116 episodes

Food with a side of science and history. Every other week, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode exploring the hidden history and surprising science behind a different food- or farming-related topic, from aquaculture to ancient feasts, from cutlery to chile peppers, and from microbes to Malbec. We interview experts, visit labs, fields, and archaeological digs, and generally have lots of fun while discovering new ways to think about and understand the world through food.



Find us online at gastropod.com, follow us on Twitter @gastropodcast, and like us on Facebook at facebook.com/gastropodcast.

Gastropod Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley

    • Arts
    • 4.8, 69 Ratings

Food with a side of science and history. Every other week, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode exploring the hidden history and surprising science behind a different food- or farming-related topic, from aquaculture to ancient feasts, from cutlery to chile peppers, and from microbes to Malbec. We interview experts, visit labs, fields, and archaeological digs, and generally have lots of fun while discovering new ways to think about and understand the world through food.



Find us online at gastropod.com, follow us on Twitter @gastropodcast, and like us on Facebook at facebook.com/gastropodcast.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

MBelderson ,

A US challenger to the BBC's 'The Food Programme'

Hopefully it will grow to have the gastronomic influence of its venerable rival.

‘Gastropd’ rarely disappoints, and, even when it does, it’ll most likely be because of it’s covering something you already know a lot about. For example, I would critique ‘The Curry Chronicles’ for it’s lack of nuance when it came to the British curry. It made no mention of Madhur Jaffrey’s ground-breaking prime-time TV show in 1982 which brought Indian cooking into the home and changed forever how curries are cooked. Nor did it cover the wide range of authentic Indian restaurants found in cities with large Gujurati, Punjabi, or Bengali communities and which are hugely popular within the wider populace. Then there’s the Balti. Not a word was said about that cultural phenomenon. And it failed to mention the national shortage of cooks (forcing the closure of many curry houses) because of racist immigration policies introduced when Theresa May was Home Secretary. But these are the kind of minor criticisms which could be applied any podcast. It was still an excellent episode.

Fmicrosoft ,

Probably says something about me as well

Listening to this podcast I have the impression I'm being talked down to. It's in the language of the hosts, the gentle chiding (eg in the tea episode: you shouldn't call infusions tea), and the slow pace. This is all well researched but I'm not around for hosts treating the audience as less smart than they are.
Might be good for children as it brings to mind elementary school teachers talking to young children.

Jec52 ,

Insightful and interesting

This podcast is the best one I’ve come across by far. They always give super interesting novel facts on science and history on topics that I never would have thought about and about topic I though I knew a lot about. And they present it in a very friendly and familial tone.

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