167 episodes

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 11 Ratings

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

    From the archive: Are western lifestyles causing a rise in autoimmune diseases?

    From the archive: Are western lifestyles causing a rise in autoimmune diseases?

    Could the food we eat and the air we breathe be damaging our immune systems? The number of people with autoimmune diseases, from rheumatoid arthritis to type 1 diabetes, began to increase around 40 years ago in the west. Now, some are also emerging in countries that had never seen the diseases before. In this episode from January 2022, Ian Sample speaks to the genetic scientist and consultant gastroenterologist James Lee about how this points to what western lifestyles might be doing to our health, and how genetics could reveal exactly how our immune systems are malfunctioning. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min
    From the archive: Why are climate and conservation scientists taking to the streets?

    From the archive: Why are climate and conservation scientists taking to the streets?

    In early April this year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a new report giving the world just 30 months to get greenhouse gas emissions falling. Beyond that, we’ll have missed our chance of limiting global heating to 1.5C. As this summer of heatwaves, droughts, wildfires and floods prove, going much above 1.5C will have truly devastating consequences for us and the planet. With the window of opportunity rapidly closing, some scientists feel like writing reports and publishing papers is no longer enough, and are leaving their desks and labs to take action on the streets. In this episode recorded back in April, Madeleine Finlay meets scientists protesting at Shell HQ in London and speaks to the conservationist Dr Charlie Gardner about civil disobedience – and why he thinks it’s the only option left. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min
    James Lovelock and the legacy of his Gaia hypothesis

    James Lovelock and the legacy of his Gaia hypothesis

    James Lovelock, the creator of the Gaia hypothesis, died last Tuesday on his 103rd birthday. Known as something of a maverick, the scientist and inventor was one of the most influential thinkers of the past century. Our global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, tells Madeleine Finlay about spending time with Lovelock for his forthcoming biography, the impact of the scientist’s ideas and inventions on the modern world, and how his immense influence will continue to be felt in the critical decades ahead. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 16 min
    Is it time for a complete overhaul of car wreck rescue techniques?

    Is it time for a complete overhaul of car wreck rescue techniques?

    For decades, the absolute priority when rescuing victims after traffic accidents has been to minimise movement of the spine. Emergency services go to great lengths to keep the patient still while they are cut free from the wreckage, because a shift of just a millimetre could potentially lead to the person needing to use a wheelchair. Or at least, that’s what firefighters used to think. Now, thanks to new research using simulated accident rescues, that wisdom is starting to change. Anand Jagatia speaks to the Guardian’s science correspondent, Linda Geddes, and emergency medicine consultant Dr Tim Nutbeam about the findings, and what they mean for survivors of motor vehicle collisions.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min
    Which Tory leadership candidate is the ‘greenest’?

    Which Tory leadership candidate is the ‘greenest’?

    Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak have clashed on a number of issues as they battle to become the next prime minister. However, as heated debates hit our television screens, the climate emergency has been alarmingly absent from discussions. Ian Sample chats to Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey about which candidate is ‘least bad’ when it comes to green policies, and why one of the world’s most urgent issues has taken a back seat in the leadership contest. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 12 min
    Learning how to cope with ‘climate doom’

    Learning how to cope with ‘climate doom’

    The impacts of the climate crisis are undeniably here. Heatwaves, droughts, wildfires and flooding are causing devastation around the world. And yet, we still aren’t seeing the drastic action that’s required to avert climate disaster. As things get worse, it’s easy to give up hope – but ‘climate doomism’ is just as dangerous as climate denial. Anand Jagatia speaks to psychotherapist Caroline Hickman about her research on climate anxiety, and how we can turn feelings of doom into positive action. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 14 min

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11 Ratings

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