94 episodes

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).

TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing TED Talks

    • Education
    • 4.5, 54 Ratings

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).

    • video
    How do our brains process speech? | Gareth Gaskell

    How do our brains process speech? | Gareth Gaskell

    The average 20-year-old knows between 27,000 and 52,000 different words. Spoken out loud, most of these words last less than a second. With every word, the brain has a quick decision to make: which of those thousands of options matches the signal? And about 98% of the time, the brain chooses the correct word. How is this possible? Gareth Gaskell digs into the complexities of speech comprehension. [Directed by Art Shot, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].

    • 4 min
    • video
    The myth of Jason, Medea, and the Golden Fleece | Iseult Gillespie

    The myth of Jason, Medea, and the Golden Fleece | Iseult Gillespie

    In Colchis, the hide of a mystical flying ram hangs from the tallest oak, guarded by a dragon who never sleeps. The only way Jason can pry it from King Aeetes' clutches and win back his promised throne is by facing three perilous tasks— without the help of the Argonauts. Unbeknownst to the king, his daughter Medea was plotting something. Iseult Gillespie shares the myth of the Golden Fleece. [Directed by Jordan Bruner, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].

    • 4 min
    • video
    The rise and fall of the Celtic warriors | Philip Freeman

    The rise and fall of the Celtic warriors | Philip Freeman

    One summer evening in 335 BCE, Alexander the Great was resting by the Danube River when a band of strangers approached his camp. Alexander had never seen anything like these tall, fierce-looking warriors with huge golden neck rings and colorful cloaks. They were Keltoi or Celts— a collection of independent tribes spread across Europe. Philip Freeman details the rise and fall of the ancient Celts. [Directed by Paper Panther, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].

    • 4 min
    • video
    The Egyptian myth of the death of Osiris | Alex Gendler

    The Egyptian myth of the death of Osiris | Alex Gendler

    Long jealous of his older brother Osiris, the god who ruled all of Egypt, the warrior god Set plotted to overthrow him. Hosting an extravagant party as a ruse, Set announced a game— whoever could fit perfectly in a wooden chest could have it as a gift. But the chest was a coffin, trapping Osiris inside. Will his sisters be able to find and free him? Alex Gendler details the myth of Osiris. [Directed by Keegan Thornhill, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Jarrett Farkas].

    • 3 min
    • video
    The race to decode a mysterious language | Susan Lupack

    The race to decode a mysterious language | Susan Lupack

    In the early 1900s, archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans uncovered nearly 3,000 tablets inscribed with strange symbols. He thought the script, dubbed Linear B, represented the Minoan language, while others came up with their own theories. Was it the lost language of the Etruscans? Or an early form of Basque? Its meaning would elude scholars for 50 years. Susan Lupack explores the mysterious inscriptions. [Directed by Movult, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Stephen LaRosa].

    • 4 min
    • video
    What makes volcanoes erupt? | Steven Anderson

    What makes volcanoes erupt? | Steven Anderson

    In February of 1942, Mexican farmer Dionisio Pulido thought he heard thunder coming from his cornfield. However, the sound wasn't coming from the sky. The source was a large, smoking crack emitting gas and ejecting rocks, and would come to be known as the volcano Paricutin. Where do new volcanoes like this come from, and what triggers their unpredictable eruption? Steven Anderson investigates. [Directed by Cabong Studios, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Astrolábio Studio / Julio Muzzi].

    • 5 min

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