257 episodes

Talking Tax, from Bloomberg Tax, is a weekly discussion of the most pressing issues facing tax and accounting professionals. Each week the podcast features discussions with lawmakers, federal regulators, lawyers, and journalists. From the courts to Capitol Hill to the IRS, Talking Tax has it covered.

Talking Tax Bloomberg Tax

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    • 3.8 • 82 Ratings

Talking Tax, from Bloomberg Tax, is a weekly discussion of the most pressing issues facing tax and accounting professionals. Each week the podcast features discussions with lawmakers, federal regulators, lawyers, and journalists. From the courts to Capitol Hill to the IRS, Talking Tax has it covered.

    EY Tax Vice Chair Optimistic On Global Tax Agreement

    EY Tax Vice Chair Optimistic On Global Tax Agreement

    The global tax pact that’s been agreed to by nearly 140 countries has run into some obstacles, but the new global vice chair of tax for EY thinks chances are good that the big changes the agreement calls for will ultimately be implemented.
    EY’s Marna Ricker acknowledges that there’s a lot of work still to be done on both of the key parts of the agreement—Pillar One, which would reallocate a chunk of the taxing rights on big companies’ profits to other countries, and Pillar Two, which would impose a 15% global minimum tax.
    “I think this is going to be a really interesting window of time,” Ricker said.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, senior reporter Michael Rapoport discusses the OECD agreement and the new Inflation Reduction Act taxes with Ricker, who assumed her new post on Oct. 1. She’s been with EY for 28 years, and had previously been vice chair of tax for EY Americas.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 11 min
    Student Loan Forgiveness? It's Taxable in Some States

    Student Loan Forgiveness? It's Taxable in Some States

    An estimated 43 million Americans qualifying for the Biden administration’s student loan debt forgiveness program won’t have to account for the $10,000 benefit on their federal 1040 tax returns next year, but they could face a very different reality when they file their state returns.
    The federal government and most states are waiving taxes on the cancellation of debt program. According to one analysis, roughly seven states—Arkansas, California, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Wisconsin—plan to make debtors pay income taxes ranging from a few hundred dollars to as much as $900, depending on the state.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, Bloomberg Tax senior correspondent Michael J. Bologna caught up with Jared Walczak, vice president of state projects at the Tax Foundation, to help sort through some of these potentially complicated state tax issues. He explained which states plan to tax student loan debt cancellation and how taxpayers should account for the benefit. 

    • 14 min
    Accounting Standards Chief Tackles Crypto, Tax Law

    Accounting Standards Chief Tackles Crypto, Tax Law

    Richard Jones took the helm of the board charged with writing US accounting rules the same year the coronavirus pandemic upended the economy.
    Jones and the six other members of the Financial Accounting Standards Board had to act quickly to tackle questions on how to use accounting standards during such an uncertain time. Two years later, FASB is plotting its next big moves, including writing rules for buzzy topics like cryptocurrency and figuring out how the new tax-and-climate law will impact its work.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, Jones speaks with Bloomberg Tax's Nicola M. White about FASB's agenda and how the standard-setter works with a Securities and Exchange Commission that's increasingly active in accounting issues.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 13 min
    EY Faces Headwinds as Firm Leaders Push for Split

    EY Faces Headwinds as Firm Leaders Push for Split

    Ernst & Young faces numerous challenges as it tries to gain ground in the competitive advisory market while maintaining its place in the audit industry as its leaders push ahead with a planned breakup of the $40 billion revenue firm.
    The consequential deal could hinder EY's ability to retain and hire the skilled professionals it needs to deliver in-demand audit and reporting services as a stand-alone audit firm, said Jim Peterson, former in-house attorney for Arthur Andersen, the former top audit firm which collapsed in 2002.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, Peterson discusses with Bloomberg Tax's Amanda Iacone about what EY’s breakup means to the accounting industry and the risks that firm leaders face as they try to decouple the global business.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 14 min
    Companies Still Lag in Use of Data for Tax Planning

    Companies Still Lag in Use of Data for Tax Planning

    Tax data and technology can be helpful for companies when making projections for tax planning purposes, but companies have to weigh when the best time is to implement them.
    Data can give more certainty for companies in scenario planning, such as for the Inflation Reduction Act and everyday business decisions, said Greg Engel, vice chair of tax at KPMG LLP. Still, 52% of companies aren’t using tax data for this work, according to a recent KPMG report.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, Engel speaks about the importance of companies incorporating tax data into tax planning, how companies are trying to hire to fill this need, and why now is the best time to integrate it.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 12 min
    IRS Aims to Stop Abusive Schemes from Gaining Traction

    IRS Aims to Stop Abusive Schemes from Gaining Traction

    The IRS is seeking to prevent new, potentially abusive transactions from gaining traction with taxpayers. Early this year, the agency launched a group, called the Joint Strategic Emerging Issues Team, so that representatives from a wide range of IRS offices can collaborate to quickly identify areas where there's a high risk of noncompliance and determine how best to address these issues.
    On this episode of Talking Tax, we speak with two IRS officials involved in the team: Benjamin Swartz, senior adviser to the commissioner of the Small Business/Self-Employed Division, and Holly Porter, associate chief counsel for passthroughs and special industries.
    Swartz and Porter discuss the goals of JSEIT, the makeup of the team, and the types of issues the group is focusing on.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
82 Ratings

82 Ratings

BHD #10 ,

EV credit - both sides of the debate

Will you have a part II episode on the EV credit that discuss the point of view from the Republicans side? I think it would be beneficial to learn about this topic from both sides of the aisle. Thanks.

SomethingWitty11 ,

Keep it focused on tax

People get enough of the ultra woke mandatory training at the office, so they probably aren’t going to voluntarily listen to it here. I would think you want to keep it “tax technical” to keep your listener base in tact… just a suggestion.

roz1bug ,

Topic is okay, audio quality is poor

To me, the audio quality seems low. I would enjoy this podcast a lot more if the audio sounded better to me.

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