185 episodes

On The Merits brings you the biggest stories of the week from Bloomberg Law and Bloomberg Government, coupled with smart interviews and analysis on a variety of legal and government topics. You’ll hear voices and perspectives from across the industry, including reporters, editors, attorneys, legal scholars, and government officials. Host: David Schultz.

On The Merits Bloomberg Industry Group

    • News
    • 4.0 • 27 Ratings

On The Merits brings you the biggest stories of the week from Bloomberg Law and Bloomberg Government, coupled with smart interviews and analysis on a variety of legal and government topics. You’ll hear voices and perspectives from across the industry, including reporters, editors, attorneys, legal scholars, and government officials. Host: David Schultz.

    Who's to Blame for Commerce Department Billing Mess?

    Who's to Blame for Commerce Department Billing Mess?

    The Commerce Department's disastrous rollout of a new payment system left some National Weather Service employees on the hook for their own business expenses, and even led utility companies to shut off power to some critical weather systems due to unpaid bills.
    Bloomberg Government reporter Jack Fitzpatrick found that even now, months after this system went online, the Department is still working through a backlog of unpaid invoices. And despite a report from its Inspector General, it's still not clear what exactly went wrong and who at the Department is to blame.
    On this episode of our podcast, On The Merits, Fitzpatrick explains what happens when a federal agency can't pay its bills on time and what might happen when the Department expands this troubled payment system in the years to come.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 17 min
    Why Lawsuits Against Campus Antisemitism May Succeed

    Why Lawsuits Against Campus Antisemitism May Succeed

    Harvard, NYU, and several other elite universities have been hit with civil rights lawsuits from students who say the schools allow, or at least don't counter, campus antisemitism.
    Though these suits largely stem from an increase in antisemitic incidents since Oct. 7, attorneys say the groundwork for them was laid with an executive order back in 2019. That's when the Trump administration adopted a broad definition of antisemitism for civil rights claims under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    On today's episode of On The Merits, Bloomberg News reporter David Voreacos talks about the litigation and why the policy change could pose challenges for the universities facing the suits. We also hear from attorneys representing Jewish students in two of the suits. They explain why they believe universities should be held accountable for the actions of their students and faculty.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 16 min
    Russian Bankruptcy Sheds Light on Litigation Finance

    Russian Bankruptcy Sheds Light on Litigation Finance

    It's becoming more common for investors to chip in money for a lawsuit in exchange for a share of any payout a party wins, a practice known as litigation finance. But, as a recent Bloomberg Law investigation found, the identities of these litigation funders is often shrouded in mystery—and can have national security implications.
    Bloomberg Law reporters Emily R. Siegel and John Holland learned about a Russian company with close ties to Vladimir Putin that financed the creditors in US and UK bankruptcy proceedings—even after several of its founders were sanctioned due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.
    Holland and Siegel join our podcast, On The Merits, to explain why attorneys say this was an attempt to use litigation finance to evade international sanctions, and whether it will lead to new rules on this practice. They also talk about how the Russian company came within hours of receiving a more than $6 million payout before a bankruptcy judge put a stop to it.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 16 min
    California Fights to Keep Insurers Despite Fire Risk

    California Fights to Keep Insurers Despite Fire Risk

    Insurance companies like The Allstate Corp. and State Farm have experienced one too many devastating wildfire seasons in California. Many are looking to exit the market in impacted communities, but a powerful state lawmaker is trying to keep them.
    Mike McGuire is a Democrat representing a Northern California district directly affected by wildfires, and he just became the top ranking member of the California State Senate. Many of his constituents say they've gotten non-renewal notices or steep rate hikes. He wants to require insurers to issue policies to property owners who take wildfire mitigation measures.
    On this episode of On The Merits, our California correspondent Andrew Oxford tells us why insurers no longer want to cover climate-vulnerable areas and what politicians like McGuire can do about it.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 16 min
    Why Are Lawyers Still Making Bad AI Mistakes?

    Why Are Lawyers Still Making Bad AI Mistakes?

    Generative AI has the potential to transform the legal profession, and the guest on today's episode of our podcast, On The Merits, believes it will. But the tech also has led some lawyers to make embarrassing and costly mistakes.
    Lawyers have filed briefs in court that contain citations fabricated by AI tools. And a law firm in New York recently got a dressing down from a judge for using AI to estimate the fees it was entitled to.
    Katherine Forrest, a former federal judge and current partner at the firm Paul Weiss, talks with Bloomberg Law reporter Isabel Gottlieb about why AI isn't appropriate to use in many legal settings—at least not yet. Forrest also goes into some of the useful ways lawyers can take advantage of AI technology right now.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 19 min
    Law Firms Need to Be Aware of Neurodivergence Trend

    Law Firms Need to Be Aware of Neurodivergence Trend

    A quarter of law students surveyed by Bloomberg Law late last year said they self-identify as neurodivergent, an umbrella term for people with ADHD, autism, or another condition that causes their brains to function differently than that of the average person.
    But the same survey found that more than three times fewer working attorneys identify as neurodivergent. Which means, as more of this upcoming cohort of lawyers enters the workforce, firms may need to change their policies to accommodate them—or, at the very least, to avoid being hit with disability discrimination complaints.
    Bloomberg Law analyst Jessica Blaemire analyzed the survey data, and also looked at federal data on discrimination complaints specifically related to neurodivergence. She joins our podcast, On The Merits, to talk about what these numbers mean and about what firms can do to make their workplaces more welcoming.
    Do you have feedback on this episode of On The Merits? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

SaraClaireSharp ,

Seems good!

Seems like a decent podcast but I couldn’t focus because the audio was so terrible

Didi Sug ,

Excellent!

Always insightful and informative. The journalists do a great job explaining recent and intriguing issues!

Leea1776 ,

Journalists with an Agenda Spitting Propaganda

Journalists with no legal education seeing things through partisan and ideological lenses and distorting legal arguments to promote their world view. Good example of propaganda and fake journalism. Listen if you want to listen to bad journalism and see examples of propaganda

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