27 episodes

Let's Talk About CBT is a podcast about cognitive behavioural therapy: what it is, what it's not and how it can be useful. Dr Lucy Maddox interviews experts in the field including people who have experienced CBT for themselves.  A mix of interviews, myth-busting and CBT jargon explained, this accessible podcast is brought to you by the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies.

www.babcp.com

Let's Talk About CBT Dr Lucy Maddox

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 61 Ratings

Let's Talk About CBT is a podcast about cognitive behavioural therapy: what it is, what it's not and how it can be useful. Dr Lucy Maddox interviews experts in the field including people who have experienced CBT for themselves.  A mix of interviews, myth-busting and CBT jargon explained, this accessible podcast is brought to you by the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies.

www.babcp.com

    Bonus Episode: What is SlowMo? And how can it help with paranoid thoughts?

    Bonus Episode: What is SlowMo? And how can it help with paranoid thoughts?

    In this bonus episode of Let's Talk About CBT, hear Dr Lucy Maddox interview Dr Tom Ward and Angie about SlowMo: digitally supported face-to-face CBT for paranoia combined with a mobile app for use in daily life.
    Show Notes
    Websites
    For more about the research check out: http://slowmotherapy.co.uk
    Angie talks about SlowMo on The One Show: https://youtu.be/lCI7LKFbyrw
    For more on BABCP visit www.babcp.com
    Articles
    These academic journal articles below are all produced by the SlowMo team to investigate the therapy.
    Ward, T., Hardy, A., Holm, R., et al. (2022) SlowMo therapy, a new digital blended therapy for fear of harm from others: An account of therapy personalisation within a targeted intervention. Psychology And Psychotherapy: Theory, Research And Practice. DOI : 10.1111/papt.12377
    Garety P, Ward T, Emsley R, et al. (2021) Effects of SlowMo, a Blended Digital Therapy Targeting Reasoning, on Paranoia Among People With Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2021 Jul 1;78(7):714-725. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.0326. PMID: 33825827; PMCID: PMC8027943.
    Hardy A, Wojdecka A, West J, et al. (2018) How Inclusive, User-Centered Design Research Can Improve Psychological Therapies for Psychosis: Development of SlowMo. JMIR Ment Health ;5(4):e11222 doi: 10.2196/11222
    Garety, P.A., Ward, T., Freeman, D. et al. (2017) SlowMo, a digital therapy targeting reasoning in paranoia, versus treatment as usual in the treatment of people who fear harm from others: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials 18, 510 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-017-2242-7
    Books
    Overcoming Paranoid and Suspicious Thoughts by Freeman, Freeman & Garety
    https://overcoming.co.uk/600/Overcoming-Paranoid-And-Suspicious-Thoughts---FreemanFreemanGarety

    • 34 min
    Evidence Based Parenting Training: What Is It and What's It Got To Do With CBT?

    Evidence Based Parenting Training: What Is It and What's It Got To Do With CBT?

    Children don't come with a manual, and parenting can be hard. What is evidence-based parenting training and how can it help? Dr Lucy Maddox interviews Sue Howson and Jane, about their experiences of delivering and receiving this intervention for parents of primary school aged children. 
     
    Show Notes and Transcript
    Sue and Jane both recommended this book:
    The Incredible Years (R): Trouble Shooting Guide for Parents of Children Aged 3-8 Years
    By Carolyn Webster-Stratton (Author)
    Sue also recommended this book:
    Helping the Noncompliant Child Family-Based Treatment for Oppositional Behaviour  Robert J. McMahon, Rex L.Forehand 2nd Edition Paperback (01 Sep 2005)  ISBN 978-1593852412

    Websites
    http://www.incredibleyears.com/
    https://theministryofparenting.com/
    https://www.nurturingmindsconsultancy.co.uk/
    For more on CBT the BABCP website is www.babcp.com
    Accredited therapists can be found at www.cbtregisteruk.com
     
    Courses
    The courses where Sue works are available here, and there are similar courses around the country:
    https://www.reading.ac.uk/charliewaller/cwi-iapt.aspx
     
    Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash
    This episode was edited by Eliza Lomas
    Transcript
    Lucy:   Hello and welcome to Let’s Talk About CBT, the podcast from the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies, BABCP. This podcast is all about CBT, what it is, what it’s not and how it can be useful.
    This episode is the last in the current series so we’ll be having a break for a bit, apart from a cheeky bonus episode, which is planned for a few months’ time so look out for that.
    Today, I’m finding out about evidence-based parenting training. This is a type of intervention for the parents of primary school aged children. It draws on similar principles to cognitive behavioural therapy about links between thoughts, feelings, behaviours and bodily sensations and ideas from social learning theory. It also draws some ideas from child development such as attachment theory and parenting styles.
    To understand more about all of this, I met with Sue Howson, parenting practitioner who works in child mental health services and Jane, a parent who has experienced the training herself.
    Jane:  My name is Jane and I’ve got a little boy called Jack who is seven and he’s in Year 3.
    Lucy:  And you’ve experienced evidence-based parenting training, is that right?
    Jane:  Yeah, I have. It’s something called the Incredible Years. And there was a really nice lady called Sue and my school put us in touch to form a group to kind of help me manage Jack a little bit more at home.
    Lucy:  So, your journey into it was that the school let you know about it?
    Jane:  Yeah. Basically, I was having a few issues with Jack at home and I think it was kind of impacting on school as well. So, I was working with the special needs coordinator and she, obviously, had me, Jack and my family in mind as someone who might benefit from working a little bit with Sue.
     I was a bit nervous at first, you know, like professionals coming in, getting involved. But she was really nice and it was really beneficial.
    Lucy: Is it okay to ask what sort of difficulties you were having at home, sort of what was going on?
    Jane:  Yeah, I can tell you now because it’s all changed, it’s much better.
    Lucy:  Oh good, that’s great to hear.
    Jane:    I mean, Jack’s a lovely boy. He’s my eldest and he’s really nice and just a bit of a joy – he is now. But I think one of the main things that I was struggling with, with him, was kind of difficulties with falling asleep. In the evenings, he would always want me to fall asleep either next to him or in his bed and that was kind of impacting on our evening, mine and my husband’s quite a lot. And it was taking up a lot of time and I think evenings are quite hard because you’re so tired and you just want to go to bed.
    So, that was one of the issues. And the no sleep was impacting on

    • 38 min
    CBT for Depression

    CBT for Depression

    In this episode Dr Lucy Maddox speaks to Sharon and Dr Anne Garland, about CBT for depression. Hear how Sharon describes it, and how both group and individual therapy helped. 
     
     
    Show Notes and Transcript
    Books
    Overcoming Depression by Paul Gilbert
    Podcast Episodes
    CBT for Perfectionism
    Compassion Focussed Therapy
    Websites
    www.babcp.com
    www.cbtregisteruk.com
    Image by Kevin Mueller on Unsplash
    Transcript
     
    Lucy: Hello and welcome to Let’s Talk About CBT, the podcast from the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies, BABCP. This podcast is all about CBT, what it is, what it’s not and how it can be useful.  

    In this episode we’re thinking about CBT for depression. I spoke with Dr Anne Garland who spent 25 years working with people who experience depression and Sharon, who has experienced it herself.  

    Both Anne and Sharon come from a nursing background. Anne now works at the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre as a consultant psychotherapist, but she used to work in Nottingham, which is where Sharon had CBT for depression. Here’s Sharon.  

    How would you describe what depression is like?  

    Sharon: When I was going to school, when I was a little girl, an infant, we would have to go over the fields because I lived in the country, and go down. I could hear the bell of the junior school but couldn’t find it because of the fog. I walked round and round, I was five, walked round and round and round in those fields trying to get to the bell where I knew I would be safe and being terrified on my own. And that’s how it feels actually. Darkness, cold, very frightening.  

    Lucy: I asked Anne how depression gets diagnosed and she described a range of symptoms.  

    Anne: In its acute phase it’s characterised by what would be considered a range of symptoms. So, tiredness, lethargy, lack of motivation, poor concentration, difficulty remembering. Some of the most debilitating symptoms are often disturbed sleep and absence of any sense of enjoyment or pleasure in life and that can be very distressing to people. People can be really plagued with suicidal thoughts and feelings of hopelessness that life is pointless.  

