237 episodes

For The Wild Podcast is an anthology of the Anthropocene; focused on land-based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift away from human supremacy, endless growth and consumerism.

For The Wild For The Wild

    • Philosophy
    • 4.8 • 43 Ratings

For The Wild Podcast is an anthology of the Anthropocene; focused on land-based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift away from human supremacy, endless growth and consumerism.

    K’ASHEECHTLAA - LOUISE BRADY on restoring the Sacred

    K’ASHEECHTLAA - LOUISE BRADY on restoring the Sacred

    Many of us have access to more choices than we ever thought imaginable, in fact, it is quite easy to find ourselves amidst an abundance of products, eating foods cultivated across the world, or selecting from a myriad of variations of the same “thing”. But this “abundance” of choice masks ecological depletion, and as we gain access to that which is far from our homes, actual place-based abundance is often jeopardized. This week on the podcast we explore this in context to herring in Southeast Alaska with guest K’asheechtlaa (Louise Brady). Everything from chinook, seals, whales, eagles, halibut, and dolphins, all depend on herring directly or indirectly. In addition to nourishing so much of the Pacific marine ecosystem, these kin are embedded in the culture and spirit of Sheetʼká (Sitka). But as herring have been utilized in pet food, fertilizer, fish meal for aquariums and salmon farms, and marketed as a delicacy abroad - fisheries have been mismanaged by the state of Alaska and overfished to near extinction. K’asheechtlaa is a woman of the Tlingit nation in Sheetʼká Ḵwáan, an island off the coast of Southeast Alaska. She is Raven-Frog or Kiks.ádi Clan, Kiks.ádi women are known as the herring ladies, they have a story or original instruction that connects them spiritually, culturally, and historically to herring. K’asheechtlaa is the founder of the Herring Protectors, a grassroots movement of people that share concerns that the herring population in Sheetʼká Ḵwáan, and the culture tied to it, are under threat.

    Music by Lake Mary, The Ascent of Everest, Alexandra Blakely, and Fountainsun.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    DEVRA L. DAVIS on 5G and the Cause for Concern

    DEVRA L. DAVIS on 5G and the Cause for Concern

    When asked about implementing 5G in 2019, Brussels’ Environment Minister, Celine Fremault was quoted saying “the people of Brussels are not guinea pigs whose health I can sell at a profit. We cannot leave anything to doubt.” Comparatively here in the United States, we are bombarded with advertisements that boast about the speed, accessibility, and necessity of 5G. Of course, unlike other countries, the United States has also embraced the digitization of our life beyond recognition. There are more cell phones in the United States than there are people, so it comes as no surprise that 5G would be an easier sell to our public. Alongside guest Devra L. Davis, we take a deeper look at why the telecom industry is manufacturing demand for 5G, as well as the overwhelming amount of research on global 5G wireless networks and how they threaten various species and ecosystems. Dr. Davis is an internationally acclaimed award-winning scientist and author of more than 220 scientific publications and 3 popular books. She was the U.S. Senate confirmed Presidential appointee to the National Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board and served as an advisor to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the World Health Organization. She is currently the President of the Environmental Health Trust.

    Music by Jeremy Harris, Shay Roselip, and Tan Cologne.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    Dr. CHANDA PRESCOD-WEINSTEIN on the Night Sky and Liberation Discourse

    Dr. CHANDA PRESCOD-WEINSTEIN on the Night Sky and Liberation Discourse

    Humans have often turned to the night sky for both practical matters, like direction and orientation, as well as philosophical matters, like making sense of our place in the world and communicating with the ethereal. Despite this ancestral connection, many of us either know very little about the space above us and the galaxies around us, or we don’t even have the privilege of being able to develop this connection. Did you know 85% of matter in the universe is considered intangible “dark” matter? Have you ever wondered why it’s even called dark matter? Did you know some nation-states are still considering what it would take to mine the moon? Or that we are radically altering what the night sky looks like through the increasing presence of satellites? In this week’s episode, we explore these curiosities with Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein. Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein is an assistant professor of physics and core faculty in women’s and gender studies at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Prescod-Weinstein’s book The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred will be published in the US and Canada in March 2021.

