!

    And here we come to the subject of today's episode. Because with all the considerable improvements in glazing technologies for building facades, is it really okay to assume that the glazing has failed and all we are left is a giant hole that allows the air flow inside? How does the glass fail, and when and what exactly are the consequences of this failure? These are the questions asked to professor Wang Yu of the State Key Laboratory of Fire Science (SKLFS) at USTC, China. Yu takes me through his research from his PhD at Edinburgh, and through more recent experiments carried out by his group in China. We discuss FEM modelling of glass and some specific behaviour of modern glazing technologies exposed to different kinds of fires.

    If you would like to learn more about this fundamental topic, here are some great further reading resources (Yu has so far 29 papers on this subject and these are just the tip of the iceberg!):
    Experimental study on fallout behaviour of tempered glass façades with different frame insulation conditions in an enclosure fireInvestigation of the thermal response and breakage mechanism of point-supported glass facade under wind loadDetermination of critical fallout condition of tempered glass in an enclosure fireThe effect of glass panel dimension on the fire response of glass façadesCrack evolution process of window glass under radiant heatingDetermination of critical breakage conditions for double glazing in fire

    • 47 min
    060 - How PV panels change the fire behaviour of roofs with Jens Kristensen

    060 - How PV panels change the fire behaviour of roofs with Jens Kristensen

    Join Jens in his public presentation on August 19th 2022, at 1 PM Copenhagen time. Please check here for the link! I'll update it as soon as I receive it.

    If a PV panel is fire safe, and the roof is fire safe, what is the outcome of a panel placed on the roof? Not a great surprise that merging two things that meet their requirements within their respectable eco-systems gives a not such a fire-safe outcome after all... This is the difference between considering systems versus product characteristics, and in relation to the fire safety of PV panels, something truly unique to my today's guest - dr Jens Steemann Kristensen.

    Jens has gone a long way from burning PV panels in a cone calorimeter to trying to understand the holistic behaviour of panels placed on the roof. Join me in learning about his journey, his doubts and findings, and most importantly - some really interesting findings in how the issue of fire-safe PV roofs can be solved.

    • 43 min
    059 - Residential fire safety with Dan Madrzykowski and Charlie Fleischmann

    059 - Residential fire safety with Dan Madrzykowski and Charlie Fleischmann

    How much the fire scene at households has changed over the last 30 years? Why modern furniture burns worse than one made with wood, cotton and other natural materials? And what does that mean to firefighting? What challenges do modern firefighters face fighting residential fires... There is so many questions to be asked about residential fires, and in this episode, I answer a lot of them with the firefighting research legends - Dan Madrzykowski of the UL Fire Safety Research Institute and professor Charlie Fleischmann from the University of Canterbury.

    After listening to this episode you must check the website of the UL FSRI! That is a vault fille with fire science gold, not to be missed by anyone passionate about fire safety.

    And if you are here to find some info about the Fire Hose Prop we have discussed, seek no more - just follow this link to learn all about it.

    • 55 min
    058 - Animal pyrocognition - a path to undestand our beginnings with fire with Ivo Jacobs

    058 - Animal pyrocognition - a path to undestand our beginnings with fire with Ivo Jacobs

    Have you wondered how fire science started? But I mean the real real start... not 1666 one, nor the one when we've started to build furnaces... The start when the first evolutionary ancestor of homo sapiens figured out this warm bright thing could be used to process food. The start when this bright thing was protected and used intentionally. The bright thing that was so important for our kind, that the proof for this relationship can be found literally in our anatomy... 

    The best way to study this origin would obviously be a time machine. I don't have that. But I have the second-best thing - a real scientist Dr Ivo Jacobs studying the relationship between animals and fire, to uncover how our ancestors could have learnt how to behave at the fire and how to use fire to their advantage. There is not much fire safety engineering in this episode, but there is something really magical to learning how impactful that thing we study was for our kind. And I hope you will really enjoy this.

    And if this sparked your interest, go on and check these great resources:
    Beautiful essay on pyrocognition by Ivo (a must read tbh)Short video of Japaneese snow (fire!) monkeys at a campfireStudy of New Caledonian crows

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

restf19 ,

Great podcast, inspiring topics

This Podcast is great, the line up of speakers Wojciech Wegrzynski lines up every week, the detail of questions, and the wide breadth of topics covered is truly inspiring. The amount I learn every week, from each episode, is amazing. The links provided with the podcast, to follow up on topics have been really helpful as well, and I think this show will truly help grow the connections between fire researchers and practitioners with the broader community. Well done Wojciech, and thank you for your Podcast!

reingu ,

Awesome fire science and engineering

Wojciech masters the science of talking with people and they tell him all sorts of super interesting things about fire, engineering and how to make the world safer. I strongly recommend this podcast in the more vigorous terms.

simodosss13 ,

Informative and inspiring

Thank you for creating this great podcast! Not only does it disseminate complex science in an accessible and enjoyable way, but it also inspires and motivates me as a young researcher. Thank you!

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