    I think one of the most devastating things about depression as an illness is it robs people of their ability to do everyday things. So for example, getting up, getting dressed, getting washed, deciding what you want to wear can all be really impaired by the symptoms of depression. I try and help people to understand that the symptoms are real, they’re not imagined. Often people will tell me that they imagine these things or that they aren’t real and that it’s all in their mind.  

    Their symptoms are real, they exist in the body and do exert a really detrimental effect on just your ability to do what most of us take for granted on a day-to-day basis.  

    Lucy: And so it’s a lot more than sadness isn’t it? 

    Anne: Absolutely. It can be very profound feelings of sadness but often that’s amplified by feelings of extreme guilt, of shame, anger and anxiety is another common feature of depression.  

    Also, when people are very profoundly depressed they can actually just feel numb and feel nothing and that in itself can be very distressing because things that might normally move you to feel a real sense of connection. Say for example your children or your grandchildren, you may have no feelings whatsoever, and that in itself can be very alarming to people. 

    Lucy: The way that depression and its treatment are thought about can vary depending on who you speak to. Just like with other sorts of mental health problems. More biological viewpoints prioritise thinking about brain changes that can occur with depression while more social perspectives prioritise thinking about the context that people are part of.  

    Anne: As CBT tends to take a more pragmatic view of thinking about a connection between events in o

    • 30 min
    CBT for Anxiety: How are Anxious Thoughts Like the Circle Line?

    CBT for Anxiety: How are Anxious Thoughts Like the Circle Line?

    Anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems, but there's a good evidence-base for CBT as a helpful intervention. In this podcast, Dr Lucy Maddox speaks with Dr Blake Stobie and Claire Read, about what CBT for anxiety is like, and how anxious thoughts can be like the circle line. 
     
    Show Notes and Transcript
    Websites
    BABCP
    https://www.babcp.com
    Accredited register of CBT therapists
    https://www.cbtregisteruk.com
    Anxiety UK
    https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk
    NICE guidelines on anxiety
    https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs53
    Apps
    Claire recommended the Thought Diary Pro app as being helpful to use in conjunction with therapy to complete thought records. 
    https://www.good-thinking.uk/resources/thought-diary-pro/
    Books
    Claire recommended this workbook on Overcoming Low Self Esteem by Melanie Fennell https://www.amazon.co.uk/Overcoming-Low-Self-Esteem-Self-help-Course/dp/1845292375/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=self+esteem+workbook+melanie+fennell&qid=1605884391&s=books&sr=1-2
    And this book by Helen Kennerley on Overcoming Anxiety is part of the same series
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Overcoming-Anxiety-Books-Prescription-Title/dp/1849018782/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=overcoming+anxiety&qid=1605884437&s=books&sr=1-1
    Credits
    Image used is by Robert Tudor from Unsplash
    Podcast episode produced and edited by Lucy Maddox for BABCP
    Transcript
     
    Lucy: Hello and welcome to Let’s Talk About CBT, the podcast from the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies, BABCP. This podcast is all about CBT, what it is, what it’s not and how it can be useful.  

    In this episode we’re thinking about CBT for depression. I spoke with Dr Anne Garland who spent 25 years working with people who experience depression and Sharon, who has experienced it herself.  

    Both Anne and Sharon come from a nursing background. Anne now works at the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre as a consultant psychotherapist, but she used to work in Nottingham, which is where Sharon had CBT for depression. Here’s Sharon.  

    How would you describe what depression is like?  

    Sharon: When I was going to school, when I was a little girl, an infant, we would have to go over the fields because I lived in the country, and go down. I could hear the bell of the junior school but couldn’t find it because of the fog. I walked round and round, I was five, walked round and round and round in those fields trying to get to the bell where I knew I would be safe and being terrified on my own. And that’s how it feels actually. Darkness, cold, very frightening.  

    Lucy: I asked Anne how depression gets diagnosed and she described a range of symptoms.  

    Anne: In its acute phase it’s characterised by what would be considered a range of symptoms. So, tiredness, lethargy, lack of motivation, poor concentration, difficulty remembering. Some of the most debilitating symptoms are often disturbed sleep and absence of any sense of enjoyment or pleasure in life and that can be very distressing to people. People can be really plagued with suicidal thoughts and feelings of hopelessness that life is pointless.  

