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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Sunday Read: ‘How Danhausen Became Professional Wrestling’s Strangest Star’

    The Sunday Read: ‘How Danhausen Became Professional Wrestling’s Strangest Star’

    Like a lot of people who get into professional wrestling, Donovan Danhausen had a vision of a different version of himself. Ten years ago, at age 21, he was living in Detroit, working as a nursing assistant at a hospital, watching a lot of “Adult Swim” and accumulating a collection of horror- and comedy-themed tattoos.

    At the suggestion of a friend, he took a 12-week training course at the House of Truth wrestling school in Center Line, Mich., and then entered the indie circuit as a hand: an unknown, unpaid wrestler who shows up at events and does what’s asked of him, typically setting up the ring or pretending to be a lawyer or another type of extra. When he ran out of momentum five years later, he developed the character of Danhausen. Originally supposed to be an evil demon, Danhausen found that the more elements of humor he incorporated into his performance, the more audiences responded.

    “I was just a bearded guy with the tattoos, trying to be a tough guy, and I’m not a tough guy naturally,” he said. “But I can be weird and charismatic, goofy. That’s easy. That’s also a role that most people don’t want to fill.”

    Over the next couple of years, the Danhausen gimmick became more funny than evil, eventually settling on the character he plays today — one that is bizarre even by the standards of 21st-century wrestling.

    • 32 min
    Should The Government Pay for Your Bad Climate Decisions?

    Should The Government Pay for Your Bad Climate Decisions?

    A few days ago, the Biden administration released a report warning that a warming planet posed severe economic challenges for the United States, which would require the federal government to reassess its spending priorities and how it influenced behavior.

    White House reporter Jim Tankersley explains why getting the government to encourage the right decisions will be so difficult.

    Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 27 min
    Our Film Critic on Why He’s Done With the Movies

    Our Film Critic on Why He’s Done With the Movies

    A.O. Scott started as a film critic at The New York Times in January of 2000. Next month he will move to the Book Review as a critic at large.

    After 23 years as a film critic, Mr. Scott discusses why he is done with the movies, and what his decision reveals about the new realities of American cinema.

    Guest: A.O. Scott, a longtime film critic for The New York Times.

    • 41 min
    Barney Frank on His Role in the Banking Crisis

    Barney Frank on His Role in the Banking Crisis

    Barney Frank was one of the people most responsible for overhauling financial regulation after the 2008 economic crisis. After retiring from Congress, he supported a change to his own law that would benefit midsize banks, and joined the board of such a bank.

    Last week, that bank failed. David Enrich called Mr. Frank and asked him to explain.

    Guest: David Enrich, the business investigations editor at The New York Times.

    • 36 min
    China, Russia and the Risk of a New Cold War

    China, Russia and the Risk of a New Cold War

    As Xi Jinping, China’s leader, meets with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia in Moscow this week, Chinese officials have been presenting his trip as a mission of peace. But American and European officials are watching for something else altogether — whether Mr. Xi will add fuel to the full-scale war that Mr. Putin began more than a year ago.

    Edward Wong explains what Mr. Xi is really up to, and why it’s making people wonder whether a new Cold War is underway.

    Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 23 min
    How TikTok Became a Matter of National Security

    How TikTok Became a Matter of National Security

    TikTok, the app known for short videos of lip syncing, dancing and bread baking, is one of the most popular platforms in the country, used by one out of every three Americans.

    In recent weeks, the Biden administration has threatened to ban it over concerns that it poses a threat to national security.

    Guest: Sapna Maheshwari, a business reporter for The New York Times.

    • 28 min

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