    Music by Harrison Foster, Amaara, and Jahnavi Veronica.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    NKEM NDEFO on the Body as Compass

    NKEM NDEFO on the Body as Compass

    Intuitively, we know that we cannot remain limber, give freely, or work through the muck when our emotional, physical, and spiritual reserves are depleted - yet late-stage capitalism continues to force many of us to continue running on empty. Instead of allowing each other to burn out, what if we devoted ourselves to relearning where resilience inherently lives in our bodies? This week’s guest Nkem Ndefo explores resilience in conjunction with co-liberation and how our bodies are deep wells that are here to sustain us, as long as we listen to them. This work is not just for our wellbeing but is an important step in allowing us to engage in flexible visioning, grow our capacity for discomfort, and adequately prepare for transformation. Nkem is the founder and president of Lumos Transforms and creator of The Resilience Toolkit, a model that promotes embodied self-awareness and self-regulation in an ecologically sensitive framework and social justice context. Nkem is particularly interested in working alongside people most impacted by violence and marginalization. Music by Harrison Foster, Marian McLaughlin, Ariana Saraha, and Emily Ritz. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    CAROLINA RUBIO MACWRIGHT on the Intersections of Immigration, Assimilation, and Earth Based Wisdom

    CAROLINA RUBIO MACWRIGHT on the Intersections of Immigration, Assimilation, and Earth Based Wisdom

    In 2018 former Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, what we didn’t know was that beginning in 2017 the Trump administration ran a secret pilot program that began rapidly separating children from their families in El Paso, Texas. After running this pilot program, Customs and Border Protection unequivocally told the administration that the program was a failure because they were unable to track parents and children after separation. In the face of these conclusions, the administration went forward with their policy which ultimately separated over 2,500 children, many of whom will most likely never be reunited with their parents. In this week’s episode, we speak with artist, immigration lawyer, and activist Carolina Rubio MacWright on the ongoing travesty of family separations, the inherent trauma of U.S. detention centers, and how we can begin revamping our laws, values, policies, and systems when it comes to migration.

    Carolina Rubio MacWright is an artist, immigration lawyer, and activist fighting for immigrant and humanitarian rights. She believes ART is the most powerful way of bringing humans together and dissolving walls and cages that separate us. She has thus mixed her law and art into a non-profit called Touching Land that uses hands-on experiential arts to empower, build bridges and decolonize food.

    Music by Madelyn Ilana and Samuela Akert.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    ENRIQUE SALMÓN on Moral Landscapes Amidst Changing Ecologies

    ENRIQUE SALMÓN on Moral Landscapes Amidst Changing Ecologies

    We are often reminded of the tremendous amount of loss that transpires every day on this Earth; loss of language, biodiversity, and ancestral knowledge. In response, it’s understandable that many of us may be hyper-fixated on preserving whatever we can and fighting to stave off the mass changes that have been set in motion. But what if we challenged ourselves instead to recognize the autonomy of living knowledge, land as its own entity, and the inevitability of constant change? In this week’s episode, guest Enrique Salmón uses the lens of kincentric ecology to challenge our propensity for memory banking, our difficulty grappling with a changing Earth, and our inadvertent oversimplifications of complex living relationships. Enrique Salmón is a Rarámuri. He is head of the American Indian Studies Program at Cal State University–East Bay. He holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Arizona State University and has published many articles on Indigenous ethnobotany, agriculture, nutrition, and Traditional Ecological Knowledge. He is the author of Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity and Resilience and Iwígara.

    Music by Justin Crawmer, Katie Gray, and Sara Serpa.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
43 Ratings

43 Ratings

Mostlylitfan ,

Soul soothing

Hard hitting topics covered with sensitivity.
Great if you want to understand the climate / ecological crisis and different perspectives on ecological issues.

annainengland ,

inspired&grateful

Thank you for bringing the much needed voices of intelligence and integrity into conversations dominated by mainstream media madness. With each listening both my hope for a future worth living in and my commitment to playing my part in creating it are restored.

very funny and clever pod ,

Far left extremists

Pretending to be environmentalists

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