    I think one of the most devastating things about depression as an illness is it robs people of their ability to do everyday things. So for example, getting up, getting dressed, getting washed, deciding what you want to wear can all be really impaired by the symptoms of depression. I try and help people to understand that the symptoms are real, they’re not imagined. Often people will tell me that they imagine these things or that they aren’t real and that it’s all in their mind.  

    Their symptoms are real, they exist in the body and do exert a really detrimental effect on just your ability to do what most of us take for granted on a day-to-day basis.  

    Lucy: And so it’s a lot more than sadness isn’t it? 

    Anne: Absolutely. It can be very profound feelings of sadness but ofte

    • 35 min
    What is cognitive behavioural couples therapy?

    What is cognitive behavioural couples therapy?

    We tend to think about therapy as something that is helpful for individuals, but what about when you want to address problems which affect you and a partner or spouse? In this episode, Dr Lucy Maddox speaks to Dan Kolubinski about cognitive behavioural couples therapy, and hears from Liz and Richard about what the experience was like for them. 
    Show Notes and Transcript
    Dan recommended the book Fighting For Your Marriage by Markman, Stanley & Blumberg
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fighting-Your-Marriage-Best-seller-Preventing-dp-0470485914/dp/0470485914/ref=dp_ob_title_bk
    Some journal articles on couples therapy are available free online here:
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-cognitive-behaviour-therapist/information/let-s-talk-about-cbt-podcast
    The podcast survey is here and takes 5 minutes: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/podcastLTACBT
    The BABCP website is at www.babcp.com
    And the CBT Register of accredited CBT therapists is at https://www.cbtregisteruk.com
    Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash
     
    Transcript
    Lucy: Hello, and welcome to Let’s Talk About CBT. It’s great to have you listening.  

    When we think about therapy, we often think of one-to-one conversations between one person and their therapist. But what about when the problems that we’re going for help with are related to how we’re getting on with a partner or a spouse? Cognitive behavioural couples therapy helps with these sorts of difficulties. To understand more about it I spoke to a married couple, Richard and Liz, and Dan Kolubinski, their therapist.  

    Richard and Liz did this therapy privately, but couples therapy is also available on the NHS to help with some specific difficulties. We hear more about that from Dan later on. For now though let’s hear what Richard and Liz thought of their couples therapy in this interview which I recorded with them remotely.  

    Richard: My name’s Richard. I’m 37 years old and I’ve been married to Liz for just over seven years now. I’m a postie at the moment, and kind of lived in Essex most of my life.  

    Liz: It’s like a dating programme.  

    Richard: It is, isn’t it? Yeah, a little bit. (laughs) 

    Liz: So I’m Liz and I make cakes for a living, and write about mental health. So that’s us.  

    Lucy: That’s great. So thanks so much for agreeing to speak with me about your experience of couples therapy, and specifically cognitive behavioural couples therapy. Would you mind telling me how you came across it and what made you think you might want to try it? 

    Liz: Yeah. So I think it’s something that we’ve spoken about in the past. And we’ve both had therapy separately, and I think we’ve both had various different types of therapy. So Richard has had CBT before, I think we’ve both done psycho-dynamic counselling.  

    So when we decided we were going to do it, we realised that for us it was more beneficial to almost do a crash course, as it were, together. So to do a whole weekend, rather than a little bit once a week. And that was how we discovered Dan, and were able to book in with him.  

    Richard: Yeah, I think we both understand the value or had both experienced and understood the value of therapy individually. So it was kind of an easy step for us then to decide there could be a lot of value in doing this together.  

    Lucy: That makes total sense. So you already had a bit of an understanding of what it might be like, or what it’s like on an individual level? 

    Liz: Yeah, definitely. And actually very early on in our marriage we had some couples counselling, which I don’t think was actually as successful, and it was after that that we had separate counselling. And I think it was after we were both able to get ourselves into better positions, as it were, that that’s when we were able to come back together and experience some therapy together.  

    Lucy: That’s really interesting. Do you think that helped

    • 40 min
    Digital CBT

    Digital CBT

    What is digital CBT? How does therapy work over the internet? Can it ever be as good as face-to-face? Dr Lucy Maddox hears from Dr Graham Thew and Fiona McLauchlan-Hyde about an internet-based CBT programme for PTSD. Fiona shares her experience of how this therapist-supported programme helped her through traumatic grief, and also has some helpful advice for people trying to comfort those who are bereaved. 
     
