535 episodes

Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

It's Been a Minute It's Been A Minute

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 8.3K Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    When parents say sorry on-screen

    When parents say sorry on-screen

    Family conflict is a cinema staple. But recently Hollywood has come out with a slew of stories about parents and children confronting gaps in culture, generation and identity — from animated films like Encanto and Turning Red, to the recent miniseries Ms. Marvel and the indie hit Everything Everywhere All at Once. Vox entertainment critic Emily St. James calls the subgenre the "millennial parent apology fantasy." She shares with guest host B.A. Parker how the form came to be, what its limits are and how it could pave the way for new perspectives about trauma and family.

    • 14 min
    Guess who's back in the house (music scene); plus 'Would it Kill You to Laugh'

    Guess who's back in the house (music scene); plus 'Would it Kill You to Laugh'

    In a matter of days Beyoncé and Drake both released music that draws deeply on 90s era house music. Neither of them are queer, but the they're borrowing from a genre that has been liberating for Black & Latino queer people from the 70s to today. In this episode our June guest host B.A. Parker welcomes Back Issue's co-host Josh Gwynn to chat about house music's roots and the genre's resurgence. Also, comedians Kate Berlant & John Early talk about their new special Would it Kill You to Laugh. They're great friends, and they let us in on some of their inside jokes.

    • 33 min
    Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

    Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

    Fangirls often don't get taken seriously in pop culture. But in her new book, Everything I Need, I Get From You: How Fangirls Created the Internet as We Know It, culture reporter Kaitlyn Tiffany explores just how much fangirls have shaped online life. She talks with guest host B.A. Parker about how fans used Tumblr to transform internet culture, how being a One Direction fan enriched her own life and why fandom is more complicated than we might think.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at ibam@npr.org.

    • 27 min
    Why old is new again in pop music; plus, 'Rutherford Falls'

    Why old is new again in pop music; plus, 'Rutherford Falls'

    When singer-songwriter Kate Bush released "Running Up That Hill" in 1985, it peaked at number 30 on the Hot 100. Now it's soared into the top ten, thanks to the newest season of Stranger Things. Guest host B.A. Parker talks to Stereogum writers Rachel Brodsky and Chris Deville about why old music seems to be getting more love than new music these days — and how even new music seems retro. Plus, actor and writer Jana Schmieding on the second season of Rutherford Falls, exploring physical comedy, and honoring aunties.

    • 33 min
    Joseph Han on U.S. imperialism, Korean ghosts and Guy Fieri

    Joseph Han on U.S. imperialism, Korean ghosts and Guy Fieri

    We don't often think of Hawaii and the Korean peninsula as having any kind of shared history. But author Joseph Han disagrees — and he makes the case in his debut novel Nuclear Family. In this episode, Han and guest host B.A. Parker discuss the book and Han's experience as a Korean immigrant in Hawaii. And they unpack the long effects of U.S. imperialism and military presence in both places. Along the way, they get into ghosts, grandmas and Guy Fieri.

    • 17 min
    Even influencers are burning out; plus there's nothing boring about 'Normal Gossip'

    Even influencers are burning out; plus there's nothing boring about 'Normal Gossip'

    These days, it seems everyone wants to be an influencer. But as content creators realize that it's a demanding, often short-lived career, they're forcing us to think hard about the future of an industry that's still on the rise. Guest host B.A. Parker speaks with Rebecca Jennings, senior correspondent at Vox, who reported on how influencer burnout is a microcosm of our changing relationship with work.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
8.3K Ratings

8.3K Ratings

you look like stupid man haha ,

Wow I love this new season

Thank you npr for the new season of its been a minute this is the best culture related stuff I’ve heard in a while thank and bye

MarcAlexander7 ,

Gotta Have Who Said That?!

I think the show is doing great after Sam’s departure, but y’all have to keep the Who Said That? segment. It’s such a fun way to get through three more news topics, and it brings a degree of levity to Friday episodes that is perfectly suited for IBAM. Please keep that as part of the weekly offering.

lesliemargs ,

Still a great podcast on culture!

I’ll miss Sam, but this is still a great podcast. It’s great to hear these perspectives on culture-related topics!

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