193 episodes

Emergency Medicine podcasts based on evidence based medicine focussed on practice in and around the resus room.

The Resus Room Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 492 Ratings

Emergency Medicine podcasts based on evidence based medicine focussed on practice in and around the resus room.

    August 2022; papers of the month

    August 2022; papers of the month

    Welcome back! This month we take a look at 3 papers covering the breadth of Emergency Care.
    First up we look at a paper evaluating outcomes for patients discharged on scene by an EMS service; how many reattend ED, how many require ICU care and what is the associated mortality rate?
    NEXUS and Canadian c-spine rules both incorporate the presence of c-spine tenderness when deciding whether to image the neck as a result of trauma. But what is the prevalence of c-spine tenderness without trauma and how might that affect our clinical assessment?
    Finally we take a look at a paper focussing on the risk of laryngospasm in paediatric sedation; what is the risk, which factors make it more likely to occur, and what can we do to mitigate it's risk?
    Enjoy!
    Simon & Rob

    • 29 min
    Lactate; Roadside to Resus

    Lactate; Roadside to Resus

    So when people talk about patients having a high lactate we think about them being sick, it can at times be easy to slip into thinking that this equals sepsis or maybe ischaemia. And whilst the presence of a high lactate in the context of infection and ischaemia is important to note, there is a lot more to interpreting a raised lactate than may first be apparent...
    So in this episode we’re going to delve down into lactate, have a think about what it is, what normal and raised levels are, consider the mechanisms behind it’s formation and breakdown and think about the causes of raised lactate. We'll then put this all together and have a think about how we can interpret and lactate levels ensuring we give the best treatment to our patients!
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James

    • 25 min
    July 2022; papers of the month

    July 2022; papers of the month

    • 30 min
    Intraosseous Access; Roadside to Resus

    Intraosseous Access; Roadside to Resus

    So, as we all know, there are loads of presentations that we see in Emergency Medicine that require us to gain rapid access to the circulation. Either to administer medicines around the body or to get fluids into the circulation.
    Now there’s a number of different ways we can get them into the circulatory system for them then to get to their sites of action, each of which comes with its pros and cons. There’s buccal, inhaled, intramuscular, sublingual, intranasal etc etc….
    But, in the vast majority of cases we gain this access to the vasculature through intravenous access and a peripheral cannula. That means that iv access is a very common procedure in emergency care. The great news is that the equipment is cheap, there are multiple sites for insertion and it’s often feasible regardless of the patients age or presenting complaint. Compared to all the other options for drug administration, iv access and administration of drugs via the IV route, results in 100% bioavailability of all medicines because it avoids the first pass metabolism in the liver, and distribution around the body is rapid because it bypasses the need for absorption into the vasculature.
    So that’s all good, so why are we doing an episode on intraosseous access then? Well, iv access and we as clinicians, are not infallible. And as we’re all too aware, gaining IV access can be challenging. There are other patient factors to like iv drug use, the morbidly obese and paediatric patients when everything is just smaller and more unfamiliar. So all of these factors increase the technical difficulty of iv cannulation. If we add to that some of the environmental issues we might find in the prehospital setting - so poor lighting or difficult patient access, it’s not a huge leap to realise that it would be great to have an alternative vascular access option available to a broad range of emergency care providers. And this is where IO access comes in.
    So what will we be covering in this episode;
    -A recap on the anatomy of bones
    -Indications for IO access
    -The evidence on IO access and administration
    -Insertion site
    -Needle selection
    -Contraindications
    -Case examples
    Once again we’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James

    • 1 hr 3 min
    June 2022; papers of the month

    June 2022; papers of the month

    Welcome back to June '22 papers podcast!
    This month we start off with a look at rocuronium dosing in RSI; could a simple change of dosage lead to an increased first pass success for our intubations?
    Next up we take a look at the use of TXA in trauma, with specific focus on gender based inequality in its use and a trial with shocking results.
    Finally we take a look at a paper focussing on outcomes of cardiac arrest and cut-off points with regards to duration of resuscitation; could this help answer that ever-difficult question of when to stop?
    Once again we’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.
    Simon & Rob
     

    • 32 min
    Leadership and Followership; Roadside to Resus

    Leadership and Followership; Roadside to Resus

    We talk a lot about the different skills involved in the management of the critically unwell patient; CPR, airway management, defibrillation, chest drains, RSI etc, etc…..but there is another aspect which is arguably as important and that is the non-technical skills involved in resuscitation.
    In this podcast we discuss non-technical skills, followership, leadership and different models of working. What’s really important to remember in this episode is that at the centre of  leadership and follwership is a patient, or patients, that we’re trying to deliver the best care and outcomes for and that effective leadership and followership are key to achieving.
    Now leadership and followership comes in a variety of places but for this episode we’re mainly going to look at the importance and way in which leadership and follower ship manifests itself in high acuity cases such as traumas and cardiac arrests but the concepts are translatable to all sorts of cases and parts of healthcare.
    Once again we’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
492 Ratings

492 Ratings

Annie the Blake ,

Emergency midwifery in the community

As a recently retired midwife - with over 30 years experience- I found this podcast extremely interesting and also learnt from it! I spent the last 18 years of my career in a stand alone MLU (midwife led unit) and expecting the unexpected was a given. Regular PROMPT training was certainly invaluable as was the first part of my career in busy hospital settings where I experienced almost every possible obstetric emergency. I agree with Amy that breech births should be viewed as physiological with the caveat of awareness of deviations from the norm - as in cephalic births. Thanks for such an informative podcast and brilliant and likeable presenters

polarisharris ,

Healthy does of education

Really interesting podcast with such great evidenced based breakdowns of conditions. The banter is just the right amount whilst maintaining a healthy does of education.

RossEdwards95 ,

The best medical podcast

I’ve pretty much listened to every episode since these guys started and it has taught me so much. Their approach to evidence based medicine and critical appraisal, combined with covering some of the most relaxant and useful topics in emergency medicine is awesome. The podcast itself is super high quality, very regularly updated and has a consistent and familiar format. It’s certainly improved my clinical practice. Thanks guys!

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