    Show Notes and Transcript
    BABCP website is at www.babcp.com
    CBT Register of accredited CBT therapists is at https://www.cbtregisteruk.com
    BPS Top tips for psychological sessions delivered by video call for adult patients
    https://www.bps.org.uk/sites/www.bps.org.uk/files/Policy/Policy%20-%20Files/Top%20tips%20for%20psychological%20sessions%20by%20video%20%28adult%20patients%29.pdf
    Resource from OCD-UK on getting the most out of online CBT
    https://www.babcp.com/files/Therapists/Oxford-OCD-Making-the-Most-Out-of-Remote-Therapy-for-Patients-by-OCDUK.pdf
    Graham’s recent paper in the Cognitive Behavioural Therapist can be found on the podcast journal article page
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-cognitive-behaviour-therapist/information/let-s-talk-about-cbt-podcast
    Information from Cruse about traumatic grief
    https://www.cruse.org.uk/get-help/traumatic-bereavement/traumatic-loss
    The Good Grief Trust
    https://www.thegoodgrieftrust.org
    Image is by Cassie Boca on Unsplash
    Transcript
     
    Lucy: Before we get started, I want to remind you about the survey which I released at the beginning of August. I really would like to know more about who is listening to these podcasts and what you would like. The link to the survey is in the show notes and it takes about five minutes to complete. If you have time to fill it in I would be really grateful.  

    Hello, and welcome to Let’s Talk About CBT, with me, Dr Lucy Maddox. This podcast is all about CBT, what it is, what it’s not, and how it can be useful.  

    Today I am exploring digital CBT. I speak to a therapist who has been researching internet based CBT programmes that are supported by a therapist, and I speak to someone who has experienced this first hand.  

    The particular programme that we talk about is for PTSD, which we’ve heard about before in a previous episode. In this case PTSD was related to an experience of traumatic grief.  

    Fiona: I think I started last September and I finished just before lockdown, actually.  

    Lucy: Gosh, so in a way good timing.  

    Fiona: Yeah, it was great timing to finish just before lockdown. It put me in a good place I think, to be able to deal with what was going on, rather than if it had been six months earlier it would have been a very different experience I think.  

    Lucy: It took Fiona, who is based in Oxfordshire, a long time to find this type of therapy.  

    Fiona: It all started six and a half years ago, when my husband died of cancer.  

    Lucy: I’m so sorry.  

    Fiona: He was diagnosed in the June, and he died in the December, and it was really horrific. He was 49, I was 42 at the time. And so it was heartbreaking and I couldn’t cope. I couldn’t cope afterwards. We had a little girl, she was seven when he died. And my world was turned upside down.  

    And I got help at first. But then, as with all things, life goes on around you and everyone thinks you’re fine. And I was still putting my lipstick on, so therefore everyone thought I was okay. And I felt I was getting worse and worse, and no one would believe me.  

    And it wasn’t until I threw all of my toys out of the pram; after having therapy through my local GP – so this was last year, last summer – sitting in my car afterwards for about an hour just sobbing, because no one believed me that I was feeling as bad as I was.  

    And I asked to be put in touch with TalkingSpace. And they put me forward for a trial with Oxfordshire Mental Health, and it changed my life. It absolu

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
61 Ratings

61 Ratings

Benito1767 ,

Good podcast

I’m really enjoying these podcasts as am very interested in CBT. I mainly listen at bedtime. But Dr Lucy Maddox has a really nice soporific voice so I sometimes drift off to sleep whilst listening (this is not a criticism!)...

Slimy neon ,

Super helpful

This podcast does a brilliant job of giving an overview of what can seem like a complicated and overwhelming array of therapies. So helpful for anyone considering therapy or indeed anyone involved in therapy and wanting to find out more. Brilliant guest speakers too. And Lucy has such a wonderful, kind and gentle voice that manages to sound curious, inquisitive, friendly and knowledgeable all at the same time.

Chris Winson ,

Brilliant resource to understand CBT more

What a brilliant job Dr Lucy Maddox has done, to aid understanding and information of CBT, in all its flavours, which is a great resource for anyone considering or in therapy. The world of therapy is full of acronyms, so it's helpful to understand more about some of them mean and from both a theory and an experience point of view.

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