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The other side is dangerously wrong. They think you are too. But for democracy to work, we need to hear each other out. Times Columnists Michelle Goldberg and Ross Douthat, with other voices from Opinion and beyond, debate the big questions affecting our lives. Their candid debates help you form your own opinion of the latest news, and learn how the other half thinks. Find the best ways to persuade in the modern search for common ground.

The Argument The New York Times

    • ニュース
    • 4.4 • 17件の評価

The other side is dangerously wrong. They think you are too. But for democracy to work, we need to hear each other out. Times Columnists Michelle Goldberg and Ross Douthat, with other voices from Opinion and beyond, debate the big questions affecting our lives. Their candid debates help you form your own opinion of the latest news, and learn how the other half thinks. Find the best ways to persuade in the modern search for common ground.

    The 46th: Joe Biden to the Rescue (Plan)

    The 46th: Joe Biden to the Rescue (Plan)

    For the final episode in “The 46th” series, Michelle and Ross commemorate the inauguration of the 46th president with a debate about America’s post-Trump future. Ross compliments the ceremony’s “vague Hunger Games vibe,” and Michelle exhales for the first time in four years. Then, the pair discuss the uphill task for President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to govern a country devastated by a pandemic, extreme political division and a staggering economy. Biden economic adviser Jared Bernstein joins the duo to allay their doubts and volley questions about the new president’s “Rescue Plan” to resuscitate America’s work force and even out an inequitable economy. Finally, Jared offers the show a little class in a classical favorite.

    For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument.

    • 48分
    The 46th: Will A Second Impeachment Change Republican Minds?

    The 46th: Will A Second Impeachment Change Republican Minds?

    It’s impeachment season all over again on “The Argument,” and Michelle and Ross debate whether Republicans will, at long last, turn their backs to President Trump, or confirm that their party is resolutely his. Will Mitch McConnell really consider delivering enough Republican votes to convict Trump? The duo discuss the events of the last week and a half and the deepening fracture in the Republican Party, and Michelle is surprised to long for “the party of cruel Ayn Rand-ism” in exchange for “Qanon and guerrilla warfare.” Ross admits how wrong he’s been in analyzing violent extremism in recent years. Then, the hosts take up the question of deplatforming Trump, and the rabid hordes he foments. And finally, Ross suggests you find some escapism in a grim, dark, revisionist fantasy.

    For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument.

    • 39分
    I Love Section 230. Got a Problem With That?

    I Love Section 230. Got a Problem With That?

    In this special bonus episode, Jane Coaston makes her hosting debut on “The Argument” to discuss one of her favorite subjects: Section 230. As scholar Jeff Kosseff defined it, the “26 words that created the internet,” is part of the Communications Decency Act of 1996, and it protects websites from liability. The law also allows internet companies to moderate third-party content on their sites.
    The banning of President Trump from many social media platforms has led to renewed calls from both political parties to amend or revoke Section 230. Jane debates what changing the law might mean with Klon Kitchen, director of the Center for Technology Policy at the Heritage Foundation, and Danielle Keats Citron, a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law and author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”

    • 38分
    The 46th: The End of Trump or the End of American Democracy?

    The 46th: The End of Trump or the End of American Democracy?

    Ross Douthat and Michelle Goldberg debate whether the events that unfolded on Wednesday should be classified as a “coup.” Then, Michelle Cottle deploys her expertise on Congress to analyze the Georgia election results and predict what a Democratic Senate means for Joe Biden and how conservative Democrats might play a role in Republicans’ long-term plans.

    Finally, Michelle Cottle recommends a series to watch that while not apolitical may help give respite from the current moment.

    • 35分
    How 2020 Changed Our Minds

    How 2020 Changed Our Minds

    Happy New Year and good riddance, 2020! Ross and Michelle ring in 2021 with a reflection on how their opinions changed during “this wild and crazy and terrible and interesting and disastrous and a longer list of adjectives year,” as Ross so eloquently defines 2020. The hosts are joined by a bevy of thoughtful “Argument” listeners who share what — or who — made them look at the world in a new way this year. Then, Michelle and Ross offer their hopes for 2021, and recommend two streaming options that young and old can enjoy together.

    For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument.

    • 33分
    The 46th: Will Georgia's Races Change The Senate?

    The 46th: Will Georgia's Races Change The Senate?

    As part of our series “The 46th,” The Argument’s hosts and guests are debating the events of the transition and what America under a Biden administration should look like.

    Now that we’re less than three weeks away from the Georgia runoff elections that will determine the balance of power in the U.S. Senate, Michelle, Ross and fellow Times columnist Jamelle Bouie take stock of the Democratic candidates and assess their strengths and weaknesses. Jamelle and Michelle make the case for a Warnock victory, while Ross makes a surprising prediction of the outcome.

    Then Michelle and Ross debate whether President Trump’s actions over the past four years constituted fascism or just looked like fascism. Michelle says Trump has insidiously invaded democratic institutions, while Ross argues that sometimes conservatism can look a little bit like fascism.

    And Michelle has a recommendation for last-minute holiday shoppers.

    For background reading on the episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument.

    • 37分

カスタマーレビュー

4.4/5
17件の評価

17件の評価

wkdawson

finally, a return to informed civil discussion between people with different political view points

As a moderate, I see this as a good step in the right direction. The New York Times has an essential resource of both liberal and conservative columnists. Ross Douthat has published in National Review and been on Jonah Goldberg's The Remnant. Michele Goldberg (no relation to Jonah Goldberg) is more on the liberal side, and David Leonhardt is perhaps somewhere in between, and in the columns I have read, has an educated technical sense. So there is a healthy balance of political, cultural and economic sense being exchanged and debated in a civil and thoughtful way. To put them together to discuss these issues is probably challenging, but it puts together the flavor of informed discussion as in Commentary or National Review podcasts but with people who have stronger ideological differences in their points of view.

Sometimes, I have seen joint work between Bret Stephens and Gail Collins, but it is very irregular. Hence, this weekly podcast appears to be a helpful way for us to understand why people of different ideological bend are thinking they way they are. I’m not sure that it will do anything bridge the divide, but even if it helps people understand that the issues are very complex with undesirable consequences whatever policy is employed, this would be far better than to listen to people who preach fear and claim to know how everything works and how to fix it. In that respect, it’s an encouraging start.

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